Resources

Resources

The Resources page provides links to websites and resources of interest to InspireNet members.

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Research, Quality Improvement, Program Evaluation, and Evidence-based (or Evidence-informed) Practice are different. More information is available on the Research Skills page.

►Open Access scholarly articles are linked in InspireNet's Scholarly Articles Repository.

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International

Being a nurse practitioner is a demanding profession and, these 10 best iPhone apps for nurses have been solely created for this demanding, yet, rewarding career. The clever apps are fitting to a nurse's professional and lifelstyle requirements. Make a wise investment in your career with these 10 best iPhone apps for Nurses.

Evidence-based practice
International

The incorporation of relevant high quality research evidence into the policy-making process has been outlined as a key strategy to improve health systems worldwide (World Health Organization 2004; Lavis et al. 2006). This thinking was reflected in 2005 at the World Health Assembly, when World Health Organization member states committed to establishing or strengthening existing mechanisms that will facilitate the transfer of knowledge to support evidence-based health systems, including policies that are informed by scientific evidence (World Health Assembly 2005). However, linking research to policy requires both a comprehensive understanding of the policy-making process—including the influence of institutions, interests, ideas and external events—and an awareness of a number of established strategic approaches that are available to support the use of relevant research evidence in the formulation of health policies.

Knowledge Translation
International

It’s been estimated that over 50 million scholarly articles have been published globally (Jinha, 2010) since the first journals were launched over 400 years ago and that the number of articles published increases by about 3.3% annually. So in this expanding sea of research, how can you increase the chances that your article and your audience will connect? Here are some suggestions…

Patient Safety
International

In August, Mountain States Healthcare Alliance, a 13-hospital integrated healthcare delivery system based in Johnson City, Tenn., received the 2012 National Quality Healthcare Award from the National Quality Forum, recognizing the system's achievement of multiple quality-focused goals. Rather than just representing a culmination of efforts, the award is spurring the system to continue providing quality care, according to Dennis Vonderfecht, president and CEO of MSHA.

"No matter how many quality awards we receive, we can never sit back and say we are satisfied with the level of quality we have achieved," he says. "So while we are extremely gratified to be recognized at this level, we will continue to work just as diligently to ensure that we are providing the best care possible to the people of our region."

Academic Nursing
International

Nursing education is an ongoing process. Even if you're enrolled in a nursing school, your learning should extend beyond the classroom. You can stay tuned in to nursing any time by just following these Twitter feeds for nursing students.

Health & Nursing News - Find health and nursing news on these Twitter feeds.
 

eHealth Resource
International

Mobile medicine is everywhere. There's the iPhone app that lets you cut away images of muscle layers to see what lies beneath, an e-health record system for the iPad, and a smartphone-based blood pressure monitor. Here are a dozen innovative ones.

Patient Safety
International

While most health practitioners know that patient safety is paramount, there is room for improvement, says Robin Diamond, MSN, JD, RN.

Diamond, who is senior vice president for the Department of Patient Safety at the Doctors Co., Napa, Calif., identifies safety and risk management loopholes in “Practice managers play key role in patient safety,” an online exclusive article in the March issue of MGMA Connexion magazine. In the article, she discusses a recent study by the Doctors Co. that identified medical record documentation, lab tests and referrals, patient scheduling and follow-up as areas where medical practices and hospitals can improve patient safety.

Knowledge Translation
Canada

The use of Twitter as an effective social media tool for knowledge mobilization is still not understood. This was made clear to me by two things that happened this past week:

  1. I was actively involved in a discussion with several members of EENet – the Evidence Exchange Network where the use of Twitter for research dissemination was called into question; and,
  2. I performed a brief Twitter survey of the 16 classic Networks of Centres of Excellence in Canada (NCE) that focus on research-driven partnerships, and found that these NCEs are still not effectively using this valuable social media tool, despite the Government of Canada’s knowledge mobilization mandate for NCEs “to transform these discoveries into products, services, and processes that improve the quality of life of Canadians.”
Professional Development
International

The 2009-2010 Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence (referred to as the Health Care Criteria) is used by organizations that are primarily engaged in furnishing medical, surgical, or other health services directly to people.

Conference Presentations
International

International Simulation Standards: The Impact on Educators

In its sixth year, this interactive conference brought together nurses from practice and academia to share and promote the latest ideas and research to promote simulation in its widest context at all levels in nurse education. We welcomed poster and oral presentations, as well as interactive workshops from nurses and all the allied health professions to network and share at this two day event.
 

Conference Presentations
International

The following handouts are provided as a courtesy for attendees of the 28th Annual Pediatric Nursing Conference, to be held July 19-21, 2012, in Boston, MA. To download individual session handouts in Adobe Acrobat format, click on the title of the session you wish to download. Conference session handouts will remain available online for one year after the conference.

Care delivery innovation
International

From bundled reimbursement payments to specialty service lines, in the current health care environment providers are increasingly called on to decrease costs while improving patient outcomes. A budget-friendly solution that many hospitals have found to answer this pressing need is encouraging patients to become more involved in their own care. According to a 2015 study published in Health Affairs, increasing patient engagement both lowers economic costs and improves patient outcomes. It's a strategy with a low financial cost that provides big results in the hospital setting. 

Knowledge Translation
International

Choosing something that you are passionately interested in to research is a great first step on the road to successful academic writing but it can be difficult to keep the momentum going. Deborah Lupton explains how old-fashioned whiteboards and online networking go hand-in-hand, and advices when it is time to just ‘make a start’ or go for a bike ride.

As part of preparing for a workshop on academic publishing for early career academics, I jotted down some ideas and tips to share with the group which I thought I would post here. In the process of writing 12 books and over 110 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters over a career which has mostly been part-time because of juggling the demands of motherhood with academic work, I have developed some approaches that seem to work well for me.

These tips are in no particular order, apart from number 1, which I consider to be the most important of all.

eHealth Resource
International

When you decide to be a nurse, chances are that you made the decision in order to help people. You can be a great help to people when you better understand how to treat them. The good news is that there are a number of tutorial sites available so that you can learn about being a better health care professional.

Health care professionals can use the Internet as a resource. From information about different diseases and conditions, to case studies, to creating treatment plans, to understanding health care law and ethics. You can learn a lot about health care and improved outcomes by looking online. If you are interested in becoming a better nurse, you can use these 40 tutorial sites for information and help:

General Information, Reference and Tutorials

If you are looking for general information on health care, you can visit these web sites. This information can include reference resources and tutorials related to general health care subjects. These great resources can help you become a better nurse.
 

Patient Safety
Canada

Patients are at high risk of fragmented care, adverse drug events, and medication errors during transitions of care. Ensuring safe medication transitions is complex. It requires patients to be an active partner in their health to ensure that they have the information they need to use their medications safely.

ISMP Canada, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute, Patients for Patient Safety Canada, the Canadian Pharmacists Association and the Canadian Society for Hospital Pharmacists have collaborated to develop a set of 5 questions to help patients and caregivers start a conversation about medications to improve communications with their health care provider.

Professional Development
International

Did you know that the average manager gets interrupted approximately once every eight minutes? That’s about seven interruptions each hour. What’s worse, after every interruption, it takes an average of 25 minutes to fully regain cognitive focus. No wonder at the end of an eight-hour day, you still feel like you haven’t accomplished anything.

Constant emails and phone calls and coworkers dropping by to ask "just a quick question" can eat up the majority of your working time, leaving your real work untouched at the end of the day. Business performance expert Shawn Casemore says the key to improving our productivity is managing interruptions. Here's how.

eHealth Resource
International

"How do you eat in elephant? In small bites." The same rule probably applies to staying current with the ever expanding avalanche of medical literature.

Network
International

For new nurses, the world of healthcare, hospitals, and more can be overwhelming. And a degree, certification, and license can only do so much. This is why getting advice from someone with experience can be a life saver.

With that in mind, below are the 50 best blogs for new nurses. Whether looking locally or overseas, from a man or woman, or looking to work in a specific area of medicine, they can help immensely.
 

Professional Development
International

Taking a team from ordinary to extraordinary means understanding and embracing the difference between management and leadership. According to writer and consultant Peter Drucker, "Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things."

Manager and leader are two completely different roles, although we often use the terms interchangeably. Managers are facilitators of their team members’ success. They ensure that their people have everything they need to be productive and successful; that they’re well trained, happy and have minimal roadblocks in their path; that they’re being groomed for the next level; that they are recognized for great performance and coached through their challenges.

Network
International

The BBC announced, “The addictive nature of web browsing can leave you with an attention span of nine seconds – the same as a goldfish.” For nurses who love to write, how do you grab your audiences' attention?

Wow! If nine seconds is all the time you have to grab a visitor’s attention, it’s not your blog content that’s going to draw them in, but rather how your blog looks and the emotion it evokes that will make all the difference.

Knowledge Translation
International

This first part may sting a bit: To those healthcare organizations in the beginning stages of rolling out a data analytics program, chances are you're going to do it completely and utterly wrong.

At least that's according to Eugene Kolker, chief data scientist at Seattle Children's Hospital, who has been working in data analysis for the past 25 years. When talking about doing the initial metrics part of it, "The majority of places, whether they're small or large, they're going to do it wrong," he tells Healthcare IT News. And when you're dealing with people's lives, that's hardly something to take lightly.

Database
International

Today marks the culmination of a good few months listening to what users were saying and acting upon it. We have just rolled out our new ‘My Data’ section. This is the part of figshare that allows you to manage your research outputs. As well as being more more intuitive and simple to manage your research data both publicly and privately in the cloud. There are also a few new features to help make the free service as useful as possible.

Research Report
BC

In September 2014, we collaborated with the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research to administer a study of the implementation of CCM. Led by InSource Research, the study’s findings will help BC better understand and manage large scale change while improving transformation within the province’s health system moving forward.

Research Project
Canada

Issue: A dramatic increase in type 2 diabetes among Indigenous people has been called an “epidemic in progress” with prevalence rates estimated to be three times higher than in non-Indigenous communities.1

Project: Beginning in the mid-1980s, Dr. Macaulay, a physician on the Kahnawake Mohawk Territory near Montreal, collaborated with her Mohawk colleague, the late Dr. Louis T. Montour, to produce initial studies that indicated high rates of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Encouraged by community leaders to help prevent young people from developing the disease, they began the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project (KSDPP) in 1994.

eHealth Resource
Canada

People and Processes reflects leading practices and lessons learned for managing change in eHealth projects from across Canada. Based on this experience, this guide and toolkit has been developed as:

  • a support for change management (CM) leaders and practitioners working within eHealth, particularly for jurisdictional level and large institutional projects and programs.
  • a useful resource for front line clinicians, managers and senior leaders with a project implementation / quality / risk focus.
  • an introductory resource for individuals with CM as part of their role but who may not yet have any formal education.
Program Evaluation
Canada

Public health actors in public, community and academic networks may be called upon to work on public policies and, within the context of this work, to interact with policy makers at different levels (municipal, provincial, etc.). However, they often find that the content of their discourse does not meet all the information needs of these decision makers.

This document presents a structured process based on an analytical framework that reflects a public health perspective, while at the same time integrating other concerns of policy makers. The document addresses four questions:

  • What public policies does this analytical framework apply to?
  • In what types of situations is it useful?
  • Which policy facets does it focus on?
  • How is the analysis carried out?
Knowledge Translation
International

Wider adoption of evidence-based, health promotion practices depends on developing and testing effective dissemination approaches. To assist in developing these approaches, we created a practical framework drawn from the literature on dissemination and our experiences disseminating evidence-based practices. The main elements of our framework are 1) a close partnership between researchers and a disseminating organization that takes ownership of the dissemination process and 2) use of social marketing principles to work closely with potential user organizations. We present 2 examples illustrating the framework: EnhanceFitness, for physical activity among older adults, and American Cancer Society Workplace Solutions, for chronic disease prevention among workers. We also discuss 7 practical roles that researchers play in dissemination and related research: sorting through the evidence, conducting formative research, assessing readiness of user organizations, balancing fidelity and reinvention, monitoring and evaluating, influencing the outer context, and testing dissemination approaches.

eHealth Resource
International

The intent of this IHI Innovation Project was to scan for health technology innovations that will provide the greatest value to health systems working to achieve the IHI Triple Aim: simultaneously improving the patient experience of care, improving the health of populations, and reducing the per capita cost of health care.

As the health care landscape shifts toward population health management and enacted policies work to curb the rising cost of health care, emerging digital health technologies should seek to realize the Triple Aim.

Using validated approaches to software selection, we created a Digital Health Selection Framework (DHSF) to guide patients, providers, and payers through the procurement of technology to help them achieve the Triple Aim.

Knowledge Translation
Canada

This learning module has been created primarily with a researcher audience in mind, but care has been taken throughout to ensure that the language and content is meaningful and accessible to non-academics looking for guidance. The sections are written in every-day language and have been kept as jargon-free as possible, and the text has been broken up with many examples and case studies, illustrating points discussed in each section. We hope that all knowledge users who choose to partner with researchers, including communities and community members, clinicians and professional associations, government agencies and policy makers, service planners and providers, and the general public, will find the material valuable.

Knowledge Translation
Canada

This module material was developed by Participatory Research at McGill (PRAM), a McGill University-based centre that opened in fall 2006 and is dedicated to furthering the scholarship, understanding and use of a partnered approach to health research (Participatory Research at McGill (PRAM)). PRAM is dedicated to the idea that, by integrating knowledge users into and throughout the research process, better health outcomes can ultimately be achieved. The tutorials were created by drawing on years of combined experience in partnered research, joined with a critical mining of the current literature to create a practical how-to guide for on-the-ground research partnerships to follow.

Patient Safety
Ontario

We are pleased to launch the third Guidebook to Patient Safety Leading Practices entitled, Advancing Patient Safety through Ideas and Innovations. The aim of the 2010 Guidebook is to highlight and share innovative patient safety initiatives in Ontario hospitals, focused on four themes: boards and leadership, teamwork and communication, transparency of data and accountability, and patient and family
and engagement.

Research Resources
BC

Health and wellness depend on many things, including where we live, the work we do, and our network
of family and friends. Our health also depends on our genetic makeup and our ability to access
high-quality and effective health care. While we can’t control all of these variables, we can improve
our health with the knowledge gained and applied through research.

HSR Resources & Funding
Canada

Canadian health services and policy research (HSPR) represents a diverse and growing field. Concerns about the quality, cost and sustainability of the health care system are dominant across the majority of countries and Canada is no exception. The ability of HSPR to inform and evaluate what works, for whom, at what cost, and under what circumstances makes a direct contribution to strengthening our health care system and thus improving the health of Canadians. As the field of HSPR evolves, so too does the desire to qualify and quantify its growth and evolution and to harness such information to plan for its future success.

Evidence-based practice
International

Nurse practitioners (NPs) and other advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are leading providers of health care services in the United States and will play an increasingly prominent role in patient care as access expands. NPs can play an important role in promoting evidence-based preventive health practices by, for example, incorporating recommendations from the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) into clinical practice. AHRQ has incorporated USPSTF recommendations into the Electronic Preventive Services Selector (ePSS), which is a user-friendly evidence-based decision support tool designed for mobile technology. In addition, AHRQ has a number of other resources, such as the Effective Health Care (EHC) Program, which are designed to provide clinicians with current evidence on a wide variety of tests and treatments.

The purpose of this Webinar is to provide an overview of AHRQs evidence-based publicly available tools and resources to inform clinical practice.

Professional Development
International

A key recommendation of the Institute of Medicine’s landmark report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health is to have nurses achieve higher levels of education, with a goal of 80 percent of nurses holding a bachelor’s degree or higher by 2020. Now, a new study identifies the factors that best predict whether nurses will return to school to earn those degrees.

According to the study—part of the RN Work Project, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation— there are a variety of motivators, from desire for advancement to job dissatisfaction, that influence registered nurses (RNs) to pursue a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree or higher. The study was published in the November/December issue of the Journal of Professional Nursing.

Motivators cited in the study include an interest in career and professional advancement, gaining new knowledge, improving social welfare skills, and being a positive model for one’s children. RNs identified a desire to achieve personal and job satisfaction and professional achievement as important intrinsic motivators. Nurses with graduate degrees are more likely to report being extremely satisfied with their jobs, compared with nurses who hold associate’s degrees, who more frequently report moderate to extreme dissatisfaction with their jobs.
 

Canada

Front-line employees in health care and workers’ compensation frequently make challenging decisions about the most appropriate treatments for injured workers to help facilitate return-to-work. Clinical Decision Support (CDS) tools are designed to inform these decisions based on individual worker characteristics. In this plenary, Dr. Ivan Steenstra outlines the existing literature on these tools and examines the extent to which research evidence supports their use.

Program Evaluation
BC

In British Columbia (BC), the first nurse practitioners (NPs) graduated and were hired into regional health authorities beginning in 2005. Early expectations for the role included increasing accessibility, expanding health care options and filling gaps in the BC healthcare system. NPs were expected to provide safe, competent, and acceptable care to British Columbians. As of January 2014 there are 287 NPs registered in BC.

The Practice Pattern Survey was part of a larger study funded by the Michael Smith Foundation to evaluate the integration of NPs in BC. The purpose of the survey is to provide evidence of how NPs in BC are practicing. Data were collected from June 2013 through November 2013. The survey was first conducted in 2011 and a report of the findings was given to the Ministry of Health in 2012.

Knowledge Translation
Canada

Key Messages

  • Quality improvement (QI) strategies are appropriate for improving certain clinical outcomes such as increasing colorectal screening and increasing foot examination rates for diabetic patients.
  • It is difficult to evaluate the outcomes of QI strategies in primary healthcare because the approaches used vary and are often multifaceted.
  • Studies measuring patient or provider perceptions of QI are few given the design constraints of randomized controlled trials, time-series studies and before-after studies.
  • Currently, primary healthcare accreditation is non-government funded and voluntary with some countries offering financial incentives.
  • There is a lack of research on primary healthcare teams and QI and accreditation; what little research is available is mostly done with family physicians.
  • Further research is required in QI in primary healthcare including: the effect of QI on a broader range of patient outcomes; the most effective method for improving patient outcomes; impact on healthcare utilization; cost effectiveness; and impact on patient and provider perceptions.
  • Research is required in primary healthcare on the effects of accreditation including: the effect of accreditation on patient outcomes; whether accreditation is an effective method to improve quality of care; impact on healthcare utilization; cost effectiveness; and impact on patient and provider perceptions.
Professional Development
International

Creating goals that you will actually accomplish isn’t just a matter of defining what needs doing—you also have to spell out the specifics of getting it done. Research shows that you can significantly improve your odds by using what motivational scientists call if-then planning to express your intentions. We’re neurologically wired to make if-then connections, so they’re powerful triggers for action.

This tool will help you take advantage of how the brain works. To begin, break down your goals into concrete subgoals and detailed actions for reaching them.

Education Module
International

HCV infection is a leading cause of complications from chronic liver disease and was the underlying or contributing cause of 16,000 deaths in the United States in 2010. Current estimates are that approximately 3.2 million people in the United States have chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection, although many are unaware that they carry the virus. Screening could identify patients at earlier stages of disease, when interventions might be effective in improving clinical outcomes or reducing transmission risk. The material in this streaming video learning module covers the results and conclusions from the comparative effectiveness review (CER) titled Screening for Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Adults, which was produced for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) by the Pacific Northwest (formerly Oregon) Evidence-based Practice Center. The full report is a comprehensive systematic review of the existing body of evidence about benefits and harms of HCV screening in asymptomatic adults without known liver enzyme abnormalities. The relative effectiveness of various screening strategies for HCV infection, including effects on clinical outcomes, and the potential harms of screening are discussed. Evidence about the impact of counseling interventions on clinical and intermediate outcomes is presented and the effects of labor-and-delivery practices and breastfeeding on mother-to-child transmission of HCV infection are also discussed. This video will also briefly discuss the effectiveness of antiviral treatments on intermediate and clinical outcomes, and will mention some new antiviral therapies under investigation.

First Nations
Canada

Aboriginal Health Researchers at Canadian Universities is a comprehensive listing of researchers who are affiliated with a Canadian university and have a wide range of expertise related to the health of Aboriginal peoples. These researchers have undertaken some form of research related to the health and well-being of First Nations, Inuit and/or Metis peoples, ranging from one study to a lifetime of work in a particular area. 

First Nations
Canada

Welcome to the Aboriginal Health Resource Directory. This directory provides a full spectrum of content spanning multiple categories, serving the interests of students, researchers, and communities in the area of Aboriginal Health.

First Nations
Ontario

Earn Mainpro credits and enhance your knowledge of First Nations, Inuit and Métis (FNIM) cancer care by completing the courses available for this subject area:

  • First Nation, Inuit and Métis Culture, Colonization and the Determinants of Health
  • Aboriginal History and Political Governance
  • The Need for Cultural Competence in Health Care
  • Current Array of Aboriginal Health Services
  • CCO and the Aboriginal Cancer Strategies
  • Indigenous Knowledge and Traditional Health
  • Aboriginal Community Health Services
  • The Cancer Landscape of FNIM People
  • Cancer Control Issues and Challenges
Healthcare interventions
Canada

Caring for people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias is a long-term commitment for health-care providers.

From diagnosis until the end of life, health-care providers are called upon to support not only the person with the disease, but family caregivers as well.

This section includes information and resources to help physicians provide early diagnosis and to help all health-care providers support individuals and their families throughout the continuum of the disease.

eHealth Resources
BC

These Resource Centres have been developed in collaboration with parents and experts at The Hospital for Sick Children, and are offered to families in partnership with BC Children's Hospital.

Nova Scotia

AcademiaMap is an Online Influence Assessment App designed for scholars. AcademiaMap helps scholars to filter the “noise” from their Twitter streams using various “influence” metrics and gives scholars an easy way to identify trending topics and interesting voices to follow from Twitter.
With one quick glance, scholars can assess the ‘influence’ level of a particular tweet or a Tweeter, and discover trending topics and who is connected to whom on Twitter!

Academic Nursing
International

Blogging has taken a high profile on site this week. Friday saw the launch of our Higher Education Blogs Network, a work-in-progress directory of some of the most interesting and informative blogs on higher education and HE issues globally. Then on Monday, we marked international Blog Action Day 2012, with an article by Ernesto Priego of UCL's Centre for the Digital Humanites on blogging's "power of we, not me".

The higher education blogosphere is sometimes caught between a rock and hard place, accused of narcissism on the one hand and of being an institutional echo-chamber on the other. Enough of the mythology, says Priego, who argues that blogging is the ultimate form of collegiality – if we understand collegiality as the relationship of professional colleagues united in a common purpose and respecting each other's abilities to work toward that purpose.
 

Open Access Journal
International

eGEMs (Generating Evidence & Methods to improve patient outcomes), a product of the Electronic Data Methods (EDM) Forum,* is an open access journal focused on using electronic clinical data to advance research and quality improvement, with the overall goal of improving patient and community outcomes.

Journal
International

eGEMs (Generating Evidence & Methods to improve patient outcomes), a product of the Electronic Data Methods (EDM) Forum, is an open access journal focused on using electronic clinical data to advance research and quality improvement, with the overall goal of improving patient and community outcomes.

Research Resources
Canada

The purpose of this report is to address the following three questions: what are the top three research priorities that ACAHO members are focused on? how do these priorities map against the Canadian Institutes of Health Research's (CIHR) four pillars of health research and the emerging health and health system challenges that have been identified by governments, health charities and CIHR?; and how are these priorities aligned with the federal government's Science and Technology Strategy and its sub-themes for health?

Program Evaluation
Canada

CFHI created this assessment tool to help healthcare leaders assess their organization’s or system’s capacity to undertake improvement initiatives.

The tool is built around six levers that will guide your organization toward making the changes needed to become a high-performing healthcare organization. For each lever (see Figure 1), the tool includes statements that help you assess where your organization or system currently performs. These levers were developed after an examination of the key attributes of three high-performing healthcare organizations — Southcentral Foundation in Alaska, Jönköping County Council in Sweden, and Intermountain Healthcare in Utah (read the full paper) and a review of Canadian literature on healthcare transformation (read the full paper).
Learn how to you use the tool.

Program Evaluation
Canada

CFHI created this self-assessment tool to help healthcare leaders assess their organization’s or system’s capacity to undertake improvement initiatives.

Evidence-based practice
Canada

Canadians care deeply about health care — for themselves, their families, and their communities. Ensuring that the health-care system can deliver the best possible care depends fundamentally on research that is supported by high-quality data. Much of the data relevant to health research arise from interactions within the health system — every encounter with a physician, a pharmacist, a laboratory technician, or hospital staff generates data. In the last several years there has been an explosion in the sheer volume and variety of health data. In addition, advances in information technology are making available new ways to manage health data. Understanding the best ways to access, store, and govern these data is an important issue for Canada and Canadians.

In an effort to obtain the latest evidence on the subject, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) asked the Council of Canadian Academies to assess the current state of knowledge surrounding timely access to health and health-related data — key for both health research and health-system innovation.

Research Report
Ontario

The Health Services Research Program is a joint effort of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) and Cancer Care Ontario (CCO). Its goal is to provide the knowledge needed to optimize the delivery of cancer services and to ensure appropriate dissemination of health service innovations and well-evaluated technologies.


This report provides brief summaries of results arising from 15 research studies that were conducted between 2010 and 2013. These research studies span the continuum of cancer care, from screening to symptom management in later stages of cancer. This report is intended for anyone with an interest in health care; for people at risk of developing cancer or for those with cancer. A scientific background is not needed. 

Research Report
Ontario

Over the years you have probably planned for many events such as weddings or vacations, but if you are like many others, you have probably not planned for the medical treatment or palliative care you would like to receive if you become critically ill (1).  Dr. Michelle Howard conducts research at McMaster University about end-of-life communication in primary care and encourages older adults – in fact, all adults – to start having ‘the talk’ now with their loved ones and caregivers.


Advance care directives or “living wills” are one way to make your personal wishes known about end-of-life care (2).  Dr. Howard points out that while writing down specific care decisions is a good idea, it can sometimes be difficult to understand the medical implications of these decisions (use of a feeding tube, for example) and people tend to change their minds in the reality of a new medical situation. The important thing is to clarify your values and general wishes for end-of-life care with those who might speak on your behalf (family, friends or caregivers). This is especially important as you get older because of the increased risk of developing diseases that may affect your ability to make decisions.

Program Evaluation
Canada

Across Canada, efforts are under way to strengthen primary health care (PHC), from the Divisions of
Family Practice in British Columbia and family health teams in Ontario to family medicine groups in
Quebec and collaborative family physician–nurse practitioner teams in Nova Scotia. Much work is needed though, as international comparisons suggest that Canada lags behind other developed nations in PHC performance and infrastructure. Canada’s historical lack of investment in PHC research, particularly in the domain of family medicine, has contributed to the current predicament.3 Compared with other health care disciplines, the past decade has seen a disproportionately low level of funding earmarked for family medicine research and few programs providing family physicians with advanced research training.

Advanced Practice Nursing
International

Social media has been used globally as a key vehicle for communication. As members of an innovative profession, many nurses have embraced social media and are actively utilizing its potential to enhance practice and improve health. The ubiquity of the Internet provides social media with the potential to improve both access to health information and services and equity in health care. Thus there are a number of successful nurse-led initiatives. However, the open and democratising nature of social media creates a number of potential risks, both individual and organisational. This article considers the use of social media within nursing from a global perspective, including discussion of policy and guidance documents. The impact of social media on both healthcare consumers and nurses is reviewed, followed by discussion of selected risks associated with social media. To help nurses make the most of social media tools and avoid potential pitfalls, the article conclusion suggests implications appropriate for global level practice based on available published guidance.

Network
International

One year after starting his Mainly Macro blog, Simon Wren-Lewis discusses the value of academic blogging. He finds that blogging has improved his teaching and helped him clarify his ideas.

I wanted to mark a year of blogging by encouraging other academics (particularly outside the US) to do the same. So lets use my experience to tackle some of the worries that may be holding others back.

Research Report
Canada

The Canadian Water Network and other research funding agencies are increasingly requiring that
research be designed, conducted and interpreted in consultation and collaboration with decisionmakers.  This ensures not only that research is relevant to decision-makers’ concerns, but also that research design emanates from an understanding of how the results will be relevant to decisionmakers and how researchers could assist them in making choices informed by the best available research. However, throughout this process of collaboration and consultation difficulties may arise that impede the formation of research partnerships.

To help facilitate collaborative research partnerships between decision-makers and researchers, we interviewed and consulted with individuals involved in the decision-making process (we call these individuals “end users”) in municipal, provincial and federal levels of government and advisory
agencies to provide advice to researchers based on their experience with research projects. Their
advice is summarized below.

Network
International

AEA365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association (AEA) and is dedicated to highlighting Hot Tips, Cool Tricks, Rad Resources, and Lessons Learned for evaluators. Beginning on January 1, 2010, our goal is to feature a post a day from and for evaluators around the globe.

If you are interested in contributing to the aea365 blog, or want to recommend someone to contribute, please review the contribution guidelines and contact the aea365 curators at aea365@eval.org.
 

International

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  • Browse guideline summaries by Topic or Organization, or view the complete Index of all current guideline summaries.

Learn

  • Broaden your knowledge with Guideline Resources. Go to Expert Commentaries for editorial insights on current issues in the field of guidelines. Find out more about NGC and guideline summaries under About.

Compare

  • Guideline Syntheses provide a comparative analysis of guidelines on similar topics. Or choose two or more guideline summaries to Compare side-by-side.

Ask

  • Contact Us with questions or comments about specific Guidelines or about the NGC Web site. You can find useful tips on the FAQ and Help pages.

Research Resources
International

This report is based on research conducted by the Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) under contract to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Rockville, MD (Contract No. HHSA-290-2007-100572). The findings and conclusions in this document are those of the authors, who are responsible for its content; the findings and conclusions do not necessarily represent the views of AHRQ. Therefore, no statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The information in this report is intended to help health care decisionmakers—patients and clinicians, health system leaders, and policymakers, among others—make well-informed decisions and thereby improve the quality of health care services. This report is not intended to be a substitute for the application of clinical judgment. Anyone who makes decisions concerning the provision of clinical care should consider this report in the same way as any medical reference and in conjunction with all other pertinent information, i.e., in the context of available resources and circumstances presented by individual patients.

Knowledge Translation
International

The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality created the Health Care Innovations Exchange to speed the implementation of new and better ways of delivering health care. The Innovations Exchange supports the Agency's mission to improve the quality of health care and reduce disparities.

The AHRQ Health Care Innovations Exchange offers busy health professionals and researchers a variety of opportunities to share, learn about, and ultimately adopt evidence-based innovations and tools suitable for a range of health care settings and populations.
 

Professional Development
International

TeamSTEPPS Instructor Guide:
The TeamSTEPPS Instructor Guide is designed to help you develop and deploy a customized plan to train your staff in teamwork skills and lead a medical teamwork improvement initiative in your organization from initial concept development through to sustainment of positive changes. Comprehensive curricula and instructional guides include short case studies and videos illustrating teamwork opportunities and successes. Supporting materials include a pocket guide (the Essentials Course), CD-ROM and DVD, and evaluation tools. Instructor and Trainer workshop materials focus on change management, coaching, and implementation.

TeamSTEPPS Rapid Response Systems Guide:
The TeamSTEPPS Rapid Response Systems Guide is designed to help you develop and deploy a customized plan to train your staff in teamwork skills and lead a medical teamwork improvement initiative in your organization from initial concept development through to sustainment of positive changes. This evidence-based module will provide insight into the core concepts of teamwork as they are applied to the rapid response system. Comprehensive curricula and instructional guides include short case studies and videos illustrating teamwork opportunities and successes. Supporting materials include CD-ROM and DVD, and evaluation tools.
 

International

The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality created the Health Care Innovations Exchange to speed the implementation of new and better ways of delivering health care. The Innovations Exchange supports the Agency's mission to improve the quality of health care and reduce disparities.

The Innovations Exchange helps you solve problems, improve health care quality, and reduce disparities.

  • Find evidence-based innovations and QualityTools.
  • View new innovations and tools published biweekly.
  • Learn from experts through events and articles.
Evidence-based practice
International

The aging of baby boomers and an increased need to contain hospital costs in the United States has led many organizations to fine tune their services for patients who are in need of palliative care. Most patients prefer to remain in their home at this time of their life; palliative and coordinated care can help them maintain control of their care choices, avoid inpatient and emergency department costs, and increase their satisfaction with their end-of-life care.

The featured Innovations describe two programs that used palliative care to help elderly and terminally ill patients make greater use of hospice and home care services. A third program coordinated care for Medicare patients and their families, allowing them to define their wishes and options for end-of-life care, increase their use of hospice services, and reduce the incidence of inpatient stays.
 

Patient Safety
International

Improving Performance on the AHRQ Quality Indicators

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This toolkit is designed to help your hospital understand the Quality Indicators (QIs) from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and support your use of them to successfully improve quality and patient safety in your hospital. The toolkit is a general guide to using improvement methods, with a particular focus on the QIs. It focuses on the 17 Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) and the 28 Inpatient Quality Indicators (IQIs).
 

Research Resources
International

The Effective Health Care (EHC) Program seeks the involvement of a wide range of stakeholders throughout the research process. AHRQ firmly believes that involving stakeholders from the beginning improves research results, and helps ensure that findings are relevant to users’ distinct concerns and have applications in real-world situations. This page links to resources for getting involved in the EHC Program, resources to help researchers involve patients, consumers, and others stakeholders, and ongoing work on methods for public and stakeholder engagement. Many of these resources have been developed by the AHRQ Community Forum.

Patient Safety
International

Guidance and tools to help healthcare facilities improve alarm safety

This free educational site is intended to help you understand the issues and take steps to improve alarm safety in your facility. It includes links to guidance articles published by ECRI Institute through our various membership groups, articles from the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, blog posts, and news.

Education Module
International

The American Nurses Association (ANA) has released its Principles for Social Networking and the Nurse: Guidance for the Registered Nurse, a resource to guide nurses and nursing students in how they maintain professional standards in new media environments.

Evidence-based practice
Ontario

Why is this study important?

Investigations related to the 2003 SARS outbreak raised concerns regarding the function and effectiveness of hospital Joint Health and Safety Committees (JHSCs). Most Ontario workplaces with more than 20 employees are legally required to have a JHSC.

What was the goal of the study?

To create and pilot test an evidence-driven assessment tool that JHSCs, employers and policy-makers can use to evaluate various JHSC functions and characteristics, and help improve JHSC effectiveness.

Ontario

Why is this study important?

Investigations related to the 2003 SARS outbreak raised concerns regarding the function and effectiveness of hospital Joint Health and Safety Committees (JHSCs). Most Ontario workplaces with more than 20 employees are legally required to have a JHSC.

What was the goal of the study?

To create and pilot test an evidence-driven assessment tool that JHSCs, employers and policy-makers can use to evaluate various JHSC functions and characteristics, and help improve JHSC effectiveness.

Evidence-based practice
International

Evolutionary theory, developmental systems theory, and evolutionary epistemology provide deep theoretical foundations for understanding programs, their development over time, and the role of evaluation. This presentation relates core concepts from these powerful bodies of theory to program evolution. The evolutionary developmental view is operationalized in terms of program and evaluation lifecycles, which are in turn aligned with multiple types of validity including viable validity. The resulting framework has important implications for many program management and evaluation issues. The presentation focuses on the appropriate role of randomized controlled trials and proposes a new definition of "evidence-based programs". From an evolutionary developmental perspective, prevailing interpretations of rigor and mandates for evidence-base programs pose significant challenges to program evolution. This perspective also illuminates the consequences of misalignment between program and evaluation lifecycles; the importance of supporting both researcher-derived and practitioner-derived programs; and the need for variation and lifecycle diversity within portfolios of programs.

Network
International

The purpose of ANIA-CARING is to advance the field of nursing informatics through communication, education, research and professional activities. 

Benefits of Membership in ANIA-CARING

* access to a network of over 3000 informatics professionals in 50 states and 34 countries,
* reduced rate at the annual conference,
* an active e-mail list,
* quarterly newsletter indexed in CINAHL and Thomson,
* job bank with employee-paid postings,
* a toll free number for contact with your CARING Board,
* reduced rate for the Computers, Informatics and Nursing journal,
* annual ANIA-CARING event during AMIA and annual dinner during SINI July,
* membership in the Alliance for Nursing Informatics,
* web-based meetings, and
* in-person meetings and conferences around the nation and the world.

Research Resources
International

Project Objectives

  1. Develop a simple, robust, easy-to-use authoring system to create and edit scholarly articles
  2. Deliver an editorial review and publishing system that can be used to submit, review, and publish scholarly articles
First Nations
BC

Increasing First Nations decision-making is key to realizing healthy, self-determining and vibrant BC First Nations children, families and communities. This year was marked with significant and historic First Nations decisions regarding health.

On May 26th in Richmond, BC, First Nations leadership endorsed the 2011 Consensus Paper and Resolution 2011-01. This historic moment set the stage for the First Nations Health Society to sign the BC First Nations Tripartite Agreement on First Nation Health Governance on October 11th, 2011.

The building of our own First Nations Health governance and organiza- tional structure will take time. Today we are in the transition stage and there is a great deal of excitement and many unknowns. We are estab- lishing new and stronger relationships with the provincial and federal governments and working with senior officials to make improvements to today’s health system. This part of the work will form the foundation for the important work to come.

Evidence-based practice
Canada

Antibiotic resistance is an issue health practitioners around the world face daily. An ongoing Canadian initiative, AntibioticAwareness.ca is coordinated by numerous health-related organizations across the country. These groups partnered last year to promote the first Antibiotic Awareness Day in Canada. That promotion extended to a week of activities during a Antibiotic Awareness Week, November 14-20, 2011.

Evidence-based practice
BC

Bugs & Drugs is an antimicrobial reference guide for healthcare professionals.

For more information about the guide, including how to order a hard copy or iPhone app, as well as links to new content, see the Bugs & Drugs main page.

Complimentary hard copies are no longer available, but BC physicians and BC Nurse Practitioners can order a complimentary iPhone application. Android applications may be purchased through Google Play.

Advanced Practice Nursing
Canada

This site is a compendium of tools used in APN related research.Along with the name and reference of the tool, we've listed:• Psychometric properties•Other APN studies that have used the tool •Author contact information•Where available, a PDF of the toolYou can browse the tools using the Main Menu on the left, or click here.When using instruments in your work, please acknowledge the authors by citing their original work and contact them for permission to use or modify where indicated. Please note: The development of the toolkit remains in progress. More instruments will be added as summaries are completed.

Open Access Journal
Ontario

Aporia is dedicated to scholarly debates in nursing and the health sciences. The journal is committed to a pluralistic view of science and to the blurring of boundaries between disciplines. Aporia encourages the use of a wide range of epistemologies, philosophies, theoretical perspectives and research methodologies. In the critical analyses of health-related matters, Aporia advocates and embraces a wide range of epistemologies, philosophies and theories including but not limited to: cultural studies, feminism(s), neo-marxism, postmodernism, poststructuralism, postcolonialism and queer studies.

Advanced Practice Nursing
International

The Nurse Practitioner Show discusses relevant topics utilizing translational research to improve patient outcomes. Topics include evidence-based practice in the clinical setting, interprofessional collaboration, with strategies to improve public health, disease prevention, health promotion, health policy efforts, and advance nursing practice.

HSR Centre
Canada

Health services research

The rising costs of medical advances mean that publicly funded systems have difficulty paying for every new treatment that becomes available. The costs mean that managers and providers of health services have to make choices about which programmes to fund. These decisions relate to whether the programmes are required, whether they are beneficial, and whether they may be improved upon. Research that informs such decisions is known as Health Services Research, which can be divided into needs assessment, economic evaluation, and overall programme evaluation.

Grant-writing
Canada

The objective of these guidelines is to assist both new and veteran investigators to optimize their chances of successfully competing in a peer-reviewed grant application competition. It is a competition. With success rates falling to 50% or below, the difference between success and failure often results, not just from the quality of the science, but from the quality of the grant application. In all probability, the quality of science of the applications in the 10% below the cut-off for funding by an agency is not significantly different from that in the 10% just above the cut-off. "Grantsmanship" can make the difference.

International

NIOSH Science Blog

Nursing assistants are a critical part of the dedicated staff who work day and night in nursing homes to keep residents safe, secure, cared-for, and comfortable. Yet the very workers ensuring the safety of our seniors are themselves at risk for workplace violence and assaults.

Recent NIOSH research based on the first large, nationally representative sample of nursing assistants reported that that nursing assistants in nursing homes have a high rate of work-related physical injuries from assault.1 Overall, 35% of nursing assistants reported physical injuries resulting from aggression by residents, and 12% reported experiencing a human bite during the year before the interview. Nursing assistants employed at nursing homes with special units for Alzheimer patients had a significantly elevated risk for assault injuries and human bites (37% reported injuries from assaults and 13% reported human bites).
 

Knowledge Translation
International

Following on from the lists of academic tweeters published earlier this month, we have put together a short guide to using Twitter in university research, teaching, and impact activities, available to download as a PDF or view on Issuu.

How can Twitter, which limits users to 140 characters per tweet, have any relevance to universities and academia, where journal articles are 3,000 to 8,000 words long, and where books contain 80,000 words? Can anything of academic value ever be said in just 140 characters?

We have put together a short guide answering these questions, showing new users how to get started on Twitter and hone their tweeting style, as well as offering advice to more experienced users on how to use Twitter for research projects, alongside blogging, and for use in teaching.
 

Association
BC

The BC Academic Health Council is a not-for-profit organization linking the healthcare and advanced education sectors. Goals determined by members include facilitating collaboration, communication and knowledge brokering between the health and education sectors and supporting initiatives that address provincial system goals and objectives. The Academic Health Council supports initiatives that enhance the educational preparation of healthcare providers for practice in rural and aboriginal communities, in collaborative interprofessional practice settings and for other key healthcare strategies. The Council has achieved national and international recognition for their programs and initiatives.  The BC Academic Health Council evolved from a proposal the Council of University Teaching Hospitals (COUTH) made to British Columbia's Health Authorities. In that proposal, COUTH recommended the Health Authorities consider forming an organization to link research, education and practice across the province. The Council was formed, consisting of member organizations that include health authorities, post-secondary institutions and government ministries. In the years since BCAHC was formed, it has become a unique and successful strategic forum designed to facilitate collaboration between healthcare and post-secondary education at a province wide level.
 

Database
BC

In support of Healthy Families BC Communities, PHSA-PPH developed the BC Community Health Profiles in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, the Union of BC Municipalities, all regional health authorities, and BC Healthy Communities Society’s PlanH program. The profiles provide local data for use by health authorities and local governments to support collaborative community health planning.

The BC Community Health Profiles provide an introduction to community health data and present data at the lowest geographic level available (census sub-division or local health area level, whenever possible). Profiles have been generated for 130 incorporated municipalities in B.C. (all communities that had sufficient data available) and are not meant to replace the comprehensive local health area profiles that are developed by regional health authorities.

Network
BC

BCEOHRN will be recognized and respected as providing national leadership in occupational and environmental health research which will ultimately protect human health.

In order to achieve our Vision, BCEOHRN’s Mission is:

* To facilitate interdisciplinary occupational and environmental health research through connecting and supporting people to create excellence in education and research results’ dissemination;

* To foster a truly provincial network that creates new efficiencies, partnerships and opportunities that will make BC a magnet for training, attracting and retaining top quality researchers.
 

Research Resources
BC

The BC Ethics Harmonization Initiative (BCEHI) aims to create efficient, coordinated, and high-quality processes that support and encourage multi-jurisdictional human health research. The goal is to make BC a more attractive environment for research activity.

Research Project
BC

Vision: To make BC an attractive environment in which to do health research that involves multiple sites, regions and populations.

First Nations
Canada

Shared Vision

The Partners have a shared vision; this vision represents the place to which we are travelling on this shared journey. The vision is a future where BC First Nations people and communities are among the healthiest in the world. We envision healthy and vibrant BC First Nations children, families, and communities playing an active role in decision-making regarding their personal and collective wellness. We see healthy First Nations people living in healthy communities, drawing upon the richness of their traditions of health and well-being. In this vision, First Nations people and communities have access to high quality health services that are responsive to their needs, and address their realities. These services are part of a broader wellness system – a system that does not treat illness in isolation. These services are delivered in a manner that respects the diversity, cultures, languages, and contributions of BC First Nations 

Patient Safety
BC

The BC Health Quality Matrix is a framework aimed at providing a common language and understanding about health care quality.While the BC Health Quality Matrix is based on well-known frameworks in Canada and the USA, it has been customized to the BC context by the BC Patient Safety & Quality Council’s Health Quality Network.2 The intent of the BC Health Quality Matrix is that it may be used by health care delivery organizations, leaders and practitioners for strategic planning, quality improvement program planning, measurement and evaluation at a program, facility and system-wide level.

BC

The BC Health Quality Matrix was created through the collaboration of the BC Health Quality Network to provide a common understanding and framework for defining the quality of care. The Handbook is a guide to demonstrate the various uses of the Matrix.

Association
BC

A provincial health research strategy will help shape a more comprehensive, coordinated and systems-oriented approach to health research in BC.

March and April have seen the consultation plan for the BC health research strategy move into action. In March, small working groups reviewed the five strategic directions proposed as a framework for the strategy and offered input into the rationale, current status, and potential actions for each.

BC

The Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research is facilitating the development of a provincial
strategy health research strategy aimed at:

  • Identifying specific actionsfor collaborative implementation by the health research community.
  • Providing a framework fromwhich BC organizations can develop their own plans.

This document summarizes five focus sessions held with members of the health research community to
discuss five draft directions developed for the strategy.

Research Report
BC

Health research and health-care leaders met in 2012 to discuss the potential of a health research strategy to shape a more comprehensive, coordinated and systems-oriented approach to health research in BC. Participants agreed on the need for such a strategy, and endorsed the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research to consult with the community and facilitate its development.  Development of the strategy involved multiple phases of consultation, including a survey to solicit feedback on the emerging strategy from a broad cross-section of BC health research stakeholders. The survey tested three elements of the strategy: a draft vision and goals, potential provincial level actions, and key research program gaps that a provincial health research strategy could help address. This document summarizes the findings of the online survey, which was conducted in June 2013. 

Association
BC

BCNPA is a non-profit, volunteer-run, professional organization that supports and advances the professional interests of its membership — nurse practitioners, nurse practitioner students, and nurses who have an interest in the NP practice — enabling NPs to provide accessible, efficient and effective healthcare that meets the highest standards of practice across the NP practice.

We support NP clinical education by sponsoring opportunities pertinent to all streams of NP practice in BC that are provided by local and international healthcare experts.

Patient Safety
BC

The purpose of the British Columbia Patient Safety & Quality Council is to provide advice and make recommendations to the Minister of Health Services on matters related to patient safety and quality of care, and to bring health system stakeholders together in a collaborative partnership to promote and inform a provincially coordinated, innovative, and patient-centred approach to patient safety and quality improvement in British Columbia.

Education Module
BC

The Culture Change Toolbox is a collection of tools and interventions for changing culture. It’s full of ideas, examples, and exercises. For each tool there are tips on how to apply it and a description of which components of culture it helps to improve.

BC

These materials have been developed by the Ministry of Health to provide information in respect of the public health system in British Columbia. It does not purport to be an exhaustive description of all aspects of public health, and persons who are interested in learning more about the matters in these materials are invited to follow the bibliography and links at the end of the modules, and to make further inquiries from other sources as well.

Professional Development
BC

A key component of the BC Provincial Renal Agency (BCPRA) mandate is to support knowledge-development through research and teaching, as well as succession planning within the broader renal network.

UBC Division of Nephrology Province-Wide Rounds are held throughout the year on a variety of renal care topics. Rounds are hosted at St. Paul's Hospital or Vancouver General Hospital and videoconferenced to ten sites around the province.

Local and invited speakers present to an audience that includes staff nephrologists, fellows, residents, visiting medical students, renal nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, social workers, and other healthcare professionals.

Program Evaluation
BC

The BC Ministry of Health’s Clinical Care Management (CCM) initiative provides a case study for how to
achieve large-scale change within the complexity of BC’s health system. A study by the InSource Research Group used a systems perspective to look at factors that help or hinder province-wide implementation of clinical guidelines in varying contexts, with a broader goal of understanding how to better manage large system change.

The study used focus group sessions and interviews with a wide range of individuals with CCM
implementation experience – including clinicians, administrators, senior executives and board members
– from every health authority in the province. Initial findings were validated through an online survey
distributed to a large group of people with CCM implementation experience.  

Informed by the results of this process, two sets of considerations were developed. The first set is focused on CCM implementation and provides action-oriented strategies for improving the success of future CCM initiatives. The second outlines a series of six broad guidelines and supporting strategies for managing large-scale transformation within BC’s health system. 

Professional Development
BC

The Clinician Quality Academy is a professional development program delivered over a seven month period. Participants attend four in-person residency sessions and work on a quality project within their organization or practice. Along the way they receive support through webinars, an assigned Improvement Advisor and expert Faculty.

Curriculum reflects the different roles and perspectives of practicing clinicians in BC, and it is delivered through a model that accommodates their clinical schedules.

BC

The Culture Change Toolbox is a collection of tools and interventions for changing culture. It’s full of ideas, examples, and exercises. For each tool there are tips on how to apply it and a description of which components of culture it helps to improve.

Knowledge Translation
BC

An Introductory Guide Learn How to Tweet & Why You Should Consider Doing So

Social media initially began as a tool for personal communication and included platforms such as Facebook, blogging, Flickr, Twitter and YouTube. More recently, social media has seen an explosion in its use by organizations and other professional-focused tools have come on to the scene including LinkedIn and email newsletter software such as MailChimp.  This fast growth has created an pportunity
for organizations to deliver information directly to people who want to receive it, without having to purchase advertising, hope for media coverage, etc.

Conference Presentations
Alberta

As part of Alberta Health Services (AHS) Strategic Health Needs Assessment and Service Design 2030 project, the Institute of Health Economics has been commissioned to conduct three Knowledge Exchange events. The first of the Knowledge Exchange events: Becoming the Best: Building Sustainability - Game Changing Health Innovations was held on February 24th, 2011. The event was supported by Alberta Health Services in collaboration with Alberta Health and Wellness. Below are video records and powerpoint presentations provided at the event.
 

Research Resources
International

This Briefing looks at the role and value of research, in particular health services research, and explores the virtues and rewards to NHS organisations of being a good research partner.

Research Project
International

Presenters Steve and Joelle shared experiences adapting and implementing the bellwether methodology for use in two advocacy-related projects: evaluation of a communication campaign designed to deliver messages to local decision makers that promote library funding and prospective evaluation of an education reform campaign.

Evidence-based practice
Canada

Recently I read a research paper that talked about better outcomes through working in health care teams. I am fascinated how far too often research validates obvious common sense. Don’t misunderstand me – I am a very strong supporter of research and knowledge development and I often have written about the importance of evidence-based decision-making both for clinical care and system design. But let’s get real…. working in teams makes total sense if the teams are pulling in the same direction (like Canadian Geese flying in the V formation to build speed).

Research Project
International

In November 2010, The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) commissioned the leadership team of John W. Creswell, Ann Klassen, Vicki L. Plano Clark, and Katherine Clegg Smith to develop a resource that would provide guidance to NIH investigators on how to rigorously develop and evaluate mixed methods research applications. Pursuant to this, the team developed a report of "best practices" following three major objectives.

To develop practices that:

  • assist investigators using mixed methods as they develop competitive applications for support from NIH;
  • assist reviewers and staff for review panels at NIH who evaluate applications that include mixed methods research;
  • provide the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), and the NIH Institutes and Centers, with "best practices" to use as they consider potential contributions of mixed methods research, select reviewers, plan new initiatives, and set priority areas for their science.

OBSSR convened a Working Group of 19 individuals (see Appendix A. NIH Working Group on Developing Best Practices for Mixed Methods Research) to review a preliminary draft of "best practices". This Group was comprised of experienced scientists, research methodologists, and NIH health scientists. These individuals were selected because of their expertise in NIH investigations, their specific knowledge of mixed methods research, and their experience in the scientific review process. The composition of the Working Group was diverse with members representing fields such as public health, medicine, mental health professions, psychology, sociology, anthropology, social work, education, and nursing. This Working Group met in late April 2011, and reviewed and made recommendations for the final document presented in this report.

Research Report
BC

On Jan. 15, 2014, the British Columbia Ministry of Health and the Michael Smith Foundation
for Health Research held a forum to examine best practices in home care services for seniors.
The forum, hosted in Vancouver, brought B.C. government representatives, health authority
leaders and researchers together with international experts in research and policy.
The goal of the forum was to provide an opportunity for B.C. participants to learn how other
jurisdictions are addressing the shared challenge of providing sustainable home care for
seniors. The key objectives were:

  • To discuss the driving forces for reforms in home care for seniors and strategies currently underway.
  • To examine what changes are underway in how home care is organized, financed, provided, governed, regulated and assessed.
  • To look at the evidence that exists in other jurisdictions as a way of showing the effect of system-level policy changes to home care and to the outcomes for seniors and their caregivers
Knowledge Translation
International

Agency for Healthcare Research an Quality (AHRQ)

The purpose of the Best Practices in Public Reporting series is to provide practical approaches to designing public reports that make health care performance information clear, meaningful, and usable by consumers.

Report 1: How To Effectively Present Health Care Performance Data To Consumers
Report 2: Effective use of explanatory information
Report 3: Maximizing public awareness

Care delivery innovation
International

Physicians need rapid access to the best current evidence on a wide range of clinical topics. But where to find it? Textbooks are frequently out-of-date, and we don't have the time to perform literature reviews while the patient is waiting.

BETs were developed in the Emergency Department of Manchester Royal Infirmary, UK, to provide rapid evidence-based answers to real-life clinical questions, using a systematic approach to reviewing the literature. BETs take into account the shortcomings of much current evidence, allowing physicians to make the best of what there is. Although BETs initially had an emergency medicine focus, there are a significant number of BETs covering cardiothoracics, nursing, primary care and paediatrics.

Program Evaluation
International

An international collaboration to improve evaluation practice and theory by sharing information about options (methods or tools) and approaches.

Evidence-based practice
Ontario

Broken hip can have a major impact on an older person's health and ability to live independently. But researcher Kathy McGilton doesn't believe it has to be this way — and improving the situation will require reshaping the beliefs of health care professionals.

A professor in U of T's Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing and the Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, McGilton is also a senior scientist at Toronto Rehab. So she fully appreciates how a practitioner's outlook can ultimately affect an older patient's outcome.

"Nobody wants to get old," McGilton says. "Our society is so focused on staying young that this thinking infiltrates our attitudes as health professionals and undermines our clinical practice."

Evidence-based practice
Canada

Better Together: Partnering with Families is a North American campaign encouraging hospitals to review their visiting policies with a view to adopting family presence policies. Family presence enables patients to designate family members and loved ones who can stay by their side 24 hours a day, seven days a week. This approach creates a welcoming environment that enables family and caregivers to more fully participate in patient care by being present for physician rounds and helping with transitions in care.

Care delivery innovation
International

This booklet looks at a new policy direction for health, introduced two years ago, which creates an environment where health professionals in the community are actively encouraged to work with one another, and with hospital-based clinicians to deliver health care in a co-ordinated and co-operative manner so that more services are delivered in the community, people wait less for services and are kept healthier in the community.

Treatments which were once hospital-only are increasingly being performed in the community by GPs and practice nurses who have received additional training from hospital specialists. Examples you’ll see in this booklet include intravenous antibiotics to treat the serious skin disease cellulitis, surgery to remove skin lesions and giving GPs direct access to diagnostic imaging (instead of having to refer patients to hospital for that imaging).
 

Patient Safety
International

Each year, more than 3 million people receive care in nursing homes – a 10% increase over the past 10 years. As this population has grown, we have seen a decline in another area – a 16% drop in the number of nursing home beds. How can more people be receiving care when beds are decreasing?

Evidence-based practice
International

Aimed at fostering the broad adoption of effective health care interventions, this report proposes a blueprint for improving the dissemination of best practices by national quality improvement campaigns. The blueprint's eight key strategies are to: 1) highlight the evidence base and relative simplicity of recommended practices; 2) align campaigns with strategic goals of adopting organizations; 3) increase recruitment by integrating opinion leaders into the enrollment process; 4) form a coalition of credible campaign sponsors; 5) generate a threshold of participating organizations that maximizes network exchanges; 6) develop practical implementation tools and guides for key stakeholder groups; 7) create networks to foster learning opportunities; and 8) incorporate monitoring and evaluation of milestones and goals. The impact of quality campaigns also depends on contextual factors, including the nature of the innovation itself, external environmental incentives, and features of adopting organizations.

BC

I am joined on the “balcony of personal reflection” by President/CEO and Researcher Diane Finegood. We begin discussing the difference between research and evaluation. Diane shares... She was privileged to be at the heart of the transformation of our health research system, as an inaugural Scientific Director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). The role was to foster the discovery of new knowledge and its translation into improved health. She came into that role with the experience of a successful basic scientist and came by the question “What is the difference between research and evaluation?”

Journal
International

BMJ Open is an online-only, open access general medical journal, dedicated to publishing medical research from all disciplines and therapeutic areas. The journal publishes all research study types, from study protocols to phase I trials to meta-analyses, including small or potentially low-impact studies. Publishing procedures are built around fully open peer review and continuous publication, publishing research online as soon as the article is ready.

BMJ Open aims to promote transparency in the publication process by publishing reviewer reports and previous versions of manuscripts as pre-publication histories. Authors are asked to pay article-processing charges on acceptance; the ability to pay does not influence editorial decisions.
 

Knowledge Translation
International

Traditional textbooks on research methods tend to ignore, or gloss over, how research questions are constructed. In this text, Mats Alvesson & Jorgen Sandberg seek to challenge researchers to look past the easy or obvious choices and create more interesting and rewarding questions. Joanna Lenihan feels that this is potentially a valuable and practical tool for researchers and could be integrated into required reading for research students in the humanities and social sciences embarking on research.

Professional Development
International

Social Fairness at Work
 

Have you discovered how to advance people, solve real world problems and enjoy growth, simultaneously?

Wherever ongoing wellbeing follows, you’ve likely bumped smack into social fairness. Want a quick test of the fairness levels where you work?

Ask people without authority how they see themselves advancing and question what holds them back. Or invite the disabled folks in your community to discuss growth opportunities from their perspective. Then get ready to run in a few new directions.
 

Knowledge Translation
International

This article aims at advancing the still on-going conversations about the so-called research/practice gap. Some academics argue that it is not possible to develop knowledge that is both academically valuable and helpful for practice, while others hold the opposite view, justifying it on the basis of works published in top tier journals. The paper argues that the main reason scholars hold such contradictory views on this topic central to management science is the lack of explicitness of a number of founding assumptions which underlie their discourses, in particular the lack of explicitness of the epistemological framework in which the parties’ arguments are anchored.

The paper presents methodological guidelines for elaborating scientific knowledge both from and for practice, and illustrates how to use these guidelines on examples from a published longitudinal research project. In order to avoid the lack of explicitness pitfall, the paper specifies scientific and epistemological frameworks in which the knowledge elaborated in this methodological approach, when properly justified, can be considered as legitimate scientific knowledge.
 

Academic Nursing
BC

The Nursing Leadership Institute (NLI), is a collaborative initiative between the BC Ministry of Health, the BC Chief Nursing Officers (CNOs), and the University of British Columbia to support nursing leadership in British Columbia. The NLI is funded by the Ministry of Health, specifically through the Nursing Directorate.

Housed in and administered by the UBC School of Nursing, the NLI aims to:

  • Build the leadership/management competencies of first line nurse leaders in BC
  • Enhance leadership/management performance and job satisfaction of these nurse leaders
  • Increase nursing staff satisfaction with nursing leadership

The NLI consists of a four-day residential workshop away from the work environment. The workshop provides:

  • An introduction to core leadership and management competencies for first-line nurse managers
  • Networking and discussion time among participants
  • Portfolio development with a focus on learning goals/objectives
  • Project planning with mentors

After NLI participants return to their practice settings, they continue to meet on a regular basis with their mentors. These mentors are experienced leaders from middle or executive levels within their organizations. Mentor-mentee teams work on healthcare projects that can be realistically completed over the course of a year. Project work and mentor support provide valuable 'on-the-job' leadership learning for first-line nurse leaders. In the work environment, NLI participants get to practice what they've learned at the workshop. They are also encouraged to showcase their work in project portfolios. A goal of the NLI is to host annual "Celebration Days" for NLI participants to share their portfolios and leadership experiences with each other.

First-line nursing managers are selected by their Chief Nursing Officers based on specific criteria. These criteria include less than 3 years experience in a first line nursing leadership position, or being recognised as having enthusiasm and abilities for nursing leadership and management.

If you are interested in attending the Nursing Leadership Institute (NLI), we encourage you to let your Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) and/or supervisor know of your interest.

Program Evaluation
International

Transformational-change initiatives have a dismal track record. In 1996, Harvard Business School professor John Kotter claimed that nearly 70 percent of large-scale change programs didn’t meet their goals,1 and virtually every survey since has shown similar results. Why is change so confounding? We don’t think the issue lies with an understanding of its building blocks—Kotter’s classic eight-step change-management model is still a helpful guide. The problem lies in beliefs about who is responsible for launching change and how change is implemented.

Knowledge Translation
International

Elizabeth Harrison, Eleanor Jew, Thomas Smith, Iqbal Ahmed and Sarah Peck present the recommendations from a recent conference for early-career researchers on bridging the gap in development research, policy and practice. Participants were encouraged to consider partnership-based solutions to development problems. From having a realistic understanding of intended outcomes to formulating relevant research questions, constructive debate took place on how best to navigate and undertake practical solutions to developing dialogue across sectors.

Research Resources
Canada

A special issue of Healthcare Policy articulates the experiences, successes, challenges and lessons learned in the RTC journey.
 

Canada

Author(s): Graham Lowe
Published By: Qmentum Quarterly (Accreditation Canada)

This article outlines how health care employers can be leaders in creating healthy, humanly sustainable organizations. Doing so will benefit patients, employees and physicians, and society.
 

Canada

This report marks the culmination of the Nursing Sector Study. The five year study consisted of two phases, and examined the nursing workforce for all three regulated nursing professions in Canada (Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) Registered Nurses (RN), and Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN)). Phase I, which concluded in December 2004, examined the state of nursing human resources in Canada. A series of 15 technical research reports were completed which covered areas such as nursing mobility, the international labour market, nursing education in Canada, and many others.

Conference Presentations
Canada

The 2010 CAHSPR Conference was a great success! We are happy to announce that attendance was record-breaking, and we are looking forward to seeing everyone for the 2011 CAHSPR Conference in Halifax, NS

Conference Documents and Presentations from our 2010 CAHSPR Conference are available below. If you have any questions, please feel free to email us!

 

HSR Centre
International

The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a collaboration between the University of Cambridge Health Services Research Group at the Institute of Public Health and the Health and Healthcare Group at RAND Europe. We aim to inform policy through evidence-based research on health services in the UK and internationally.

Canada

The Collaborative secured its first project funding from the 2008 Knowledge Translation Competition as advanced by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). The knowledge synthesis was conducted from January 2009 to January 2010 and examined current evidence on the impact of IPE and collaborative practice on HHR outcomes.

We synthesized the evidence from a number of sources such as the peer-reviewd literature, reports from governments and other agencies and reports from projects conducted under Health Canada’s Interprofessional Education for Collaborative Patient-Centred Practice (IECPCP) initiative.

Four areas of impact emerged:

1. Workplace quality
2. Provider satisfaction
3. Student clinical placement & graduate employment choice
4. Cost benefits

The executive summary and full synthesis report is now available.

eHealth Resources
Canada

Information about electronic health records for nurses with a collection of links to learn more about this topic.

Research Report
Canada

Should Canada achieve a whole that is greater that the sum of its parts?

Proceedings Report and Commentary on the National Symposium on Quality Improvement - Towards a High-Performing Health Care System: The Role of Canada's Quality Councils

Research Resources
Canada

The purpose of CANR is to foster research-based nursing practice and practice-based nursing research by:

  • providing information about research studies, methods, funding and other resources
  • strengthening linkages between research, education, administration,and clinical practice
  • representing members' interests to governments, funding agencies, and other nursing organizations
  • recognizing excellence in research activities
  • educating professionals and the public about the significance of the nursing research-practice partnership

Academic Nursing
Canada

CASN/ACESI (Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing/Association canadienne des écoles de sciences infirmières) is the national voice for nursing education, research, and scholarship and represents baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs in Canada.

The objectives of CASN/ACESI are:

To lead nursing education and nursing scholarship in the interest of healthier Canadians.

CASN/ACESI:

  • Speaks for Canadian nursing education and scholarship
  • Establishes and promotes national standards of excellence for nursing education
  • Promotes the advancement of nursing knowledge
  • Facilitates the integration of theory, research and practice
  • Contributes to public policy
  • Provides a national forum for issues in nursing education and research
  • CASN/ACESI is a bilingual organization.

CASN/ACESI is . . .

  • a voluntary association
  • representative of all universities and colleges which offer part or all of an undergraduate or graduate degree in nursing
  • the official accrediting agency for university nursing programs in Canada
  • a member of the Association of Accrediting Agencies of Canada (AAAC)
  • a member of the Canadian Consortium for Research and the Network for the Advancement of Health Services Research
  • associated with the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC)
  • a member of national and international networks for discussion of issues in higher education and nursing
Program Evaluation
Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada's Best Practices Portal

Your first step to planning health-related programs. The Portal is a virtual front door to community and population health interventions related to chronic disease prevention and health promotion.
 

Advanced Practice Nursing
Canada

Inside this Issue:
 

Ontario Stakeholder Meeting

Advanced Practice Nurse Outcomes

Research Review

OAPN Research Seminar Series

News and Events

Moving Evidence into Practice

Association
Canada

HealthCareleaders is most frequently known for its continuing professional education offerings including its annual Leadership Conference in October and Community Care Conference in May, both of which draw hundreds of participants from all parts of the province. The Association provides several other services for members.

Evidence-based practice
Canada

aC3KTion Net is the Canadian Critical Care Knowledge Translation Network, a Canadian Institutes of Health Research funded Initiative which seeks to improve the implementation of evidence informed best practices in critical care.

aC3KTion Net will endeavor to fill a void in Canadian Critical Care Knowledge Translation by creating a web-based Network of critical care stakeholders, researchers and knowledge users to optimize resources and support collaborative KT activities. Ultimately aC3KTion Net will enable Canadian Critical Care communities to have access to evidence informed best practices in a timely and efficient manner. Our goal is to reduce the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients and their impact on the Canadian health care system.

Evidence-based practice
Canada

CDA is helping you provide patient-centered diabetes care and chronic disease management.

Program Evaluation
Canada

This zone of the CES Web site offers access to unpublished documents (also referred to as Grey Literature) which may be of interest to evaluators.

Conference Presentations
Canada

This document presents an overview of the experiences that were shared at this interprovincial-territorial meeting on HIA. 

Conference Presentations
Canada

This document presents an overview of the experiences that were shared at this interprovincial-territorial meeting on HIA.

On April 18, 2013, the NCCHPP held a second interprovincial-territorial meeting to discuss the subject of HIA....

This meeting had two main objectives:

  1. Allow participants from the various Canadian provinces and territories to share their knowledge and experience relative to the use of HIA implementation strategies as mechanisms for integrating health in all policies (HiAP); 
  2. Discuss various government strategies for integrating health in all policies, as well as conditions for success and barriers to achieving this.

This report provides an overview of the experiences that were shared at this meeting and describes the main issues that gave rise to discussion.  

Care delivery innovation
Canada

The story of healthcare in Canada today is one of growing numbers of chronically ill patients poorly served by a system designed for acute, episodic care. Changing that story is essential. But is it possible? And how?

The solution, it’s generally agreed, lies in community-based, multidisciplinary teams dedicated to the care of chronically ill people who face multiple health challenges but respond to well-managed, co-ordinated care. Integrated care delivered by teams with a patient-centred focus that emphasizes self-management is the key to keeping the chronically ill from the recurrent crises that send them back to hospital. But how can that world be created?

This was the subject of the 2012 CEO Forum, organized by the Canadian Foundation for Health Improvement in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information, the Canadian Nurses Association, the Canadian Medical Association, and the Association of Canadian Academic Healthcare Organizations. Each year, the forum brings together health leaders from across the country to share strategies for improving healthcare.
 

HSR Resources & Funding
Canada

Humans respond fairly predictably to economic incentives. Like mice in a maze, if someone moves the cheddar, we’ll probably change course. So by putting a nickel here and removing a dime there, those that determine our income can tweak our behaviours to produce specific results. At the same time, we’re not always at the whim of the almighty dollar. The resourceful among us often find ways of using the payment scheme to their advantage.

In healthcare, payment schemes are always contentious. When governments start talking about new ways of funding hospitals, the costliest component of healthcare in Canada,[1] some get wary. Activity-based funding (ABF), a scheme that pays hospitals on the basis of “activities” performed, rather than the traditional lump sum per year, is a prime example.[2] Critics fear that ABF may be a stepping stone toward greater for-profit* hospital care in Canada,[3] may lead to rural hospital closures and could be a disincentive for hospitals to provide much-needed, but high cost per unit, care.[4] After close inspection, the evidence and expert commentary suggest that ABF can be employed in ways that benefit patients, increase transparency and lead to more efficient use of hospital resources.
 

Program Evaluation
Canada

Canada’s healthcare system faces mounting pressure as the population ages and the prevalence of chronic conditions continues to rise. The traditional focus on providing complex and chronic disease care within the acute setting is contributing to already existing pressures on wait times, alternate level of care days, and patient access and flow. In response to these challenges, and the recognition that the acute setting may not be optimal for providing patient-focused chronic care, many provincial health ministries and healthcare organizations are launching initiatives to better manage complex chronic conditions in the community and improve the patient care experience.

HSR Resources & Funding
Canada

CFHI's reports and papers related to health services research.

Evidence-based practice
Canada

The seventh annual, 2013 CEO Forum promoted dialogue on implementation strategies for achieving efficiencies, improving disease management, and introducing new technologies, all through the lens of being patient- and family-centred. The Forum was chaired by Dr. Terrence Sullivan. Joining a group of esteemed healthcare leaders as presenters and panellists at the event is The Honourable Fred Horne, Minister of Health, Alberta.

Program Evaluation
Canada

This year's Canadian Health Accreditation Report focuses on governance and its relationship to quality and patient safety. Data collected from the application of Accreditation Canada's Governance Standards and the Governance Functioning Tool survey for board members provide a comprehensive picture of governance in Canadian health care.
 

Network
Canada

The Pan-Canadian Health Human Resources Network is inviting all Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Students doing a dissertation or post-doctoral fellowship on topics related to Health Human Resources to join our network and spotlight your dissertation or post-doctoral fellowship research topic on our website.
 

eHealth Resource
Canada

C-HOBIC introduces a systematic, structured language to admission and discharge assessments of patients receiving acute care, complex continuing care, long-term care or home care. This language can be abstracted into provincial databases or EHRs. C-HOBIC builds on the Ontario HOBIC (Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care) program.

Education Module
Canada

Welcome to CHA Learning

CHA Learning, the Canadian Healthcare Association's distance learning provider, has offered professional development opportunities to healthcare professionals from across Canada for over 55 years. Every year, between 500 and 600 adult learners take advantage of CHA Learning's distance learning offerings to broaden their knowledge base within their chosen careers. Courses range from food services management, health information management, general healthcare management, to quality improvement, long term care management, and risk management and safety in health services.

Evidence-based practice
Canada

The Canadian Injury Prevention Resource is the result of the vision and collaboration of the Canadian Collaborating Centres on Injury Prevention (CCCIP) network and its members, and is made possible by the valuable support and financial resources of the Public Health Agency of Canada.

The Canadian Injury Prevention Resource (CIPR) is a comprehensive, timely, and evidence-based overview of injury prevention in Canada. The Resource has over 500 pages of content from over 60 contributing authors reflecting the Canadian experience around injury prevention, and aims to provide both individuals and Injury Prevention (IP) practitioners with basic understanding of the area. The evidence-informed content is intended to promote effective initiatives throughout the IP field and builds upon Canadian context using Canadian materials, examples, statistics and case studies.

 

Canada

Healthy Workplace Tools

Injury Prevention Information

Workplace Mental Health Tools

Government Resources

Organizations

Magazines

Network
Canada

The Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative promotes collaboration in health and education. We are educators, policymakers, health providers, students and citizens who are committed to changing the healthcare system for the better. Membership is free to everyone with an interest in making lasting changes to Canadian heathcare.

Knowledge Translation
Canada

The Canadian Knowledge Transfer and Exchange Community of Practice (KTECOP) is a network of KTE practitioners and researchers who share KTE practices and experience, build peer relationships for information exchange and support, build KTE capacity, advance knowledge of KTE effectiveness, and share KTE events, job opportunities and other related KTE activities

Conference Presentations
Canada

2012 Conference Resources

Conference Chair, Lloyd Craig, shared the top five priorities for psychologically safe and healthy workplaces.

Notes from delegates' morning discussion.

Notes from delegates' afternoon discussion.

In our morning program, Dr. Ali Dastmalchian and Claudia Steinke provided an overview of studies on workplace health promotion, key factors that contribute to better outcomes and the role of empowerment in implementing change.

In our afternoon program, Dr. Joti Samra offered an overview of several free resources available to help employers and employees assess, improve and maintain mental health.

This conference workshop from CMHA's Mental Health Works initiative provided delegates with skills to recognize when a worker may be struggling with a mental health issue, more effectively discuss sensitive issues with employees, and create accommodation strategies that work.

In our conference workshop, LCol Stéphane Grenier provided an understanding of the value of involvement of people living—and working—with mental health issues in dealing with mental health challenges within the workplace environment.

  • 5 priority elements, and moving to standards, for psychologically safe and psychologically healthy workplaces (184KB PDF)
  • Delegates' Priority Steps for Building Their Psychologically Healthy Workplace
  • What Delegates Committed to Take to Their Workplaces
  • Promoting psychological health in organizations: a focus on workplace relations (519KB PDF)
  • Resources to Help You build Your Psychologically Healthy Workplace (1.5MB PDF)
  • Complex Issues. Clear Solutions
  • Building Peer Support Networks in the Workplace (1.21MB PDF)
Statistical Resources
Canada

Understanding how hospital financial information changes over time is critical to evaluating hospital performance. Canadian MIS Database, Hospital Financial Performance Indicators, 1999-2000 to 2008-2009 reports on regional level hospital performance using 2008-2009 data. This report is an update to information previously reported in Canadian MIS Database, Hospital Financial Performance Indicators 1999-2000 to 2008-2009. CIHI will continue to monitor the ongoing feasibility of using data from the CMDB in the future to produce and report any additional indicators

The indicators that are used in this report are:

  • Total Margin
  • Current Ratio
  • Administrative Expense as a Percentage of Total Expense
  • Information Systems as a Percentage of Total Expense
  • Cost per Weighted Case
  • Unit-producing Personnel Worked Hours for Patient Care Functional Centres as a Percentage of Total Worked Hours
  • Nursing Inpatient Services Unit-producing Personnel Worked Hours per Weighted Case
  • Diagnostic Services Unit-producing Personnel Worked Hours per Weighted Case
  • Clinical Laboratory Unit-producing Personnel Worked Hours per Weighted Case
  • Pharmacy Unit-producing Personnel Worked Hours per Weighted Case
  • Average Age of Equipment
Association
Canada

Listing of Canadian nursing specialty assocations with contacts.

Advanced Practice Nursing
Canada

The respective executive directors of the registered nursing regulatory bodies in Canada requested the Canadian Nurses Association and Canada’s Testing Company, Assessment Strategies Inc., to facilitate the update and revision of the core entry-level competencies for nurse practitioner practice in Canada. Through a series of teleconferences, electronic communications, subgroup work and one face-to-face meeting, the Canadian Nurse Practitioner Core Competency Framework (2010) was completed.

The Canadian Nurse Practitioner Core Competency Framework (2010) was developed for use by participating jurisdictions. Each regulatory body may adopt this document or publish the entry-level competencies approved in accordance with their context, policies and requirements. Anyone seeking information about the nurse practitioner competencies that are in effect in a particular province or territory is advised to contact the applicable regulatory body.

Patient Safety
Canada

An insider explains the responsibilities of researchers and reviewers in getting it right.

Care delivery innovation
Canada

With the Staff Mix Decision-making Framework for Quality Nursing Care, you can create the mix of staff that:

  • Responds to client health needs
  • Supports continuity of care and care provider
  • Values quality of worklife
  • Optimizes outcomes for clients, staff and the organization

The framework, funded by the Government of Canada’s Foreign Credential Recognition Program, presents a systematic approach to creating the right mix of health-care staff — specifically, nurses and unregulated care providers. Based on evidence-informed guiding principles, this versatile resource will help you optimize your staff mix configurations to meet the needs of your clients, staff and organization. It will also support your efforts to maximize effective teamwork.
 

Association
Canada

The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) is a federation of 11 provincial and territorial nurses' associations and colleges representing 139,893 registered nurses and nurse practitioners. CNA is the national professional voice of registered nurses, supporting them in their practice and advocating for healthy public policy and a quality, publicly funded, not-for-profit health system.

CNA speaks for Canadian registered nurses and represents Canadian nursing to other organizations and to government nationally and internationally. It gives registered nurses a strong national association through which they can support each other and speak with a powerful, unified voice. It provides registered nurses with a core staff of nursing and health policy consultants and experts in other areas such as communication and testing. CNA provides the exam by which all registered nurses, except in Quebec, are tested to ensure they meet an acceptable level of competence before beginning practice. CNA’s active role in legislative policy influences the health-care decisions that affect nursing professionals every day. It has published a large number of documents, including the Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses.

Professional Development
Canada

CNA encourages the integration of current knowledge into practice environments conducive to quality nursing care. Nursing policy develops national policies on nursing issues such as advanced nursing practice and the nurse practitioner and is involved in a number of initiatives on behalf of nurses. One such project is Achieving Excellence in Professional Practice, a resource guide offering nurses and other professionals assistance in developing or reviewing existing standards.

Journal
Canada

When Private Becomes Public:  The Ethical Challenges and Opportunities of Social Media

The main objectives of this article are to:

  • initiate a conversation about the rules, social norms and etiquette for work-related uses of social media, which are not well established;
  • review ethical challenges and opportunities that arise in various practice settings when nurses use social media, both as individuals and as a collective;
  • re-state the central importance of patient confidentiality and privacy to nursing practice;
  • reinforce the notion that use of social media is not considered in any way “private” but is firmly within the public domain, with a potential audience of many thousands, if not millions; and
  • acknowledge and support nurses’ use of social media in their efforts to promote social justice, while being sensitive to the ethical concerns these forms of communication may raise.
Patient Safety
Canada

The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) was established in 2003 as an independent not-for-profit corporation, operating collaboratively with health professionals and organizations, regulatory bodies and governments to build and advance a safer healthcare system for Canadians. CPSI performs a coordinating and leadership role across health sectors and systems, promotes leading practices and raises awareness with stakeholders, patients and the general public about patient safety.

Care delivery innovation
Canada

Information and support on paliative and end-of-life care, and grief.

eHealth Resources
Canada

Canadians are no strangers to the virtual world, with a Canadian user visiting an average of 3,731 pages every month. It’s no surprise, then that Canadians also head online for health information, and, in fact, 72 per cent of family physicians refer patients to websites for information about their health care and lifestyle. But Canadians don’t just want general information — they also want access to their own health data as well, with more than 80 per cent saying they would like to take advantage of digital health solutions to view lab results and medication history electronically. These are just some of the interesting stats from Canada Health Infoway’s recent Report on Digital Health: Canadians embracing digital health infographic. Download the report and share your thoughts — would you like to access your health information online?

Evidence-based practice
Ontario

The PEBC’s evidence-based guidelines and standards are published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, as well as on CCO’s web site. Cancer Care Ontario built on the PEBC’s well-established expertise in producing clinical guidelines for the care of individual patients to include the development of organizational and system standards that set expectations for organizations delivering cancer services in terms of personnel, expertise, facilities and services.

Network
Ontario

Cancer Care Ontario’s Health Services Research Network conducts health services research with the goal of influencing health policy in Ontario.

Knowledge Translation
Canada

Cancer View Canada connects Canadians to online services, information and resources for cancer control.

It is an ever-evolving portal that brings together resources for cancer prevention, screening, treatment, and supportive, palliative and end-of-life care.

Through its collaborative tools, Cancer View Canada also links people in the Canadian cancer community to each other.

In this section you will find cancer control resources to help those working in the health system.

Academic Nursing
Canada

Mission To foster excellence in the academic nurse educator role, and provide recognition and merit for the specialized knowledge, expertise, and competencies of this role in Canada! Audience:Nurse educators teaching in baccalaureate and/or graduate nursing education programs in Canada, and graduate students interested in pursuing an academic career... 

Knowledge Translation
Canada

Are you health illiterate?

Modern medicine is complicated, which is what smart doctors are for, right? Well, maybe not. More and more experts think the key to better outcomes is a smarter patient - one who is informed about personal health. An article published last week says doctors should dumb down their instructions to patients. I think that idea is even dumber. 

The article - by doctors at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia - says that doctors should assume that in general, patients do not understand medical advice.  In other words, until proven otherwise, doctors should assume that patients are illiterate in health information.  Therefore, they should avoid using medical jargon when explaining diagnosis or treatment to the patient - unless the jargon is essential, in which case it should be explained clearly.  The authors also say that in general, when doctors talk to patients, they should speak or provide written handouts aimed at the grade five or six level.  When speaking, the authors say doctors - should - speak - slowly - and break down information into small manageable steps.  There's a lot more, but you get the drift.

Canada

CBRG QuickDecks is a set of the summary slides describing findings from systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG). These summaries provide clinicians and researchers with a snapshot of evidence on various treatment and prevention measures for back and neck pain.

Evidence-based practice
International

In public health and chronic disease prevention there is increasing priority for effective use of evidence in practice. In Ontario, Canada, despite various models being advanced, public health practitioners are seeking ways to identify and apply evidence in their work in practical and meaningful ways. In a companion article, “Strengthening Chronic Disease Prevention Programming: The Toward Evidence-Informed Practice (TEIP) Program Assessment Tool,” we describe use of a tool to assess and strengthen program planning and implementation processes using 19 criteria derived from best and promising practices literature. In this article, we describe use of a complementary Program Evidence Tool to identify, synthesize, and apply a range of evidence sources to strengthen the content of chronic disease prevention programming.
 

Patient Safety
International

In CDC’s Safe Healthcare Blog, Infection Preventionist Jennie L. Mayfield discusses the ongoing challenges of preventing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Jennie points out that more research is needed to identify practices that prevent transmission of CDI and that infection preventionists need more resources to battle CDI.
 

International

Center for Disease Control moderated blog written by a team of health care professionals on health care safety topics.

Patient Safety
International

In association with the World Health Organization’s "Save Lives: Clean Your Hands" annual initiative, CDC has launched a new “Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings” website. This site provides healthcare workers and patients with a variety of resources including guidelines for providers, patient empowerment materials, the latest technological advances in hand hygiene adherence measurement, frequently asked questions, and links to promotional and educational tools published by the WHO, universities, and health departments.

Patient Safety
International

The past few years have brought heightened awareness of the important role of infection prevention programs and activities in long-term care settings, including nursing homes and assisted living. Navigating all the information available on infection prevention in healthcare facilities can be overwhelming, and it can be particularly difficult to locate available resources that are specific to long-term care settings. To address this need, my CDC colleagues and I have worked to redesign and expand our web-based tools and resources for this important healthcare setting.

Patient Safety
International

A Guide to Assist Health Departments and Healthcare Facilities with Conducting a Patient Notification Following Identification of an Infection Control Lapse or Disease Transmission

Patient Safety
International

This report, Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 gives a first-ever snapshot of the burden and threats posed by the antibiotic-resistant germs having the most impact on human health.

Each year in the United States, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die each year as a direct result of these infections. Many more people die from other conditions that were complicated by an antibiotic-resistant infection.

Antibiotic-resistant infections can happen anywhere. Data show that most happen in the general community; however, most deaths related to antibiotic resistance happen in healthcare settings such as hospitals and nursing homes. 

Professional Development
International

TRAIN is the premier learning resource for professionals who protect the public's health. A free service of the Public Health Foundation, www.train.org is part of the newly expanded TrainingFinder Real-time Affiliate Integrated Network (TRAIN).

CDC TRAIN provides access to learning products for the public health community, which includes public health agencies, as well as hospitals, clinics, private practices, community-based organizations, and individuals who work to improve a population’s health.

Program Evaluation
International

Once the assessment and planning phases have been conducted, and interventions have been selected for implementation, the final stage of designing a workplace health program involves decisions concerning the monitoring and evaluation of program activities. Just as assessment data are critical for evidenced-based program planning and implementation, so too is evaluation to prove that workplace health interventions have been effective and build the business case for continuing them. Ideally, evaluation plans should be developed as part of the planning process and before beginning the intervention activities.

International

Safe Patient Handling

Overextension incidents are the leading source of workers’ compensation claims and costs in healthcare settings. The primary outcome associated with such incidents are musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). MSD risks are found in housekeeping, food service and other areas where workers manually handle heavy, awkward loads or perform repetitive forceful hand work. The single greatest risk factor for MSDs in healthcare workers is the manual moving and repositioning of patients, residents or clients. Rising obesity rates in the United States1 impact the physical demands on caregivers. The aging of the workforce likely contributes to the problem; the average age of a registered nurse in the U.S. is approximately 47 years. Also contributing to the negative health consequences of manual handling is the shortage of nurses—Peter Buerhaus, a researcher at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, has estimated that there will be a shortage of 250,000 nurses by the year 2025 in the US.
 

Patient Safety

Preventing Infections in Healthcare Settings

Knowledge Translation
International

CDC’s E-learning Essentials Guide is designed for course developers and training decision makers who may be new to e-learning. The guide identifies six components essential to quality e-learning and explains how to use them to engage learners in the most effective ways.

Instructional designers and e-learning developers from across CDC are among the subject matter experts consulted for the development of this guide.

The chart below summarizes each component. Click on a component in the left column to go to that section within the guide.
 

Knowledge Translation
International

This workbook can be used by program managers to create success stories that highlight their program’s achievements. Although its examples are from state workers in oral health promotion, the methods for collecting and writing success stories can be applied to any public health program.
 

Healthcare interventions
International

People getting medical care can catch serious infections called health care-associated infections (HAIs). While most types of HAIs are declining, one – caused by the germ C. difficile* – remains at historically high levels. C. difficile causes diarrhea linked to 14,000 American deaths each year. Those most at risk are people, especially older adults, who take antibiotics and also get medical care. When a person takes antibiotics, good germs that protect against infection are destroyed for several months. During this time, patients can get sick from C. difficile picked up from contaminated surfaces or spread from a health care provider's hands. About 25% of C. difficile infections first show symptoms in hospital patients; 75% first show in nursing home patients or in people recently cared for in doctors' offices and clinics. C. difficile infections cost at least $1 billion in extra health care costs annually.

Program Evaluation
International

Members of the public health community are encouraged to make use of the following tools for improving practices around the evaluation of health costs and burden, and health program effectiveness and efficiency. These tools have been created by CDC and its partners. CDC health economists are continually working on new tools, which will be added to this collection.

International

Disinfectants and cleaners are essential products for preventing disease transmission in healthcare facilities, but they pose risks for work-related eye and respiratory irritation, sensitization, asthma-like symptoms, and respiratory distress for workers. A NIOSH study published in the May 14, 2010 Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report provides the first multistate report on work-related symptoms among healthcare staff in three states, with recommendations for preventing illness and injury.

Patient Safety
International

Today, on CDC’s Safe Healthcare Blog, as we recognize International Infection Prevention Week we highlight U.S.-driven healthcare-associated infection prevention and the milestones achieved in 2010. Infection Preventionists continue to search for new ways to design and deliver infection prevention initiatives. What ideas do you have, and what successes have you seen in healthcare facilities?

HSR Centre
International

The Center for Health Systems Research and Analysis (CHSRA) was formed in 1973 as a collaborative effort between the departments of Industrial Engineering and Preventive Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. At CHSRA, researchers seek to improve long-term care and health systems by creating performance measures and developing information and decision support systems. CHSRA research and development projects serve a variety of audiences.

Knowledge Translation
International

Sepsis is a consequence of infection that is difficult to predict, diagnose, and treat. Patients who develop sepsis have an increased risk of complications and death and face higher healthcare costs and longer treatment. CDC is working to increase sepsis awareness and improve treatment among the public, healthcare providers, and healthcare facilities.

Evidence-based practice
Ontario

The Centre for Effective Practice (CEP) is a federally-incorporated, not-for-profit organization enabling appropriate care in primary care through the development and implementation of relevant, evidence-based programs and tools. Founded in 2004 by the Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, CEP works to address the growing gap between best evidence and current primary care practices by identifying barriers to appropriate interprofessional primary care and producing practical solutions to address these barriers. At CEP we work collaboratively with health consumers and leading interprofessional clinicians, academics, researchers, and policy-makers to effectively meet the needs of our clients and primary care practitioners to close the gap between best evidence and current practices. We do this by:

  • Identifying barriers to optimal interprofessional primary care
  • Producing practical solutions to address these barriers
  • Engaging primary care practitioners and their interprofessional teams in the implementation of appropriate care
  • Collaborating with leading partners to increase impact and system-wide changes

Evidence-based practice
Ontario

The goal of this website is to help develop, disseminate, and evaluate resources that can be used to practise and teach EBM for undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing education for health care professionals from a variety of clinical disciplines.

Network
Ontario

We are a group of people whose common vision and passion it is to improve health for all using information and communication technologies. Touched by the broad spectrum of players that can elicit changes in health, we work tirelessly with multi-disciplinary and international leaders from the social sciences, technology and health fields to transform health systems around the globe.

Network
International

A new and exciting virtual space to inspire and enable nurses to lead innovation and change in nursing and healthcare practice to improve patient care.

Canada

Best practices and guides for safe manual handling of patients

This page has been prepared as a resource for those interested in approaches to the manual handling of patients and prevention of injury. It is not intended to be exhaustive but should still serve as a starting point for more detailed investigations.

Professional Development
BC

Today’s society has a growing interest in maintaining and improving the health of entire populations.

As a result, there is a need for trained professionals who understand the intricacies of population health, have the tools to accurately examine, analyse and evaluate health data, and realise the importance of this work to inform and advance positive health outcomes within societies.

This new certificate program in Population Health Data Analysis meets these needs.
 

Conference Presentations
Canada

What if we were able to support the spread of good ideas and innovations, closing the gap between best and common practice? Imagine if we could turn local improvements into system-wide change! These concepts were at the very heart of the November 2012 Northern, Rural or Remote Panprovincial Roundtable held in Calgary, Alberta.

This roundtable, organized by the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) in partnership with Northern Health (NH), British Columbia and the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC), is the first step toward creating a collaboration for shared learning and healthcare improvement among northern rural or remote health authorities across provinces. The roundtable brought together a core group of similar health service delivery organizations and their research colleagues in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador who are concerned about evidence-informed, effective and sustainable solutions for common healthcare issues.

- See more at: http://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/PublicationsAndResources/ResearchReports/Articl...

Evidence-based practice
Canada

The Problem:

As a champion for patient and family engagement, Tracy Wasylak, Vice-President, Strategic Networks at Alberta Health Services (AHS) and her colleagues from the University of Calgary understood the potential that patient engagement holds for improving health outcomes. She was also aware of the absence of the patient voice within key service delivery groups at Alberta Health Services, in particular the organization’s Bone and Joint Health Strategic Clinical Network (BJHSCN). The research team consisting of Dr. Nancy Marlett, Dr. Deborah Marshall and Dr. Tom Noseworthy sought to remedy this within the BJHSCN. Wasylak notes, “in general, engaged patients are more likely to make active efforts to participate in disease prevention, screening and health promotion activities. Informed, empowered patients more effectively engage in productive interaction with prepared, educated healthcare practice teams.”

Research Resources
Canada

Since 2010, CFHI has provided support to organizations who have deliberately sought to engage patients and their families in the design, delivery and evaluation of healthcare services. Over the course of this endeavor, we have come across a wealth of resources that have facilitated our effort in multiple contexts across the country. This collection of existing resources and accessible tools will provide you with what you need to partner effectively with patients and families to improve the quality of care in your organization. - See more at: http://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/WhatWeDo/Collaborations/PatientEngagement/Patie...

Evidence-based practice
Canada

This series of 19 articles describes processes for ensuring that relevant research is identified, appraised and used to inform decisions about health policies and programs. The tools were written for people responsible for health policy decision-making (e.g., health system managers and policy-makers) and for those who support them.

Research Report
Canada

Although major health inequalities exist in Canada, minimal action has been taken by municipal, provincial/territorial and federal levels of governments to narrow health inequalities through the social determinants of health (SDOH) and public policy.

Income, housing, food insecurity and social exclusion are four major social determinants in generating and reproducing health inequalities over the life course (childhood, adulthood and the elderly stage).
 

Research Report
Canada

Discussions of healthcare reform must acknowledge the following context: on the one hand, public opinion data suggest that Canadians are increasingly concerned about the future viability of public healthcare; on the other hand, Canadians remain highly supportive of universal healthcare in principle, and they remain largely pleased with their own interactions with the system.

There has been a striking increase in public spending on healthcare over the last 10-15 years. Specifically, controlling for inflation, per capita spending on healthcare in Canada was more than 50% higher in 2010 than in 1996.
 

Research Report
Canada

The evolution of the Canadian healthcare system requires a continuous focus on the optimal use and allocation of resources to focus equitably on the health outcomes of Canadians, and to ensure sustainability of the system. Over the medium and longer term, the inevitable slowing of growth in the Canadian economy to match the downturn in workforce growth means that there will be increasing pressures on government revenue and on manpower resources. This means that there must be an increased emphasis on maximizing the value from government programs such as healthcare. Trying to get more health gain for the same or fewer resources, both human and material, is necessarily an important goal. This can involve adapting healthcare processes and skill mixes to improve results. One potential route is to optimize the use of nursing human resources, which many experts consider to be under-utilized in Canada, to enhance the coordination of care and health outcomes.

Research Project
Canada

Key Messages

  • Recent developments within the Canadian health sector highlight a perpetually shifting landscape, coupled with an increasing demand for practical approaches to implementing effective change.
  • The purpose of this project was to identify a suite of evidence-informed approaches to support change in small and large systems that are applicable to a variety of contexts within the Canadian health system.
  • Key issues that leaders and managers face in responding to and initiating change were used to identify evidence-informed approaches.
  • A variety of theories, models, approaches, tools, techniques and instruments that decision makers can effectively use to oversee change exist; these approaches need to be deliberately chosen, with attention to stage of change and context, so as to have maximum utility and impact.
  • More attention to change readiness and change capacity prior to initiating change would contribute to better understanding about what strategies and approaches would help to initiate and support change effectively.
  • More formal learning regarding change in the four key areas of preparing for change, implementing change, spreading change, and sustaining change would be of benefit to decision makers.
  • Developers of university credit and non-credit professional development programs for leaders and managers should be encouraged to make the study of change a prominent feature in their curricula.
  • National and provincial agencies should be encouraged to develop a support platform devoted to leadership development in support of change in the Canadian health system (online access to tools and direct access to expertise).
  • While using approaches to change may be useful, increased attention to conceptualizing the change process would likely lead to more effective implementation and results.
Research Report
Canada

Contrary to popular belief, there is an array of interprofessional collaborative care models in primary care with an essential role for nurses. Many of these models are found in Canada and also internationally.

Five types of interprofessional care models with a substantive role for nurses were found in the published and grey literature:

  • Interprofessional team models
  • Nurse-led models
  • Case management models
  • Patient navigation models
  • Shared care models
Rural Health
Canada

Transformed health systems in northern regions across Canada

Northern Health in British Columbia, the University of Northern British Columbia and the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement are using a pan-provincial healthcare collaboration to identify and spread improvements and transformations to health systems in northern, rural and remote regions across provinces, south of the 60th parallel.

Develop, share and sustain evidence-informed solutions

The specific objectives of the collaboration are to enable Northern Health—as well as other regional health authorities in northern, rural and remote regions—to:

Research, develop, share and sustain evidence-informed solutions

  • Develop local channels to exchange evidence and innovative ideas
  • Bring together health services delivery organizations and academic institutions that share evidence and solutions, and work together to develop and implement improvement plans
  • Identify priorities for further collaborations

As a first step to achieve these goals, the partners are organizing a roundtable for healthcare leaders in northern, rural and remote regions across provinces. The roundtable will make it possible for these leaders to exchange evidence and innovative ideas, identify priority problems and consider how to solve these problems through further collaborations.
 

Knowledge Translation
Canada

Between 2004 and 2007, the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF) funded a
Knowledge Brokering Demonstration Site Program (hereafter, KB program). The program provided
funding support to six healthcare organizations to pilot innovative approaches in the field of
knowledge brokering.

All six healthcare organizations were supported in hiring staff specialized in the promotion of
evidence-based decision-making. The role of the “knowledge brokers” was largely focused on bringing
researchers, managers, and decision-makers together to engage in collaborative problem solving. The
budget for the KB program totaled $1, 400,000 over the three-year period.

Knowledge Translation
Canada

Insight and Action is a monthly digest that shares knowledge about knowledge exchange.

Conference Presentations
Canada

Picking Up the Pace is Canada’s premiere event showcasing how to implement change in primary healthcare by presenting more than 47 innovations selected by an expert committee from across Canada.

Program Evaluation
Canada

Problems arise when circumstances in the world change and conventional wisdom does not.

The present federally funded Canadian healthcare system has been driven principally by insured physicians and hospitals providing acute and episodic care that is a poor match to the changing demographics of persons with chronic disease living longer. The current health system consumes nearly one-half of provincial budgets.

There are solutions.

Teaching
Ontario

To improve, promote and sustain health for caregiver-employees by providing the evidence needed by employers, labour organizations, and society to enact meaningful change in the workplace.

BC

The Change Day campaign started within England’s National Health Service, where pledges included leading a healthier lifestyle, spending a day in a wheelchair to better understand a patient’s challenges, tasting medicine to appreciate why children complain about its taste, and introducing oneself to patients – the phenomenal #hellomynameis campaign.

Even seemingly small pledges can have a positive effect. When combined with all of the other pledges, we can create a tremendous wave of improvement that ripples throughout our organization and system. 

So now the question is … what will you pledge? Join the campaign at www.ChangeDayBC.ca. 1 Day. 5000 Pledges. Unlimited Possibilities.

International

The overall aim of the project was to understand the nature of changing management cultures in the NHS and explore their relationships with changing organisational performance. Specifically we sought to:
- identify and classify the extant cultures in key NHS organisations;
- explore how these cultures evolve and transform over time, both in response to external policies and as a result of internal or cross-boundary drivers;
- analyse the (longitudinal) relationships between changes in culture and performance at both an organisational and a local health economy level.

Research Project
International

Nursing research gained a significant place in our Nation’s science and health care enterprise with the founding of the National Center for Nursing Research (NCNR) on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1986. NCNR began to address the pressing research needs for nursing at that time, and by 1994 it became the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). The year 2006 marked the Institute’s twentieth anniversary at NIH. This booklet presents ten landmark research studies that NINR has supported during its history. These studies helped establish the foundation of NINR’s work and illustrate the varied
expertise of nurse researchers. They span issues that continue to be of great importance to nurses, such as symptom management, preventive health measures, health disparities, and the value of nursing care.

eHealth Resource
Canada

Health care in Canada is currently undergoing significant reforms at regional, provincial,
and national levels. The manner in which scarce health resources will be utilized is foremost
in the minds of health care stakeholders. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) has been
advanced as an innovation that will both reduce health costs and improve patient care.
Numerous studies and reference papers describe the advantages of the EHR; however, little
attention has been directed to assessing the human and fiscal resources necessary to
implement and effectively manage the EHR. As Canadian health settings move from paper to
electronic health records, the role of Health Information Management (HIM®1) professionals
will correspondingly change to meet the demands of an increasingly digital workplace.

In 2009, the Health Informatics and Health Information Management Sector Study (O’Grady
2009) confirmed a significant skills shortage and increasing demand for HIM and health
informatics (HI) professionals by 2014. Study findings suggested that HI and HIM skills
deficits would significantly delay the development and implementation of the EHR in
Canada. EHR implementation is inarguably a laudable policy direction; however, significant
challenges will remain without a corresponding systematic effort to develop the human
resources necessary to support its implementation and maintenance.

Knowledge Translation
Canada

The CHSRF/CIHR Chair on Knowledge Transfer and Innovation began operating in the summer of 2000, and is receiving financial support for ten years as part of the CADRE program (Capacity for Applied and Developmental Research and Evaluation in health services and nursing). The CADRE program is a partnership between the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). The Chair is made up of researchers, graduate and non-graduate students and managers. The objective of the Chair is to further our scientific understanding of knowledge transfer and innovation in health services, to train and support students pursuing master's and Ph.D.'s in this field, and to encourage and facilitate the transfer of knowledge in general.  The Chair:

  • Trains students at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral level.
  • Receives postdoctoral trainees from around the world.
  • Participates in numerous research projects in knowledge transfer and innovation.
  • Distributes a free weekly newsletter on knowledge transfer and innovation in the health services.
  • Is developing a continuously evolving database, entitled KU-UC, which contains documents on knowledge transfer, innovation and health service policies and management. This database can likewise be consulted free of charge.

Advanced Practice Nursing
Canada

Welcome to the APN Data Collection Toolkit

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This site is a compendium of tools used in APN related research.Along with the name and reference of the tool, we've listed:• Psychometric properties•Other APN studies that have used the tool •Author contact information•Where available, a PDF of the toolYou can browse the tools using the Main Menu on the left, or click here.When using instruments in your work, please acknowledge the authors by citing their original work and contact them for permission to use or modify where indicated. Please note: The development of the toolkit remains in progress. More instruments will be added as summaries are completed.

 

Research Resources
Canada

Welcome to the CIHC Library!

New! Two fact sheets describing the CIHC Library to our core user groups.

Please take a look at "CIHC Library for..."

•Health Professionals
•Researchers and Students

The CIHC Library is an electronic library designed to help those searching for information on interprofessional education, collaborative practice and patient-centred care. We accommodate a wide range of interprofessional resources such as curricula, how-to materials, references, research & evaluation instruments, and other communications material. Feel free to browse our collections, or to enter a search term. Please also view the About the Library collection for additional information!

This is a new resource, and we'd love to hear what you think! Please do not hesitate to contact us at library@cihc.ca with your questions, comments or suggestions.

Articles in the CIHC Library are available for download within each record, usually in .pdf format. You will need a .pdf reader, such as Adobe Acrobat, to read these files.
 

Program Evaluation
Canada

OurHealthSystem.ca is an interactive website designed to help Canadians understand how well their health system is performing—province by province, region by region and, for some information, hospital by hospital. It was developed by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).

OurHealthSystem.ca provides information

  • That Canadians want to see
  • That is relevant and easy to understand
  • That is easy to share
Database
Canada

CIHI collects a wide variety of data on different aspects of the health system, including:

  • Patient care in different health settings
  • The health workforce
  • Health spending
  • Health system performance

Click on the data holdings in the table below to learn more about what each database contains. You can also view a summary of all the data available by year (PDF) and the jurisdictional coverage (PDF) for the data holdings.

Researchers, decision-makers and health managers can request specific data from one or more of CIHI’s databases to suit their information needs. Learn how you can access data or make a data request.

Research Project
Canada

Study examines who is returning and why

Soon after their discharge from hospital, more than 180,000 Canadians were readmitted to acute care in 2010, reveals a study from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). In those jurisdictions where detailed emergency department (ED) data was available—Alberta, Ontario and Yukon—nearly 1 in 10 acute care patients returned to the ED within seven days of hospital discharge. The study, All-Cause Readmission to Acute Care and Return to the Emergency Department, included more than 2.1 million hospitalizations across the country. It looked at surgical, medical, pediatric and obstetric patients to better understand who returned to acute care after discharge and for what clinical reason.

“Better understanding of the factors influencing readmission rates is an important step for improving the quality of care for Canadians,” says Jeremy Veillard, Vice President of Research and Analysis at CIHI. “Although readmissions cannot always be avoided, research suggests that in many cases they may be prevented.”

Knowledge Translation
Canada

Knowledge Synthesis for Knowledge Translation
The Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) defines knowledge translation as 'a dynamic and iterative process that includes the synthesis, dissemination, exchange and ethically-sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products and strengthen the healthcare system'. This definition highlights the importance of knowledge synthesis in knowledge translation activities.(1)

CIHR defines synthesis as 'the contextualization and integration of research findings of individual research studies within the larger body of knowledge on the topic. A synthesis must be reproducible and transparent in its methods, using quantitative and/or qualitative methods. It could take the form of a systematic review; follow the methods developed by The Cochrane Collaboration; result from a consensus conference or expert panel and may synthesize qualitative or quantitative results. Realist syntheses, narrative syntheses, meta-analyses, meta-syntheses and practice guidelines are all forms of synthesis.'(1)

CIHR has regular RFAs for knowledge syntheses relevant to the needs of the Canadian health care system. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the rationale for knowledge syntheses, outline current approaches and methods for syntheses, and highlight available resources to aid potential applicants
 

Program Evaluation
Canada

Citizen engagement, sometimes referred to as public involvement or participation, and societal or community engagement, is about meaningful involvement of individual citizens in policy or program development. It generally includes all of the activities organizations take to involve the communities they serve in directing policies and priorities or in their governance. It also frequently refers to processes where members of the general public, as opposed to representatives of stakeholder groups, are the main foci of the engagement, who are meaningfully involved in two-way interactions consisting of dialogue and deliberation with the health care organization or group. Ultimately citizen engagement is about sharing decision making power and responsibility for decisions.

Research Resources
Canada

The CIHR Institute of Health Services and Policy Research (IHSPR) has set out an ambitious direction for the next five years. We aim to build the scientific leadership for learning health systems in Canada, tap into the transformative potential of eHealth for Canadian healthcare, find a better system to support aging in the community, and provide research intelligence on the question of how to finance and fund the health system of the future.

Research Resources
Canada

CIHR believes that greater access to research publications and data will promote the ability of researchers in Canada and abroad to use and build on the knowledge needed to address significant health challenges. Open access enables authors to reach a much broader audience, which has the potential to increase the impact of their research. Only when research findings are widely available, enabling open scrutiny, will this evidence be translated into policies, technologies, health-related standards and practices, and new avenues of research that will benefit the health of Canadians and others. From a Knowledge Translation perspective, this policy will support our desire to expedite awareness of and facilitate the use of research findings by policy makers, health care administrators, clinicians, and the public, by greatly increasing ease of access to research.

Grant-writing
Canada

This guidebook is intended for all researchers (new and experienced) who write grant applications in any area of health research, including basic biomedical research, clinical research, the social sciences and the humanities.

This guidebook provides tips about:

  • applying for a grant as a Principal Investigator (PI)
  • writing papers
  • building and managing your research team and laboratory
  • managing your time

Knowledge Translation
Canada

At CIHR, knowledge translation (KT) is defined as a dynamic and iterative process that includes synthesis, dissemination, exchange and ethically-sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products and strengthen the health care system. This page provides links to CIHR KTE resources.

Knowledge Translation
Canada

Webinar Objective:

To develop skills needed by researchers to effectively convey their research to the media and general public using social media platforms.

Research Resources
Canada

Design of the New Open Suite of Programs and Peer Review Process

Designing for the Future: The New Open Suite of Programs and Peer Review Process

  • Town Hall Presentation
  • Foundation Scheme fact sheet
  • Project Scheme fact sheet
  • Transition fact sheet
  • Feedback Analysis Report

What CIHR Heard: Analysis of Feedback on the Design Discussion Document

  • Annex I
  • Annex II
  • Design Discussion Document
  • CIHR Design Discussion Document: Proposed Changes to CIHR's Open Suite of Programs and Enhancements to the Peer Review Process

Town Hall Presentation
 

Research Unit
Quebec

Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a practice that aims to evaluate the potential impacts of a policy, program or project on population health so as to minimize the negative and maximize the positive effects.

The founding documents of HIA identify citizen participation as one of the cornerstones of HIA. In fact, some maintain that an HIA remains incomplete without the effective and concrete participation of the community (Dannenberg, Bhatia et al., 2006, p.266).

The aim of this report is to introduce public health actors to the issues surrounding citizen participation in HIA. We will first examine the principal arguments in favour of citizen participation. We will then put these arguments into perspective, by also addressing some of the obstacles and risks associated with citizen participation in HIA.
 

Evidence-based practice
International

The CLEAR service is delivered by a team of information professionals based at NHS Quality Improvement Scotland. The service uses the expertise of the team to identify and signpost best quality evidence in response to questions arising from patient care and related to delivery of care from clinicians.

Evidence-based practice
International

Evidence-based clinical decision support tools and calculators for medical professionals

Modern medicine is becoming increasingly complex and specialized. While clinical decision support systems, such as this website, cannot replace a clinician, they can be valuable tools to augment the quality of care. ClinCalc.com was specifically designed for the clinician seeking to utilize and understand the most recent evidence-based medicine to improve patient care.

Advanced Practice Nursing
Canada

Increasingly, there is a growing demand for advanced practice nursing (APN) in Canada and around the world. As clinical experts, leaders and change agents, APNs are recognized as an important human resource strategy for improving access to high-quality, cost-effective and sustainable models of healthcare.

This special report was commissioned by CFHI to develop a better understanding of the roles of APNs, the contexts in which they are currently being used, and the health system factors that influence the effective integration of advanced practice nursing in the Canadian healthcare system. Three types of APNs were the focus of this report: clinical nurse specialists (CNSs), primary healthcare nurse practitioners (PHCNPs), and acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs).

Patient Safety
International

When treating patients, doctors and other healthcare providers often are faced with difficult decisions and considerable uncertainty. They rely on the scientific literature, in addition to their knowledge, experience, and patient preferences, to inform their decisions. Clinical practice guidelines are statements that include recommendations intended to optimize patient care. They are informed by a systematic review of evidence and an assessment of the benefits and harms of alternative care options.

Conference Presentations
Canada

Throughout the winter and spring of 2013, the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) conducted wide-ranging consultations to gather input on Canadians’ views on the social determinants of health. Public town hall meetings were held in Winnipeg, Hamilton, Charlottetown, Calgary, Montréal
and St. John’s and were accompanied by an online consultation at http://healthcaretransformation.ca/.

The process was framed around four questions aimed at determining what factors beyond the health care system influence health, what initiatives offset the negative impact of these determinants, what governments and health care providers should be doing to address these social determinants, and how equal access for all to the health care system can be achieved.  In every phase of the consultation, four main social determinants of health were identified by participants:

  • income
  • housing
  • nutrition and food security
  • early childhood development 
Advanced Practice Nursing
Canada

CNA is proud to partner with Immunize Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) in support of the 2013-2014 influenza immunization campaign. Together, we will provide tools and resources to keep you informed throughout the coming flu season.

Advanced Practice Nursing
Canada

With advanced nursing degrees and extra training and experience, nurse practitioners are helping Canadians get more access to quality health care. In community clinics, health-care centres, doctors’ offices, nursing homes and emergency departments, nurse practitioners diagnose and manage illnesses like diabetes, order and interpret tests, write prescriptions and a whole lot more.

Association
Canada

A Nursing Call to Action, a report from the CNA’s National Expert Commission, suggests a fundamental shift in how health and health care is funded, managed and delivered in Canada.

Journal
Canada

Nursing 2.0

Many of our nursing colleagues are networking, sharing information and developing themselves
professionally by using social media. How are they doing it without risking their professional and personal reputations? 

International

This database offers free access to the abstracts and, where available, the plain language summaries of all Cochrane systematic reviews. Links to the full-text versions are available on each page.

The Cochrane Collaboration prepares Cochrane Reviews and aims to update them regularly with the latest scientific evidence. Members of the organisation (mostly volunteers) work together to provide evidence to help people make decisions about health care. Some people read the healthcare literature to find reports of randomised controlled trials; others find such reports by searching electronic databases; others prepare and update Cochrane Reviews based on the evidence found in these trials; others work to improve the methods used in Cochrane Reviews; others provide a vitally important consumer perspective; and others support the people doing these tasks. The Cochrane Collaboration website provides information on a variety of ways of registering interest or becoming directly involved.

International

Editing documents using centralised online cloud storage is an increasingly popular workflow adjustment, making documents more easily accessible and more transparently adaptable. There is great potential for academics and researchers to explore the variety of free services available. Kim Mann shares her experience here of using Google Drive to write a conference panel summary with long-distance colleagues. She finds the technology to be particularly conducive to the brainstorming stages as well as to the improvement of the finished output.

Ontario

A Journey between Urban and Remote Practice Settings

A slideshow of a presentation at the National Aboriginal Health Organization's November 2009 conference.

Canada

University Health Network (UHN) became a demonstration site to test a health human resource planning model to foster inter-organizational collaboration, knowledge transfer and exchange of nurses between an urban academic health science centre and a remote region in northern Ontario. Funding support was provided by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The partnership between UHN, Weeneebayko Health Ahtuskaywin (WHA) and James Bay General Hospital (JBGH) addressed retention, recruitment, professional practice development, planning and succession planning objectives. The primary goal of this partnership was to supply the staffing needs of WHA/JBGH with UHN nurses at a decreased cost for four- to six-week placement periods. This resulted in a marked decrease in agency use by approximately 40% in the WHA site during the months UHN nurses were practicing in the north, with an overall agency cost savings of $165,000 reported in the pilot year.

Program Evaluation
International

Welcome to the Collaborative Center for Integrative Reviews and Evidence Summaries (CCIRES). CCIRES provides linkage across the academic-to-service and research-to-practice divides through an innovative nursing collaborative partnership. This academic-service partnership seeks to:

  • Create a collaborative center to advance nursing practice through the examination of evidence, including research findings
  • Establish a web-based repository of integrative reviews, evidence summaries, and literature review, as well as the tools and resources needed by professional nurses to conduct various reviews of the evidence
  • Answer clinical questions and positively impact patient outcomes
  • Enlighten current evidence review processes within a collaborative digital setting
  • Demystify the evidence review process
  • Advance the state of the art and science of integrative reviews and evidence summaries
Program Evaluation
International

From “Evidence to Action.” It sounds like a prime-time cop drama; solving mysteries with a few good shootouts and chases in between collecting clues and interpreting evidence to nail down an answer and a bad guy.

Well, it’s not quite as exciting as television — and there are hopefully no bullets flying or a real bad guy — but it is about collecting evidence, interpreting facts and putting that knowledge together to solve a problem. It is the 2012 International Council of Nurses (ICN) International Nurses Day (IND) kit. And, it is the project the ICN thinks nurses around the globe should be working on for the next year.
 

Program Evaluation
Alberta

Quality Improvement (QI) and evaluation projects have become increasingly important, multiplying in number and growing in complexity. Although ethics oversight principals and processes are well established for research projects, a gap exists for non-research projects. Many QI and evaluation projects have ethical implications, but ethics screening and review processes are often limited and inconsistently applied. This uncertainty and inconsistency often leads to misunderstandings about how and when ethical implications should be addressed in QI and evaluation projects. Reviewing the following common misunderstandings and our responses to them should help clarify these issues for you and reinforce that sound practice requires integrating ethical considerations into your QI and evaluation projects to ensure that people are protected and respected

Evidence-based practice
International

The information in this report is intended to help health care decisionmakers—patients and clinicians, health system leaders, and policymakers, among others—make well-informed decisions and thereby improve the quality of health care services. This report is not intended to be a substitute for the application of clinical judgment. Anyone who makes decisions concerning the provision of clinical care should consider this report in the same way as any medical reference and in conjunction with all other pertinent information, i.e., in the context of available resources and circumstances presented by individual patients.  

BC

Community Solutions Planning and Evaluation
Consulting for Nonprofit and Public Sector Organizations
The website link provides a list of services provided and of past clients and some of their testimonials.

Care delivery innovation
International

This resource center provides strategies and support for organizations that are planning, implementing, or enhancing a community-based palliative care (CBPC) program.

While specialist palliative care is available in many acute care hospitals, people with serious illness and their families can also benefit greatly from community-based palliative care (CBPC), an emerging field that is starting to take root in communities across California.

This resource center provides strategies and support for organizations that are planning, implementing, or enhancing an outpatient CBPC program.

Care delivery innovation
BC

Cattonline.com currently provides two free online concussion toolkits: the Concussion Clinical Toolkit for Medical Professionals and the Concussion Awareness Training Toolkit for Parents, Players, and Coaches.

Both websites provide up-to-date education, tools and resources to help prevent, recognize, treat and manage concussions as well as support decreasing the impact of concussion when they do occur.

These resources are updated on a monthly basis and will provide the latest evidence on how to deal with concussions.

Conference Presentations
International

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

It is my pleasure to present the Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Nursing Informatics (NI2012) sponsored by the IMIA-NI SIG. As you now know, the NI series of conferences is the leading gathering in the world for nurses, midwives, and others interested in the use of health information and communication technology to improve global health. This event is held every three years in a different part of the world. Our time spent in Montreal at NI 2012 provides tremendous opportunity for discussion and meaningful interaction amongst the most talented professionals in the field of nursing and nursing informatics.

Our theme, Advancing Global Health through Informatics, reflects the team-centered and interdisciplinary approach that is required to truly transform the health of our nations, our communities, and our patients. This Congress is truly global in scope. With contributions from 38 different countries and a tremendous response to our call for presentations, we have facilitated significant knowledge transfer from experts working in clinics, hospitals, universities and institutions large and small, local and regional, national and global.

International

Conflict is an inevitable part of your professional life. This multi-part series will explore the roots of conflict and suggest methods for effectively managing difficult situations.

Part 1: Nursing Strategies: Understanding the Sources and Costs of Conflict

Part 2: Nursing Strategies: Common Tactics for Managing Conflict

Part 3: Nursing Strategies: Guidelines for Painless Conflict Resolution

Part 4: Nursing Strategies: Countering Conflict with Positive Communication

 

Conference Presentations
International

Helping Hand:  10 innovative nurses have been awarded with our support in the continuance and further development of their projects. Discover their ideas and see why they were chosen for the Helping Hand award

Nurses in the Limelight:  10 nurses have won the limelight award for their creativity. Watch soon their stories through a professionally produced video, showcasing the motivation behind their award winning ideas.

Research Project
International

The mission of the EI Consortium is to advance research and practice of emotional and social intelligence in organizations through the generation and exchange of knowledge. The Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations is currently made up of 8 core members and 56 additional members who are individuals with a strong record of accomplishment as applied researchers in the field. There also are six organizational and corporate members. The Consortium was founded in the spring of 1996 with the support of the Fetzer Institute. Its initial mandate was to study all that is known about emotional intelligence in the workplace.

Knowledge Translation
Quebec

This document outlines the process for constructing a logic model as proposed in the NCCHPP's method for synthesizing knowledge about public policies. It also shows the use of this type of logic model in applications other than knowledge synthesis, as a tool that public health actors can use to analyze public policies. 

Professional Development
International

Leadership

These educational courses help nurses make pivotal changes in the nursing profession – one leader at a time. From human resource issues to using evidence to define standards of practice, these courses cover the entire nursing management spectrum.

Professional Development
International

Professional Development

Whether you are a nurse manager, clinician, researcher, or a returning nurse, these courses will help you take your career to the next level.

Professional Development
International

Workplace Issues

From disaster preparedness to implementing evidence-based nursing research into everyday practice, these courses will give nurses the tools they need to be prepared when workplace issues arise.

Evidence-based practice
Canada

The explicit inclusion of determinants of health in public health competency statements ensures that action on the determinants is a visible and concrete part of public health practice. This assessment explores how and to what extent the determinants of health are reflected in Core Competencies for Public Health in Canada: Release 1.0, made available by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) in 2007. The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health reviewed the PHAC document and compared it with four sets of competencies for public health from the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia.

Evidence-based practice
BC

The Core Public Health Functions Research Initiative (CPHFRI) is a program of research focused on public health systems renewal in British Columbia (BC). This research involves a team of interdisciplinary academic researchers, and national, provincial and local public health knowledge users and practitioners. The overall goal of CPHFRI (“see-free”) is to develop a research program, along with training opportunities, that studies the impact and outcomes of the Core Public Health Functions Framework in BC. Learn about our research projects. We also hope to increase the capacity of knowledge users to use evidence to improve public health policy and practice that will ultimately improve the health of the population.

Advanced Practice Nursing
International

In a review of studies comparing the cost of primary care when delivered by NPs and physician assistants (PAs) to care provided by MDs, researchers found that, in studies where NPs and PAs assumed care roles previously occupied by MDs, “substitution of visits to physicians by visits to NPs and PAs achieved savings in the first year of implementation” (Naylor and Kurtzman 2010).

A study of 26 capitated care practices of a group model managed care organization found that total labor costs were lowest in practices where NPs and PAs were used to a greater extent (Roblin et al., 2005).
A study comparing NP versus MD management of post-revascularization hypercholesterolemia found that patients managed by NPs are more likely to comply with the prescription regimen and achieve their health goals at a lower cost (Paez and Allen, 2006).

Evidence-based practice
International

AS NURSES, most of us have experienced one of our patients "coding." No matter what the circumstances, you felt that surge of adrenaline that enables you to rapidly recognize an unresponsive, apneic patient, activate the resuscitation team, and provide basic life support until the team arrives. This is what nurses do-we save lives and so much more.

But maybe you've also had this experience: After an unsuccessful resuscitation attempt, someone says, "He was 90 years old with metastatic cancer. What were we thinking?" It leaves us with the uneasy feeling that something should be different.

End-of-life decision making is always difficult and should be well thought out before a crisis. The decision to forgo CPR can be one of the hardest decisions a patient or family member has to make.

Writing to me about end-of-life concerns, one of you asked for "good, solid statistics about CPR in older adults" and requested some resources for family members. Evidence-based nursing is built upon examining the research, so I searched for pertinent studies that provided those "good solid statistics." Here's what I found.

International

Wise Mapping is the web mind mapping tool that leverages the power of Mind Maps mixing new technologies like HTML 5.0 and SVG

A mind map is a diagram used to represent words, ideas, tasks or other items linked to and arranged radially around a central key word or idea. It is used to generate, visualize, structure and classify ideas, and as an aid in study, organization, problem solving, and decision making.

It is an image-centered diagram that represents semantic or other connections between portions of information. By presenting these connections in a radial, non-linear graphical manner, it encourages a brainstorming approach to any given organizational task, eliminating the hurdle of initially establishing an intrinsically appropriate or relevant conceptual framework to work within.

A mind map is similar to a semantic network or cognitive map but there are no formal restrictions on the kinds of links used.

The elements are arranged intuitively according to the importance of the concepts and they are organized into groupings, branches, or areas. The uniform graphic formulation of the semantic structure of information on the method of gathering knowledge, may aid recall of existing memories.

Care delivery innovation
International

Of all of the changes envisioned as part of the transformation to improved and more patient-centered primary care, perhaps none is more promising and more challenging than the transition to team-based delivery of care.

Team-based care is defined by the National Academy of Medicine (formerly known as the Institute of Medicine) as "...the provision of health services to individuals, families, and/or their communities by at least two health providers who work collaboratively with patients and their caregivers—to the extent preferred by each patient - to accomplish shared goals within and across settings to achieve coordinated, high-quality care."1-3

Well-implemented team-based care has the potential to improve the comprehensiveness, coordination, efficiency, effectiveness, and value of care, as well as the satisfaction of patients and providers.2,4-8 To achieve this potential, the transition to team-based primary care requires, for most practices, profound changes in the culture and organization of care, in the nature of interactions among colleagues and with patients, in education and training, and in the ways in which primary care personnel and patients understand their roles and responsibilities.

Education Module
BC

Self directed learning module produced by the College of Registered Nurses of BC exploring clinical decision making in nursing practice.

Professional Development
Canada

The Cultural Competence and Cultural Safety in Health Services program is designed to provide training to health service professionals who work in aboriginal settings and with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. By becoming familiar with these concepts, health professionals can add a cultural competence component to their foundations of skills.

First Nations
Canada

First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations in Canada suffer from a variety of health disparities, including higher rates of infant mortality, higher rates of diabetes and other chronic diseases, greater prevalence of tuberculosis and other communicable diseases, as well as a shorter life expectancy compared to non-Aboriginali Canadians.  Public health experts, community health workers and health care providers are trying to reduce Aboriginal health disparities through research, programs and services.  As part of this effort, a group of researchers from Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United Statesii have proposed the development of a set of core competencies for Aboriginal public health. Together, they have established a collaboration called CIPHER: Competencies for Indigenous Public Health, Evaluation and Research. 

BC

Culture is the way we think, our values, our attitudes, our perceptions, and our beliefs. It’s also about
how we act, our habits and our typical behaviours.  It’s not about one person. Culture is about our
shared beliefs, what we expect of each other, what’s considered normal, and our shared patterns
of behaviour that determine how our organization functions. It’s “the way we do things around here.” 

Ontario

Project: Partnering with Employers: Increasing Internationally Educated Nurse (IEN) Employment in Health Care Organizations

Ontario

Project: Partnering with Employers: Increasing Internationally Educated Nurse (IEN) Employment in Health care Organizations

 

Research Report
Canada

This environmental scan is an evergreen document. It synthesizes major health policy
related events, data, and other information that were mostly released in 2012. In
keeping with previous editions, this reference document provides a national overview
of key indicators and trends in the following four domains:

  • Socio-demographic environment,
  • Political environment,
  • Economic environment,
  • Healthcare system environment: Access, quality, and human resources for health. 
Knowledge Translation
International

Creating spaces for discussion between people from a variety of organisations and backgrounds is not an easy task. It requires time, resources and commitment. It also calls for participants to be flexible and honest about their relationships, as well as being open to experiencing alternative ways of relating to each other. This diversity can breed innovation, energy, consensus and understanding of a broader context, but it can also lead to inaction and frustration.

These cards have been developed to give you practical help in facilitating diverse groups. This is not a ‘how to’ guide, but a tool to help you explore new approaches and develop your own.

Knowledge Translation
Ontario

We cannot pick up a magazine or surf the Internet without facing reminders of the challenges to health care and the “sorry state” of health systems. 1 All health care systems are faced with the challenges of improving quality of care and reducing the risk of adverse events. 2 Globally, health systems fail to use evidence optimally. The result is inefficiency and a reduction in both quantity and quality of life. 3,4 For example, McGlynn and colleagues 5 found that adults in the United States received less than 55% of recommended care. Providing evidence from clinical research (e.g., through publication in journals) is necessary but not enough for the provision of optimal care. Recognition of this issue has created interest in knowledge translation, also known as KT, which we define as the methods for closing the gaps from knowledge to practice. In this series of articles, we will provide a framework for implementing knowledge for clinicians, managers and policy-makers.

Research Report
International

The purpose of this research paper is to examine the benefits and challenges of engaging stakeholders in the process of developing and performing systematic reviews, drawing upon findings from the literature and Key Informant (KI) interviews with program leaders, systematic reviewers and stakeholders from within the EPC program and other international evidence-based programs

Knowledge Translation
Canada

If we conceptualize knowledge translation (KT) as an ever-turning cycle of policy-informed research leading to evidence-informed policy, then priority setting is where this cycle often begins to move. A singular KT tool in identifying policy needs and research options, deliberative priority setting selects the right people to brainstorm on the right issues to determine what a society's, a system's, or an institution's priorities are. Exactly how we determine the "right people," select the "right issues," and arrive at a set of fair and inclusive priorities is the subject of this Module.

International

We have witnessed the impact of organisational culture on quality of care, safety, and organisational effectiveness in the NHS. Prominent failures such as Mid Staffordshire highlighted that a good organisational culture is a necessary condition for organisational strategy to succeed, and leadership is the preeminent influence factor for organisational culture.

Leadership culture must be understood as the product of collective actions of formal and informal leaders acting together for organisational success.  It is not simply the number or quality of individual leaders that determine organisational performance, but the ability of formal and informal leaders to pull together in support of the organisation’s goals.

Research Report
Canada

A palliative approach pertains to the integration of principles of palliative care in contexts of care for people with chronic life-limiting illnesses and their families. As part of a program of research addressing how and in which contexts a palliative approach can better meet the needs of people with chronic life-limiting conditions and their family members, the iPANEL team (Initiative for a Palliative Approach in Nursing: Evidence and Leadership – www.ipanel.ca) is pursuing several broadly oriented research questions relevant to a palliative approach. A core focus involves an overarching knowledge synthesis regarding health care systems policy, education, and practice initiatives for a palliative approach. This poster reports on one aspect of the knowledge synthesis, focusing specifically on delineating the key characteristics of a palliative approach that are found in the empiric literature in order to establish conceptual clarity.

Advanced Practice Nursing
Ontario

This toolkit was developed and evaluated within a collaborative research study involving Cancer Care Ontario, McMaster University, Laurentian University and regional cancer centres in Sudbury and Hamilton.

The toolkit uses the PEPPA Framework, a participatory, evidence-informed patient-focused process for promoting the effective introduction and evaluation of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles.

Research Report
International

The consolidation of health care systems to develop centers of clinical excellence has led to an increased reliance on medical transport to move patients requiring time-sensitive interventions and specialized treatments. There is a paucity of outcomes data, specifically comparative effectiveness research, related to the efficacy of different transport services and the overall morbidity and mortality of patients that undergo medical transfer. The rapid development of electronic medical record (EMR) use has also occurred with transport charting. However, limited studies have incorporated transport chart data in outcomes analyses. We have begun development of a fully integrated medical transport record, combining transport and hospitals EMRs, to support research efforts and develop clinical decision support tools for transported patients. In this paper, we describe the elements necessary to develop a fully integrated medical transport EMR to support the conduct of comparative effectiveness research, outline the current limitations and challenges, and provide insight into the future direction in developing clinical decision support tools for patients requiring transport.

Canada

The term "vulnerability" is used increasingly in occupational health and safety (OHS) in Ontario. Although certain groups in the labour market (e.g. younger workers, temporary workers or immigrants) are often labelled as “vulnerable workers,” there is very little discussion about what the broader workplace and occupational factors are that lead to increased risk of injury among these groups, and whether these risk factors are similar across the groups. In this plenary, Dr. Peter Smith, a scientist at the Institute for Work & Health, provides an overview of the conceptual framework of OHS vulnerability. He also shares preliminary findings from a survey capturing different dimensions of OHS vulnerability across a sample of workers in Ontario and British Columbia.

Ontario

The Workplace Health Research Laboratory (WHRL) at Brock University gathers, analyzes, reports and interprets the information that HR professionals and senior management need to build productive and engaged workforces.

This is a presentation to the 2008 Ontario University Registrar's Association Annual Conference.

Conference Presentations
BC

Eighteen years ago, Dr. Arvind Singhal's son, Anshuman, was born premature at 29 weeks. He weighed 678 grams, less than one and a half pounds. The first two years of Anshuman’s life were spent on life support at the Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, as he underwent multiple complex surgeries. That time in the hospital was a blur for Singhal and his wife, Anuja, but the practices of two medical professionals will always remain clear in Singhal’s mind, and close to his heart and soul.

“Pre-op with a preemie baby,” Singhal takes a deep breath at the memory. “Stressful.”

Why? Because babies are typically pinned down while they’re poked, he says. Wiggling. Screaming. It’s not easy to find a vein on such a tiny arm.

“They fight it with every ounce of strength in their body and with every ounce of oxygen that they can muster,” says Singhal, a prominent U.S.-based scholar and associate faculty member at Royal Roads University.

Knowledge Translation
Canada

DialoguePH is a network for public health professionals across Canada. The network is hosted by NCCMT and supports the sharing of methods, tools and experiences related to moving research evidence into practice. Current network initiatives include discussion forums, weekly messages, a member directory, professional development opportunities and polls.

eHealth Resource
International

Digital Collections is the National Library of Medicine's free online archive of biomedical books and videos. All the content in Digital Collections is in the public domain and freely available worldwide. Digital Collections provides unique access to NLM's rich, historical resources.

Digital Collections uses a suite of open source and NLM-created software. For more information on the development and technical description of Digital Collections, see the NLM Digital Repository Project information page.
 

Healthcare interventions
Canada

After consultation with public health practitioners, including provincial and territorial chief medical officers of health and staff of the Public Health Agency of Canada, it was decided that a rapid review of the current enterovirus outbreak would be useful for Canadian public health practitioners.

To prepare this debrief, information has been gathered from a number of sources, including the Public Health Agency of Canada, provincial health organizations, USA Centers for Disease Prevention and Control and other American public health organizations, MMWR, ProMED, media reports, and previous literature (although not a formal literature review).

Because there appear to have been relatively few observations and analyses of cases and outbreaks specifically associated with EV-D68, much of the information in this Disease Debrief is based on incomplete information from current and previous reports of outbreaks or has been extrapolated from what has been known about similar viruses. NCCID intends to update this document as required; any questions or suggestions would be most appreciated.

Evidence-based practice
International

HIAs provide decision-makers an opportunity to minimize health risks and enhance health benefits, allowing for informed decisions related to agriculture, transportation, housing, education, land use, and energy.

Health impact assessments (HIAs) are evidence-based analyses that predict health benefits and risks of proposed laws, regulations, programs, and projects.

Knowledge Translation
BC

C2E2 annual lecture offers opportunity to learn about successful knowledge translation in critical care.
Canada’s doctors face a challenging task: help shift healthcare and health research to being more patient-oriented and do so with high levels of efficiency that safeguard the current healthcare system in which resources are already stretched. Effective knowledge translation (KT) – turning research knowledge and innovation into new strategies, action, devices, etc., that improve patient care and healthcare systems – provides the evidence needed by healthcare professionals and policy-makers to determine how to meet the challenge of delivering the best care in a cost-effective manner.

Evidence-based practice
Canada

Canadian Health Policy in the News is a compendium of the commentaries (or OpEds) we have published in major newspapers across the country since the birth of EvidenceNetwork.ca in April 2011 up to October 2012. It is a timely, balanced and non-partisan snapshot of what’s new and controversial concerning our healthcare system and related social programs that affect health and well-being in our country – with evidence at the forefront.

Care delivery innovation
Canada

Jennifer Stinson was a nurse at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto who enjoyed brainstorming new ideas for improving care, especially for the kids with cancer she treats. But even as she gained status by getting her PhD and becoming a clinician scientist, she came up against persistent bureaucratic and organizational barriers to innovation.

International

The authority on behaviour & social science research

Inside you will find 20 interactive chapters with authoritative answers to methodological questions on behavioral and social science research. With contributions from a team of international experts, this anthology provides the latest information on addressing emerging challenges in public health.

Mental Health
BC

Families are often the central care providers for the majority of young people experiencing a first episode of psychosis. Psychosis brings tremendous stress to the entire family and they usually experience an adjustment period and their own recovery process. Families, regardless of whether the young person lives at home or somewhere else, play an extremely important role in recovery from psychosis. Strong family support is one of the most important contributors to a successful recovery. This section provides some practical ideas about how to support your family member.

Evidence-based practice
Manitoba

Making Evidence Matter in Canadian Health Policy is a compendium of OpEds published in the media in 2012-2013 by some of Canada’s leading experts in the field, offering a snapshot of the evidence on the issues of the day. It is the second in a series of eBooks produced by EvidenceNetwork.ca, the first being Canadian Health Policy in the News, which achieved 13,000 reads in the first year of release. - See more at: http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/17545#sthash.Yjq4Q...

Knowledge Translation
International
  • Discover new tools
  • See what other educators use
  • Rate and review your favorite tools

It's free!

Patient Safety
Canada

This report focuses on health authority quality and safety leaders; those responsible for leading and supporting improvement initiatives. It provides a snapshot of their skills, abilities and professional development needs and explores some of the ways these needs are being met in other jurisdictions. Based on these findings, some options are presented for the BCPSQC to consider to support the health authorities as they build capacity for patient safety and quality improvement.

Education Module
International

Today I am sharing with you a video tutorial created by a guy who is Google Apps for Education Certified Trainer and in which he expalains in a step by step process how you can use Google Forms to create self-grading assessment. The video is not long it is just a little over 7 minutes but I really loved it and I am pretty sure you will as well.

Patient Safety
Canada

Welcome! The Effective Governance for Quality and Patient Safety Toolkit is intended to be a resource for healthcare board members and senior leaders, and leverages the commissioned research led by Dr. G. Ross Baker (2010), “Effective Governance for Quality and Patient Safety in Canadian Healthcare Organizations”, which identified a number of key elements or ‘drivers’ that enable boards to fulfill their responsibilities for quality and patient safety.

Knowledge Translation
International

Research evidence has the potential to inform policy and practice decisions to ensure better outcomes for children, young people and communities - yet often the impact of research is not maximised. This web article aims to provide brief, to the point information on how to increase the likelihood of your research making a difference.

What is knowledge exchange?
First things first – what do we actually mean by knowledge exchange? There is growing evidence that the successful uptake of research knowledge requires more than one way communication. Pushing research messages from research producers to the users of research is not enough - but genuine interaction is needed amongst researchers, policy makers and other stakeholders. This interaction is known as Knowledge Exchange. (Lavis et al. 2003)

Knowledge Translation
International

The goal of our study is to investigate productivity change in the hospital sector as well as its key
components: efficiency change and technological change. To study these questions we use recent
advances in productivity analysis—non-parametric (kernel-based) statistical analysis of distributions
of productivity scores and their components obtained from the Malmquist Productivity index (MPI)
through application of the data envelopment analysis (DEA) estimator.

eHealth Online Course
Canada

This tool has been designed to help you learn about eHealth and how it affects your daily practice as a nurse.

It will also provide you with the necessary background information to appreciate how eHealth can enhance your nursing practice and client care, by covering such subjects as:

  • how eHealth can support nursing roles, client care, and client empowerment,
  • the historical development of eHealth, and
  • the linkages between nursing, quality care, and eHealth
eHealth Resources
BC

The following lists of free resources has been taken from library subject guides and resource lists. e-HLbc has not evaluated any of the following resources.

Please note that several of the listed resources are known to collect and report what their users have been searching. Please consult the privacy policy of any resource before downloading it to your mobile device.

Descriptions of each resource are taken directly from the home page or "about" page of the resource.

eHealth Resources
BC

The following lists of free resources has been taken from library subject guides and resource lists. e-HLbc has not evaluated any of the following resources.

Please note that several of the listed resources are known to collect and report what their users have been searching. Please consult the privacy policy of any resource before downloading it to your mobile device.

Descriptions of each resource are taken directly from the home page or "about" page of the resource.

Education Module
International

This module introduces you to Lean in healthcare. You will find out about Lean thinking and principles, look at some examples of how these are being applied in practice, and have an opportunity to learn about Lean tools and techniques.

What will I learn?

By the end of this module you should be able to identify the concept and purpose of Lean, describe its key principles and how these are being applied in healthcare, and identify key Lean tools and how they might be applied.

To view these learning objectives at any time during the module, select the button at the bottom of the screen that says 'Objectives'.

Research Resources
BC

The Electronic Health Library of BC provides the academic and health care community of British Columbia with easy access to online health library resources. The purpose of the e-HLbc is to support and improve practice, education, and research in the health sciences.

Member organizations include all publicly funded BC post-secondary institutions providing health education, the BC Ministry of Advanced Education, the BC Ministry of Health, the BC Ministry of Children and Family Development, all BC Health Authorities, and the BC College of Physicians and Surgeons.

First Nations
Canada

It is well documented that many underlying factors negatively affect the health of Aboriginal people in Canada, including poverty and the intergenerational effects of colonization and residential schools.
But one barrier to good health lies squarely in the lap of the health care system itself.  Many Aboriginal people don’t trust—and therefore don’t use—mainstream health care services because they don’t feel safe from stereotyping and racism, and because the Western approach to health care can feel
alienating and intimidating.

First Nations
Ontario

Most health care providers and policy-makers know there are significant health disparities between First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people and non-Indigenous Canadians. What they don’t know is that the attitudes and behaviour of health care providers may unwittingly contribute to this situation.

Indigenous people often feel uncomfortable, fearful, or powerless when they attempt to use the health care system because they don’t feel safe from stereotyping and racism, and because the culture of mainstream health care feels alienating and intimidating. As a result, many Indigenous people avoid going for care, even when they are ill. And if they don’t feel safe visiting health care providers, they also miss the benefits of preventive care and early detection of disease. These are some of the reasons that Indigenous people are more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage of disease than non-Indigenous people, when treatment is more difficult or no longer possible. 

Research Report
Ontario

The Nursing Graduate Guarantee (NGG) was launched in 2007 to encourage full-time (FT) employment for registered nurse (RN) and registered practical nurse (RPN) graduates in Ontario. This provincial government initiative was created in response to an increasing trend towards casualization of the nursing workforce, particularly new graduate nurses (NGNs). The NGG funds six months of supernumerary FT employment for NGNs.

In 2012, there were 6648 nursing graduates (3383 RNs and 3265 RPNs); 2249 participated in the NGG (1813 RNs and 436 RPNs). Additionally, 214 employers participated. Hospitals hired the majority of new graduates (85%), followed by long-term care facilities (10%) and community organizations (5%). During the past six years, 14,395 NGNs participated in the NGG. An average of 200 healthcare employers per year also participated.
 

eHealth Resource
International

Health care costs are growing at an unsustainable rate throughout much of the world. In response, many governments are taking steps to prod the health care industry to aggressively expand its use of IT. The potential long-term benefits to all parties, measured in cost savings and improved medical outcomes, will be vast. But the near- to intermediate-term disruption to the industry will be significant, translating into both costs and opportunities for industry players and the entire health-care ecosystem.

BC

A key proposition set out in Setting Priorities for the B.C. Health System and a subsequent document on B.C. Health System Strategy Implementation: A Collaborative and Focused Approach is that the current utilization of hospitals is neither sustainable nor the best delivery system for meeting the needs of several key populations. The documents argue the need to radically rethink and reposition hospital care by providing a more effective range of services in the community. A suite of strategic policy papers – primary and community care, surgical services, and rural health services - produced by the Ministry of Health are intended to address this shift in service delivery. This will have a significant impact on health human resources management.

The province currently lacks a coherent, comprehensive and sustained health human resource strategy.  The Health Human Resource Strategy advanced here is a key enabling strategy identified to support the priorities of the health system and to produce an engaged, skilled, well-led and healthy workforce that can provide the best patient-centred care for British Columbians.

eHealth Resource
Canada

We are told that we are on the precipice of a health care crisis, and that in order to avoid it we must “bend the health care cost curve”. eHealth technologies are one way of bending the cost curve, in that they promise to enable novel efficiencies in the health care system. One such set of efficiencies relies on engaging and empowering patients in a model of delivery referred to as patient centred care (PCC).

PCC is meant, in part, to change the role of the patient within the health care system from “passive recipient” of health care services, to “active participant” in their own health care and in the health care system more broadly. Evidence suggests that empowering patients in this way produces benefits both for the patient (e.g. better health outcomes, higher satisfaction with care), and to the health care system (e.g. new efficiencies in health care delivery).
 

Patient Safety
International

Research shows that when patients are engaged in their health care, it can lead to measurable improvements in safety and quality. To promote stronger engagement, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is developing a guide to help patients, families, and health professionals work together as partners to promote improvements in care.

Database
International

This website gathers together a number of health and social care indicators. Currently these include:

  • Compendium of Population Health Indicators

A wide-ranging collection of over 1,000 indicators designed to provide a comprehensive overview of population health at a national, regional and local level. These indicators were previously available on the Clinical and Health Outcomes Knowledge Base website (also known as NCHOD).

  • GP Practice data

This is a collection of practice level data and is designed to improve healthcare and support patients in making better, informed choices about the practice they choose to register with.

  • Local Basket of Inequalities Indicators (LBOI)

This collection of 60 indicators helps organisations to measure health and other factors which influence health inequalities such as unemployment, poverty, crime and education. These indicators were previously available on the London Health Observatory website.

 

  • NHS Outcomes Framework
  • The NHS Outcomes Framework indicators will be used by the Secretary of State to hold the NHS Commissioning Board to account.

    • Summary Hospital-level Mortality Indicator (SHMI)

    SHMI is the new hospital-level indicator which uses standard and transparent methodology for reporting mortality at hospital trust level across the NHS in England.

    Research Report
    Ontario

    How small, rural and northern hospitals are innovating partnerships and building health hubs 

    International

    The EQUATOR (Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research) Network is an international initiative that seeks to improve the reliability and value of published health research literature by promoting transparent and accurate reporting and wider use of robust reporting guidelines.

    It is the first coordinated attempt to tackle the problems of inadequate reporting systematically and on a global scale; it advances the work done by individual groups over the last 15 years.

    Patient Safety
    International

    This report presents the results of an environmental scan of existing patient safety education and training programs. It presents data collected and cataloged on 333 current, active, and recurring patient safety education and training programs; a characterization of those programs by various factors, including sponsor, target audience, program objectives, delivery method, duration, and cost; and recommendations for potential future patient safety education and training efforts.

    Ontario

    eOfficeErgo: Ergonomics e-Learning for Office Workers is an evidence-based and standard-compliant online training program designed for employees who regularly use computers on the job.


    The training program was developed by the Institute for Work & Health in partnership with the Public Services Health & Safety Association (PSHSA), the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and the U.S.-based Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety.

    Teaching
    International

    The sufficient-cause model, also known as “causal pies,” is a causal model commonly taught in introductory epidemiology courses. Under the sufficient-cause model, outcomes are usually not caused by a single causative factor, but by a combination of “component causes” (exposures) that might occur minutes or years apart.1,2 A person gets the outcome only if he or she has accumulated all component causes. Together, the combination of component causes that are sufficient to cause an outcome is called a “sufficient cause.” Typically, there is more than one sufficient cause for each outcome, meaning that there are different mechanisms by which a person can get the same outcome.

    Some students struggle with the sufficient-cause model and other causal models because the concepts can seem abstract, even when examples are given. We have developed a fun and intuitive game called “Causal Pie Bingo!” that introduces students to the sufficient-cause model in a format that makes these examples more concrete.
     

    Network
    International

    The Erasmus Observatory on Health Law was founded to explore health law, share in its study, and help pioneer its development. We represent a network of faculties, students, fellows, lawyers and ethicists working to identify and engage with the challenges and opportunities of health law.

    We investigate the real and possible boundaries in health law. We do this through active rather than passive research, believing that the best way to understand health law is to actually build out into it.
     

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    As Open Access publishing continues its momentum, opportunities are growing for researchers to shift their disciplinary and institution platforms to affordable open access models. Suzanne Pilaar Birch describes her experience of getting Open Quaternary started, shedding light on article processing charges, editorial board creation and publisher ethos.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    At the 2010 National Research Service Award (NRSA) meeting, directors of T32 training programs funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) discussed the importance of sharing knowledge and working more closely together. Following this rich discussion, AHRQ issued a request for proposals for the formation of a study group to explore the feasibility of establishing a mechanism for collective knowledge production, specifically the formation of a learning collaborative. Collaborations are formed when two or more stakeholders invest their resources (e.g., talent, information, money), to solve problems that they could not solve by themselves. Central to this concept of collaboration is knowledge translation and knowledge transfer.

    Collaborations have become necessary for organizations performing complex work, with emerging technologies and rapidly changing environments. The rapidly changing field of health services research necessitates knowledge transfer and translation among health services researchers spanning multiple disciplines and housed in a number of organizations representing the public and private sectors in academic, medical, public health, and numerous other settings.

    International

    Establishing Transdisciplinary Professionalism for Improving Health Outcomes is a summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore the possibility of whether different professions can come together and whether a dialogue with society on professionalism is possible. Most of the 59 members making up the Global Forum were present at the workshop and engaged with outside participants in active dialogue around issues related to professionalism and how the different professions might work effectively together and with society in creating a social contract.

    Research Report
    International

    Electronic health data sets, including electronic health records (EHR) and other administrative databases, are rich data sources that have the potential to help answer important questions about the effects of clinical interventions as well as policy changes. However, analyses using such data are almost always non-experimental, leading to concerns that those who receive a particular intervention are likely different from those who do not, in ways that may confound the effects of interest. This paper outlines the challenges in estimating causal effects using electronic health data, and offers some solutions, with particular attention paid to propensity score methods that help ensure comparisons between similar groups. The methods are illustrated with a case study describing the design of a study using Medicare and Medicaid administrative data to estimate the effect of the Medicare Part D prescription drug program among individuals with serious mental illness.

    Network
    International

    The European Commission launched the 'Europe for Patients' campaign in September 2008. The campaign highlights a series of different healthcare and patient related policy initiatives of the Commission.

    All these initiatives are bound by a common goal: better healthcare for all in Europe. The initiatives and actions address patient safety, rare diseases, organ donation and transplantation, cancer screening, health workforce, flu and childhood vaccination, mental health, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias as well as prudent antibiotic use (see list at the end of this document). The first initiative under the campaign - the proposed Directive on cross border health care - was adopted by the Commission on 2 July 2008.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    PowerPoint presentation from Session 904 - Building a "Super" Logic Model: Development of a System of Tiered Logic Models to Identify Key Outcomes in a Large Nonprofit Organization

    International

    The Methods Lab is an action-learning collaboration between the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), BetterEvaluation (BE) and the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). The Methods Lab seeks to develop, test, and institutionalise flexible approaches to impact evaluations. It focuses on interventions which are harder to evaluate because of their diversity and complexity or where traditional impact evaluation approaches may not be feasible or appropriate, with the broader aim of identifying lessons with wider application potential.

    Focus

    This guidance note focuses on the utility of, and guidance for, evaluability assessment before undertaking an impact evaluation.


    Intended users

    The primary audience for this guidance note is evaluators conducting an evaluability assessment for impact evaluation.  The secondary audience is people commissioning or managing an evaluability assessment for impact evaluation, as well as funders of an impact evaluation.

    Education Module
    International
    • This tutorial teaches you how to evaluate the health information that you find on the Web. It is about 16 minutes long.
    • You need a Flash plug-in, version 8 or above, to view it. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start.
    • The tutorial runs automatically, but you can also use the navigation bar at the bottom of the screen to go forward, backward, pause, or start over.
    Education Module
    International

    This tutorial teaches you how to evaluate the health information that you find on the Web. It is about 16 minutes long.

    Healthcare interventions
    International

    The first case of Ebola Virus Disease (Ebola) diagnosed in the United States was reported to CDC by Dallas County Health and Human Services on September 28, 2014, and laboratory-confirmed by CDC and the Texas Laboratory Response Network (LRN) laboratory on September 30. The patient departed Monrovia, Liberia, on September 19, and arrived in Dallas, Texas, on September 20. The patient was asymptomatic during travel and upon his arrival in the United States; he fell ill on September 24 and sought medical care at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas on September 26. He was treated and released. On September 28, he returned to the same hospital, and was admitted for treatment.

    Canada

    This site lets Canadian Evaluators sign up for the Evaluation Mentoring Canada pilot program as a mentor, mentee, or both! You can search for a mentor, or notify others of your availability to mentor them. Signing up takes just a few minutes, and you can see a list of available mentors immediately.

    There is no charge to use this service; however you must have an approved registration code. To get started, please review the material in the Resources section and then email info@evaluationmentoringcanada.ca to request a registration code. Once you receive the code and register as a user, you will be able to use the site.

    This site was developed with significant involvement from volunteers in the Canadian evaluation community and with financial contributions from many Canadian Evaluation Society Chapters

    Program Evaluation
    Canada

    The following report presents key findings and recommendations resulting from an evaluation of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Knowledge Translation (KT) Funding Program. Commercialization programming, although an important aspect of CIHR's KT strategy, is not a part of this study as it is being examined in a separate ongoing CIHR evaluation.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    With the large investments required for health IT projects, stakeholders are increasingly demanding to know what the actual value of these projects has been, or will be. Evaluations allow us to determine whether or not what one has set out to accomplish has been accomplished, and to help us to understand what has worked in a given project and what has not. Lessons that emerge from evaluations help to guide both your team, as well as others, in their approach to projects in the future. Evaluations must therefore be an integral part of any health IT project.” (AHRQ Health IT Evaluation Toolkit)

    The diversity and complexity of health IT projects poses challenges for those seeking to evaluate particular projects and those interested in assessing broader population impact. While support for such evaluations can be found in ongoing health service research projects (explore the database Health Services Research Projects in Progress, as well in the proliferation of Toolkits from diverse public and non-profit sources (see below), there is also an increasing literature assessing evaluation techniques and approaches appropriate for health IT interventions, particularly those related to implementation of the requirements for “Meaningful Use.” 

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Expert Lecture Sponsored by the Presidential Strand Chair - Gail Barrington, Barrington Research Group Inc Presenter - Melanie Barwick, The Hospital for Sick Children Discussant - Daniel Stufflebeam, Western Michigan University

    Presentation

    Program Evaluation
    International

    Evaluation is an essential part of quality improvement and when done well it can help solve problems,
    inform decision making and build knowledge. While evaluation comes in many shapes and sizes, its key
    purpose is to help us to develop a deeper understanding of how best to improve health care.

    People involved in quality improvement often ask the Health Foundation about how to approach evaluation.  Inspired by the most commonly asked questions, this guide is intended to assist those new to evaluation by suggesting methodological and practical considerations and providing resources to support further learning. 

    Evidence-based practice
    BC

    Evidence 2 Excellence (E2E) is a not-for-profit academic organization established to improve clinical and operational outcomes for emergency departments across British Columbia. E2E provides a grass roots collaborative model for improvement and knowledge translation by working directly with teams and connecting sites across the province through an online community.

    Advanced Practice Nursing
    International

    Nurse Practitioners (NPs)

    In a review of studies comparing the primary care provided by NPs to primary care provided by physicians (MDs), researchers found that patients of both groups had comparable health outcomes. NPs were found to out perform MDs in measures of consultation time, patient follow-up, and patient satisfaction (Naylor and Kurtzman 2010).

    Two recent international systematic reviews report no differences between patients treated by NPs and MDs in terms of health outcomes, type of care provided, or resources used. They also found patients seeing NPs were more satisfied and had longer consultations (Horrocks et al., 2002; Laurant et al., 2008).

    Knowledge Translation
    BC

    Nursing Knowledge Exchange newsletter from Fraser Health Authority

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    Systematic reviews and syntheses of evidence are increasingly used to inform public policy decisions. Growing budgetary pressures mean that decision makers often need to consider evidence on the costs and efficiency of alternatives as well as their effects. There are a number of methodological challenges in the identification, appraisal, synthesis, interpretation and use of economic evidence. This article draws on a recently published edited volume to review the latest developments, proposals and controversies in these aspects of economic evidence synthesis methodology. It focuses on two broad classes of approach: systematic review to summarize and compare the findings of existing economic analyses and synthesis of new economic results using decision models. The availability and scope of economic evidence is currently limited in many fields, but improving. Increased engagement between economists, the wider evidence synthesis community, and decision makers is needed to improve both the production and use of economic evidence. Further research to improve the evidence base that underpins application of economic evidence synthesis methodology will need to embrace a broader range of methods than economic evaluation and systematic review alone.

    Evidence-based practice
    Ontario

    Florence Nightingale would probably not recognise the nurse of today. As we move into the next millennium, we expect nurses to care with their hearts and minds; identify patients' actual and potential health problems; and develop research-based strategies to prevent, ameliorate, and comfort. We increasingly expect them to undertake work historically done by doctors; we also expect them to be empathic communicators who are highly educated, critical thinkers, and abreast of all the important research findings.

    Research makes a difference. In a meta-analysis designed to determine the contribution of research-based practice to patient outcomes, Heater and colleagues reported that patients who receive research-based nursing care make "sizeable gains" in behavioural knowledge, and physiological and psychosocial outcomes compared with those receiving routine nursing care.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    This website provides a collection of links to evidence-based practice, including:

    • Resources
    • Reviews
    • Guidelines
    • Critiques
    • Calculators
    • Statistics
    • Research Centres
    • Literature
    Evidence-based practice
    International

    The ANCC Magnet Recognition Program® (MRP) requires hospitals to have evidence-based practice embedded in the culture of the organization. In the documentation, hospitals must demonstrate that nurses evaluate and use published research in all aspects of clinical and operational processes.

    The ANCC also expects nurses to conduct research projects and that knowledge from these projects will be shared with nurses within and outside the organization.

    Although the two requirements have the potential for overlapping concepts in the minds of many nurses, evidence-based practice and research projects are distinctly different—and, if the differences are not recognized, it is possible for an organization's documentation to fail to adequately explain how it meets both requirements.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    The ANCC Magnet Recognition Program® (MRP) requires hospitals to have evidence-based practice embedded in the culture of the organization. In the documentation, hospitals must demonstrate that nurses evaluate and use published research in all aspects of clinical and operational processes.

    The ANCC also expects nurses to conduct research projects and that knowledge from these projects will be shared with nurses within and outside the organization.

    Although the two requirements have the potential for overlapping concepts in the minds of many nurses, evidence-based practice and research projects are distinctly different—and, if the differences are not recognized, it is possible for an organization's documentation to fail to adequately explain how it meets both requirements.
     

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    The ANCC Magnet Recognition Program® (MRP) requires hospitals to have evidence-based practice embedded in the culture of the organization. In the documentation, hospitals must demonstrate that nurses evaluate and use published research in all aspects of clinical and operational processes.

    The ANCC also expects nurses to conduct research projects and that knowledge from these projects will be shared with nurses within and outside the organization.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    Tools and Resources

    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins is dedicated to providing healthcare professionals with the information they need to improve practice and improve patient outcomes. The Evidence-Based Practice Network team has pulled together a collection of articles and journals from Lippincott publications, from a variety of disciplines, in order to provide you with credible, reliable information in which to base your practice.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    There are 4 basic steps in Evidence Based Practice*

    • Step 1 - Convert your information need into an answerable question
    • Step 2 - Find the best evidence
    • Step 3 - Appraise search results for validity and usefulness
    • Step 4 - Apply the findings to your clinical practice and evaluate your professional performance

    The basic aim of this tutorial is to walk you through these steps in an effort to make the process easier and more understandable for you.

    Let’s take an example and work through the process. You may want to use this worksheet as you proceed through the tutorial.

    Scenario:
    Infections in hospitals can be spread on the hands of healthcare workers. It takes minutes to follow the hand hygiene policy exactly before entering a room to deliver patient care. On a busy hospital unit where nurses care for many critically ill patients, those minutes add up. Many hospitals have turned to alcohol-based handrubs to save time and put hand cleaners closer to patients. You are wondering if alcohol based handrubs placed inside the patients rooms would increase the incidence of handwashing and decrease nosocomial infection.

    *adapted from: Sackett DL, Straus SE, Richardson WS [and others]. Evidence-Based Medicine: How to Practice and Teach EBM. 2nd ed. London: Churchill-Livingstone, 2000:3-4.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    Between 2000 and 2005, the incidence of hospitalizations for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) nearly doubled. So did the fatality rate from this infection. Risk factors for CDI (such as the use of certain antibiotics and gastric acid suppressors, age over 65, and hospitalization) are so common that CDI poses a continuing danger.

    To help reduce that danger, recent research has identified ways for you and your colleagues to prevent and manage CDI, including these evidence-based guidelines
     

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    This tutorial is designed for students in healthcare fields, medical professionals, faculty, and anyone else interested in evidence-based practice. This tutorial comprises two lessons:

    Lesson 1: The 5-Step Process
    In Lesson 1, you will learn about the 5-step process for evidence-based practice.

    Lesson 2: Using EBP—Case Scenarios
    In Lesson 2, you will have the opportunity to roll up your (virtual) sleeves and apply the 5-step process. You’ll explore several case scenarios and determine how you would handle them.

    This tutorial also includes references for you to explore as you choose. Access these by clicking the References button in the navigation bar above.
     

    Canada

    Assessment tool by CREOD helps point the way forward for joint health and safety committees

    A new tool is available to help people who sit on joint health and safety committees (JHSCs) assess the strengths and weaknesses of their committee—and generate discussions on what areas of their committee need improvement.

    This free tool, a 21-item questionnaire, is one of the outcomes of a research project on the form and function of JHSCs in Ontario’s health-care sector, led by Dr. Kathryn Nichol of the Centre for Research Expertise on Occupational Disease (CREOD). Available on the CREOD website, the tool assesses a broad range of committee activities: Are members approachable? How well does the JHSC communicate health and safety information to the staff? Does the committee participate in critical accident and injury investigations? Do committee members receive adequate training?

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Traditional methods of communicating research don’t appeal to an online audience. But academics can’t just rely on charisma and trust when communicating to online viewers. Dorothy Bishop experiments with how to keep everyone happy.

    Here’s an interesting test for those on Twitter. You see a tweet giving a link to an interesting topic. You click on the link and see it’s a YouTube piece. Do you (a) feel pleased that it’s something you can watch or (b) immediately lose interest? The answer is likely to depend on content, but also on how long it is. Typically, if I see a video is longer than 3 minutes, I’ll give up unless it looks super-interesting. 

    Evidence-based practice
    Canada

    ARE HOSPITAL FUNDING MECHANISMS IN CANADA DESIGNED TO PROVIDE EFFICIENT CARE?
    Canadian governments are spending more on healthcare than ever. Driven by technological innovation, population aging, inflation and other factors, public healthcare expenditures are forecast to continue to increase, causing concern about the sustainability of Canada’s publicly funded systems. The hospital sector accounts for over 28% of total healthcare expenditures in Canada. Although this share has fallen considerably over the past few decades, hospitals continue to represent the largest single component of healthcare expenditures. Hospital expenditures are
    projected to exceed $55 billion in 2010. 

    Evidence suggests that provinces differ in terms of healthcare spending efficiency, which implies that there should be an opportunity for improvement. An often-cited source of inefficiency in the Canadian hospital sector is the reliance on ‘global budgets’ as the primary source of hospital funding. Global budgets can perpetuate inefficient care because they offer little incentive to reduce costs or foster innovation.

    Based on a paper commissioned by CHSRF,this brief provides a summary of the available evidence on promising hospital funding options and their impact on the following goals: timely and equitable access, optimal volume of care, quality, efficiency and constraining future cost increases.

    Alberta

    Researchers have investigated nurse staffing from the perspective of scheduling and productivity as well as the relationship between nurse staffing and client outcomes. Over time, evolving definitions of nurse staffing have identified additional key elements that support models for determining optimal staffing. These elements include the appropriateness of the number of staff, the type or level of client care required, skill level and mix of staff, number of clients cared for on the assignment, cost efficiency and effectiveness, and their links to client and nurse outcomes (RNAO, 2007).

    Research Resources
    International

    BMJ Group and McMaster University's Health Information Research Unit are collaborating to provide you with access to current best evidence from research, tailored to your own health care interests, to support evidence-based clinical decisions.

    This service is unique: all citations (from over 120 premier clinical journals) are pre-rated for quality by research staff, then rated for clinical relevance and interest by at least 3 members of a worldwide panel of practicing physicians. Here's what we offer:

    • A searchable database of the best evidence from the medical literature
    • An email alerting system
    • Links to selected evidence-based resources
    International

    Evidently Cochrane aims to make Cochrane evidence really accessible, and to encourage discussion about it, through weekly blogs, which usually feature new or updated Cochrane reviews on a health topic. It is for everyone who is interested in finding and using the best quality evidence to inform decisions about health.

    First Nations
    Canada

    ‘Mapping’ Indigenous Health Values as Interpreted Through the CanMEDS Framework

    Journal
    International

    At various points in my career I've enjoyed the benefit of employer sponsored educational programs provided by top leadership and professional services consulting firms. The programs focused on how excellent patient care and outstanding employee satisfaction could be achieved through good communication, coaching and mentoring, team building and talent management.

    Employee Engagement

    What does being an engaged employee mean to you? Some people describe it as being empowered, self motivated, going above and beyond, taking the initiative, having a passion for their job. One individual even told me that engagement meant "getting married to your job."

    In fact, this reference to a relationship sparked considerable thought on my part as I struggled to understand why some employees are top performers and others, with the same apparent level of education and skill, are more problematic than productive. My conclusion is that some employees are stuck in a mindset of compliance while their more successful counterparts are committed to their organization's success. Yet, in individual organizations, how could this gap between workforce compliance and commitment occur if employees are immersed in the same culture?

    An organization's culture is about the values and beliefs shared by its members and stakeholders. A Watson Wyatt Work Study reported that "organizations whose employees understand the mission and goals enjoy a 29% greater return than other firms."1-3 Another survey reported that "a majority (93-97%) of the Fortune 500 companies have a mission, vision, and values statement, but only three to seven percent of employees know of it and work by it."4
     

    Evidence-based practice
    Canada

    BACKGROUND: In older adults, diminished balance is associated with reduced physical functioning and an increased risk of falling. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2007.
    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of exercise interventions on balance in older people, aged 60 and over, living in the community or in institutional care.
    SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1), MEDLINE and EMBASE (to February 2011).
    SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled studies testing the effects of exercise interventions on balance in older people. The primary outcomes of the review were clinical measures of balance.
    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Pairs of review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data from studies. Data were pooled where appropriate.
    MAIN RESULTS: This update included 94 studies (62 new) with 9,917 participants. Most participants were women living in their own home. Most trials were judged at unclear risk of selection bias, generally reflecting inadequate reporting of the randomisation methods, but at high risk of performance bias relating to lack of participant blinding, which is largely unavoidable for these trials. Most studies only reported outcome up to the end of the exercise programme. There were eight categories of exercise programmes. These are listed below together with primary measures of balance for which there was some evidence of a statistically significant effect at the end of the exercise programme. Some trials tested more than one type of exercise. Crucially, the evidence for each outcome was generally from only a few of the trials for each exercise category.

    Patient Safety
    International

    This toolkit outlines a powerful and proven way of improving patients' experience of services, and helps you to understand how it can help you meet your aims. A 2013 global survey discovered that EBCD projects had either been implemented, or were being planned in more than 60 health care organisations, in countries including Australia, Canada, England, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, and the United States.

    As well as step-by-step guidance, the toolkit includes videos of people who have taken part in EBCD projects. These help bring to life the successes and range of benefits that can result from implementing this type of improvement project. The toolkit also includes downloadable resources such as template forms, letters, presentations and other materials, to help you plan and carry out this approach.

    Research Report
    Ontario

    This is the first in a series of two documents that highlight the findings from a study entitled, Exploring Clinical Information and Communication of Healthcare Professionals in Homecare: Resources, Challenges and Solutions. The team included Dr. Diane Doran, Ivana Matic and Dr. Sima Ajami. This
    work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and industrial and government partners, through the Healthcare Support through Information Technology Enhancements (hSITE) Strategic Research Network.

    Knowledge Translation
    Quebec

    Designed with a view to supporting action, this document first presents an overview of existing knowledge about the translation of knowledge in the health field. On the basis of the available literature, this knowledge review identifies the main elements to consider when attempting to implement more structured knowledge translation practices. This information is synthesized and a dynamic and integrated conceptualization of the knowledge translation process is presented in the next section. The document's annexes include a tool for facilitating a knowledge transfer process and a summary diagram that illustrates at a glance the contents of this publication. 

    Patient Safety
    International

    Falls are the most common cause of injury in older adults. The experience of being hospitalized puts adults at further risk for falls because of illness and the newness of the hospital environment. Unfamiliar surroundings, medications and treatments given in the hospital setting along with decrease in activity level, can cause patients to become mentally confused, weak and unsteady. Even patients who were active and independent at home may require assistance to safely complete simple activities while they are in the hospital, such as such as getting out of bed or using the bathroom.

    Evidence-based practice
    Canada

    Family meetings are an important part of a patient’s care plan in hospital, but they often happen late in admission or at critical decision-making junctions. Clear, effective communication among patients, families, and health care teams enhances patient care and patient satisfaction, which correlate with physician competency in communication.

    Family meetings are useful to discuss patient status and goals of care.  When held proactively, and when they include not only the medical facts, but also the patient’s perspective on his or her illness
    and the development of a care plan, family meetings have been shown to reduce time in intensive care, allow for earlier withdrawal of advanced supportive technology without increasing mortality rates, and allow for dying patients to access palliative care earlier.

    Patient Safety
    Canada

    In the modern economy, many industries, such as aviation, retail and manufacturing, no longer slow down over weekends. Yet hospitals have mostly resisted this trend, even though demand for many forms of health care is no less on weekends than on weekdays.

    While most hospitals are open every day of the week, many operate with substantially reduced staffing levels on holidays and weekends.

    A typical internal medicine ward at a teaching hospital in Ontario, for example, might function with only one-third of the doctors on the weekend that it would have on a weekday. And the most senior of these doctors will have left the hospital by early afternoon. Allied health professionals (such as physiotherapists and dieticians) are often also absent on weekends, with only nurses staffed in numbers that are comparable to weekday staffing levels.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    In today’s scientific realm, a large amount of the research being conducted is never published in any way. Unpublished research could include negative data, unexplained observations, or simply data that are not deemed “interesting” enough to any journal. Given the continued reduction in research funding in many areas around the world, should investigators waste their time on research that may have already been done (but not published)? What if researchers could easily publish data that would otherwise be simply left alone and never shared? And what if those data could be accessed, reused, and cited by others?

    Figshare offers an effective solution to the issue of the incredible amounts of unpublished data sitting on researchers’ computers around the world. At figshare, researchers can sign up for free accounts and upload data in any file format (common uploads include figures, posters, full manuscripts, raw data sets, and videos). All data are published immediately under a Creative Commons license, allowing for instantaneous discovery by anyone around the world. Perhaps more importantly, each contribution is given its own digital object identifier (DOI), a unique identifying code that provides a permanent link to the file in question. DOIs are found with increasing frequency in reference lists, meaning that items on figshare can be cited easily in peer-reviewed literature if desired.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Free, safe photo sharing for healthcare professionals

    "I developed Figure 1 because I wanted a safe way to share medical images with the medical community, while protecting patients’ privacy."

    Joshua Landy, MD, Co-Founder

    eHealth Resource
    Canada

    Figure 1 is a community for medical and nursing professionals to safely share clinical cases and discuss treatment. Join over 150,000 healthcare professionals expanding their knowledge of medicine and contribute your own medical cases in a privacy-conscious way. 

    Professional Development
    Ontario

    The Nursing Health Services Research Unit at the University of Toronto reviewed both nurse‐specific evidence and evidence from other professions as well as models of leadership development initiatives at the point of care. This research is intended to support policy development and planning to improve Ontario’s health system.

    The objectives of this study were to:

    • Conduct a comprehensive literature review of currently or recently implemented health professional leadership development initiatives around the world
    • Identify relevant leading practices and programs, or innovations of new nursing and allied health roles or models, with demonstrated evidence of quality work environment or quality patient care outcomes at the point of care
    • Engage with key informants knowledgeable about front‐line health professional leadership development initiatives for further research evidence
    • Analyze literature and consultations with key informants, to derive major themes throughout leadership initiatives with evidence of successful outcomes. Barriers and facilitators to building leadership capacity were also examined.
    • Formulate conclusions and recommendations that will provide evidence to support policy development and leadership opportunities for frontline nurses
    • Develop a chart of the leading frameworks, programs and practices for developing health professionals as leaders, with further details and key contacts for follow‐up
    Care delivery innovation
    Ontario

    Ontario Renal Network

    The National Kidney Foundation Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF KDOQI) ™ has provided evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and related complications since 1997. Recognized throughout the world for improving the diagnosis and treatment of kidney disease, the KDOQI Guidelines have changed the practices of numerous specialties and disciplines and improved the lives of thousands of kidney patients
     

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    A series of video tutorials on the various evidence-based practice (EBP) information resources. The series is called "Find It Fast" because all of these resources may help you find clinical information faster. The first three episodes will explain some basic terminologies and theories used in this series of tutorials. Then the following EBP resources will be demoed: the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ACP's PIER, Clinical Evidence, ACP Journal Club, the "Evidence-based ..." series of journals, Clinical Queries in MEDLINE and the EBP meta-search engine TRIP.

    Research Resources
    International

    Healthcare decision makers—including clinicians and other healthcare providers—increasingly turn to systematic reviews for reliable, evidence-based comparisons of health interventions. Systematic reviews identify, select, assess, and synthesize the findings of similar but separate studies. They can help clarify what is known and not known about the potential benefits and harms of drugs, devices, and other healthcare services. But the quality of systematic reviews varies; often the scientific rigor of the collected literature is not scrutinized or there are errors in data extraction and meta-analysis.

    Patient Safety
    International

    Healthcare decision makers—including clinicians and other healthcare providers—increasingly turn to systematic reviews for reliable, evidence-based comparisons of health interventions. Systematic reviews identify, select, assess, and synthesize the findings of similar but separate studies. They can help clarify what is known and not known about the potential benefits and harms of drugs, devices, and other healthcare services. But the quality of systematic reviews varies; often the scientific rigor of the collected literature is not scrutinized or there are errors in data extraction and meta-analysis.

    First Nations
    BC

    The First Nations Health Council was created in 2007 to implement the 10-year Tripartite First Nations Health Plan on behalf of BC First Nations. The Plan's goal is to improve the health and well-being of First Nations and to close the health gap between First Nations and other British Columbians.

    First Nations
    Canada

    Developed in partnership with First Nations, the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework
    (the Framework) presents a shared vision for the future of First Nations mental wellness programs and
    services and practical steps towards achieving that vision. A response to the mental health and substance use issues that continue to be a priority concern for many First Nations communities, the Framework’s overarching goal is to improve mental wellness outcomes for First Nations.

    Academic Nursing
    International

    As health care delivery is transforming before our eyes, nursing schools throughout the country are working to prepare nurses for the future--in a health care environment that focuses on technology, care coordination and patient-centered models. Although the fundamentals of good nursing care will undoubtedly withstand the test of time, experts point to new “must-have” characteristics and skills that will help student nurses meet tomorrow's nursing challenges.

    Journal Club
    Canada

    Background: Many interventions found to be effective in health services research studies fail to translate into meaningful patient care outcomes across multiple contexts. Health services researchers recognize the need to evaluate not only summative outcomes but also formative outcomes to assess the extent to which implementation is effective in a specific setting, prolongs sustainability, and promotes dissemination into other settings. Many implementation theories have been published to help promote effective implementation. However, they overlap considerably in the constructs included in individual theories, and a comparison of theories reveals that each is missing important constructs included in other theories. In addition, terminology and definitions are not consistent across theories. We describe the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) that offers an overarching typology to promote implementation theory development and verification about what works where and why across multiple contexts.

    Research Resources
    International

    Are you getting the best out of your referencing software? Ellie Harries tackles Mendeley, Zotero and EndNote in a browse at the choices available for those who find themselves stuck in a referencing rut.

    Referencing is an essential feature of all academic research and rapid technological advances have contributed to the proliferation of programmes which can help researchers systematically manage their references. Referencing software allows researchers to build up personal libraries of articles, notes and citations and some tools even allow you to share papers and notes with colleagues. While all this is great, there so many options available that it can be hard to know where to begin. To help you make the right choice, this blog provides a short overview of three key reference management tools out there.

    Program Evaluation
    International

    GEO offers grantmakers a practical perspective on how to increase the capacity of their organizations to tap the transformative power of evaluation for learning. With key questions, guidelines and action steps, this new guide equips grantmakers to tackle evaluation for learning with “four essentials”: Lead, Plan, Organize and Share.

    Academic Nursing
    International

    Curt Rice examines the tension between academic freedom and open access policies. Coercive requirements to publish in open access journals could restrict academic freedom and this must be monitored. But he finds that overall, open access policies strengthen academic freedom in many more ways, particularly through copyright, interference, citations, and archiving issues.

    Program Evaluation
    International

    The information in this report is intended to help health care decisionmakers—patients and clinicians, health system leaders, and policymakers, among others—make well informed decisions and thereby improve the quality of health care services. This report is not intended to be a substitute for the application of clinical judgment. Anyone who makes decisions concerning the provision of clinical care should consider this report in the same way as any medical reference and in conjunction with all other pertinent information, i.e., in the context of available resources and circumstances presented by individual patients.  

    This report may be used, in whole or in part, as the basis for development of clinical practice guidelines and other quality enhancement tools, or as a basis for reimbursement and coverage policies. AHRQ or U.S. Department of Health and Human Services endorsement of such derivative products may not be stated or implied. 

    Research Resources
    BC

    We have developed a Research Toolkit that provides practical "how to" guides and tools for novice/new researchers and for those who wish to improve their research skills knowledge.

    Program Evaluation
    International

    Rural and medically underserved areas often have challenges including both increased health disparities and population health issues combined with limited resources and healthcare providers to help meet these challenges. The use of appropriate program evaluation measures can help to assess what actually works for rural health settings since many evidence-based strategies are based on urban and non-rural populations.

    Statistical Resources
    International

    Free Statistical Software, Data and Resources

    Knowledge Translation
    Manitoba

    Manitoba Centre for Health Policy.

    This report summarizes the results of Phase 1 of the Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) funded From Evidence to Action project (2005-2008). The purpose of From Evidence to Action is to identify barriers specific to evidence-informed health service planning and decision making (EIDM) with regional health authorities (RHAs), and to develop strategies, credible to decision-makers, to address these barriers. Project partners included all eleven RHAs in Manitoba, along with the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy. From Evidence to Action was based on a key finding of the evaluation of The Need to Know Project: the importance of addressing organizational barriers to research use in RHA planning and decision-making. The Need to Know Team members form the Advisory Committee for the project.

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    This work focuses on practical innovations that each province and territory can put to use to enhance patient care and improve value for taxpayers. The recommendations presented today to Premiers, that provinces and territories intend to implement as they deem appropriate to their health care system, include:

    • promoting the adoption of clinical practice guidelines for treating heart disease and diabetes;
    • pursuing a number of team based models to increase access for Canadians, such as the Collaborative Emergency Centres Model and other models listed in the report;
    • sharing information on health human resources management and supply;
    • improving communication about health human resources labour markets; and
    • having the Working Group monitor the progress made on the initiatives contained in this first report.
    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    CPHA is pleased to launch a new platform to facilitate the exchange of real-life experiences, tools and resources about initiatives implemented by communities and their health and social service organizations to improve health and address health equity through the social determinants of health (SDH). These experiences are drawn from sites across Canada, touching on a wide range of SDH-related issues and benefiting a variety of populations.

    Program Evaluation
    International

    This conceptual paper explores fundamental issues in assessing implementation. Fundamental issues have received attention in the literature, but have yet to be compiled in a decision framework. Assessing implementation provides important information regarding program feasibility, interpretation of program outcomes, and program theory. Implementation assessment is of particular importance in practical or real-world settings, which lack the control of clinical trials or laboratory settings. Five fundamental issues identified in literature are presented in the form of decisions evaluators make when planning implementation assessment. Fundamental decisions include (1) a theoretical approach of fidelity or adaptation; (2) a focus on delivery or receipt; (3) measurement of quantity, quality, or structure; (4) consideration of implementation globally or of specific program components; and (5) systematic manipulation of implementation or naturalistic observation. Fundamental decisions are explored using actual or hypothetical examples in education and prevention programs.

    Rural Health
    Ontario

    Statistics suggest that the prevalence of maladies, medical conditions and probability for medical conditions exist more intensely in rural areas, yet no noteworthy studies have been directed primarily to the sector. A group of residents and healthcare professionals in a rural Ontario community in Huron County propose to create a centre to research healthcare issues in rural populations, the first community-driven rural research centre in Canada. Most of healthcare-related research conducted in Canada and elsewhere is based on results of surveys taken of test populations close to large urban medical centres of learning or practice, with projections of results for rural sector populations.

    First Nations
    BC

    BC First Nations Leaders and Health Directors and technicians came together in an historic meeting to determine the future direction of an initiative to restructure health care for First Nations in British Columbia. Held in Richmond on May 24-26th, the meeting – Gathering Wisdom IV was attended by an unprecedented level of First Nations leaders in BC.

    International

    Irrespective of the traits they study, social and behavioral scientists understand that no two people will express a given trait in exactly the same manner. Variation is the rule, and social and behavioral researchers try to uncover the reasons for those differences.

    Historically, research in social and behavioral science has focused on environmental contributions to human variation, while biologists studied inherited variation in anatomy and physiology. Yet exciting newer research suggest that genes and environment participate in a complicated dynamic to influence not only health and disease, but also social and behavioral traits.

    The nature/nurture debate has confounded research on social and behavioral phenotypes since the late nineteenth century. This program takes the position that the debate is unhelpful and misleading, because no gene operates outside of an environment - beginning with the environment of the cell and extending to the influences of the external world.
     

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    Helping nurses assess and manage pain in older adults
    Free evidence-based tools and best practices for nurses who work in nursing homes.

    Pain is under-recognized and undertreated in older persons, particularly those who reside in the nursing home. In long-term care settings, the prevalence of pain can be as high as 85% and impacts the quality of life of this vulnerable population. Pain is a common condition and deserves to be recognized and effectively treated. Clinical practice guidelines are available from the American Geriatric Society (AGS) and the American Medical Directors Association (AMDA) to guide clinical decision-making related to assessment and management of pain in older adults. However, barriers, misconceptions and knowledge gaps impact good pain care.

    The purpose of this web resource (GeriatricPain.org) is to identify and share best practice tools and resources that support recommendations for good pain assessment and management in older adults. The web site is organized into categories of emphasis with tools selected to assist nurses with responsibility for pain care in the nursing home.
     

    Healthcare interventions
    International

    Promotional Materials for Get Smart About Anitbiotics Week

    These materials can be placed in newsletters, journals, or other print and digital outlets. Permission is not needed to print, copy, or distribute any of these CDC materials.

    Care delivery innovation
    Ontario

    Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic

    A Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic can provide ongoing care while helping promote disease prevention and healthy living. Nurse practitioners can diagnose and treat common injuries and illnesses, write some prescriptions and order blood and diagnostic tests. You can also find nurse practitioners working throughout the province in Family Health Teams and other types of clinics.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Most researchers and communication specialists who work on international health are passionate about their work and about making a difference and improving health and health care. Such a vision can be enshrined in institutional mission statements.

    For example, the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (where I work as a senior lecturer) has a mission statement that highlights the importance of promoting ‘improved health, particularly for people of the less developed countries in the tropics and sub-tropics’.

    Donors are also clearly concerned about ensuring the research they fund has impact and does not simply gather dust on library shelves. Research proposals increasingly need a clear impact section, and these really matter in whether grants are won or not. For example the impact section accounts for a third of the marks for EU research proposals. A new Supplement of Health Research Policy and Systems, which I co-edited, explored the process of getting research into policy and practice, and provides useful learning for researchers grappling with research communications and the impact of their research.

    Knowledge Translation
    Ontario

    Objective: This feature article on knowledge transfer presents principles and strategies to support the development of short communiqués to end-users.

    Participants: Formal and informal knowledge brokers are the targeted users of the strategies.

    Methods: Research studies and conceptual literature in knowledge transfer informed the development of brief-Knowledge Transfer (b-KT) principles. Principles are explained and a sample of how they informed the development of KIT-Tip Sheets is offered to promote ways to use principles in knowledge dissemination.

    Results: b-KT principles can be used as a framework to guide the development of short communiqués by knowledge brokers in work practice but also in the health, social and rehabilitation domains. In addition, these principles promote the participation of end-users in the development of knowledge transfer.

    Conclusions: Formal evaluation is needed on the use of these principles in achieving the uptake and use of knowledge by end-users.

    Research Project
    International

    This report examines eleven emerging technologies that have the potential to improve care and lower costs for chronic disease patients.

    The full report gives an in-depth analysis of the clinical and financial benefits of each of the eleven technologies and offers an overview of the barriers that hold back their adoption. The eleven emerging technologies that offer new ways to monitor and manage chronic illnesses are:

    Extended Care eVisits
    Home Telehealth
    In-Car Telehealth
    Medication Adherence Tools
    Mobile Asthma Management Tools
    Mobile Cardiovascular Tools
    Mobile Clinical Decision Support
    Mobile Diabetes Management Tools
    Social Media Promoting Health
    Tele-Stroke Care
    Virtual Visits

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Though originally developed as a way to share and merge software code, any types of files can be part of a GitHub repository, making it a great collaborative tool for academics, finds Kris Shaffer. Since any open-licensed project can be hosted on GitHub for free, it can function as a publishing platform, a peer-review system, a learning management tool, and a locus for intra- and inter-institutional collaboration.

    One of the chief goals of liberal education is the creation and curation of human knowledge. As I discussed in my previous article, this necessarily involves critiquing and building on the work of others, and doing so publicly and accessibly. How can we as a community of scholars facilitate this work? How can a scholar or pedagogue make an article, an assignment, a syllabus, a book, a database, or a website available for others in a manner that makes it easy for another to rework and redeploy? Putting a PDF on a website is not enough, even for materials of moderate complexity. We need tools that make it relatively easy to put the ideology of liberal education into practice, from the simple class assignment to the multimedia textbook. One such tool is GitHub.

    International

    A forum for sharing research and best practices worldwide in the prevention of needlesticks and occupational exposures to bloodborne pathogens.

    Defining the problem...

    Healthcare workers are a critical resource in every corner of the globe -- the infrastructure without which healthcare cannot exist. But in caring for us, they place themselves at risk daily of contracting life-threatening infections from bloodborne pathogens, including HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Injuries from needles and other sharp medical devices, along with accidental exposures to blood and body fluids from splashes and sprays, are the most serious occupational hazard faced by healthcare workers.
     

    Patient Safety
    Canada

    Safe care . . . accepting no less.

    Frontline healthcare providers and healthcare organizations around the world are looking for and developing solutions to patient safety incidents and challenges.

    Global Patient Safety Alerts is an innovative information-sharing resource to help you prevent and mitigate patient safety incidents in your organization and help others succeed.

    Here you’ll find more than 800 patient safety incident advisories, alerts, and recommendations. Learn what works and share your own insights and solutions with healthcare providers, healthcare organizations, patients, and the public.

    You’ll also find customizable, evidence-based tools you can start using immediately to help you achieve your goals.

    By asking, listening, and talking to one another, we can grow our own patient safety and quality initiatives and help others grow theirs. Join the conversation and get the solutions you need today.
     

    Care delivery innovation
    International

    This briefing looks at the case of Cambridge University Health Partners, the management organisation of the Cambridge Academic Health Science Centre (AHSC).  An AHSC is a partnership between one or more universities and healthcare providers focusing on the tripartite mission of research, clinical care and teaching. AHSCs work on the principle that the collaboration between university and healthcare providers creates greater value than their operating alone. Our briefing reports on the nature and characteristic of one such partnership, and how such outcomes are achieved collaboratively.

    Grant-writing
    BC

    Share. Learn. Perform.
    Welcome!
    If you are a grant facilitator or are otherwise involved in the grants process, this website is meant for you. This site will help you through the planning, preparation and submission of grants.
    The goals of this site are to:
    • develop resources to help new facilitators become oriented to the grant facilitation role
    • provide templates and tools for all stages of the grant facilitation process
    • teach facilitators how they can harness technology to stay informed on funding opportunities and agency news
    • provide resources for facilitators to develop their administrative and project management skills
    • create a virtual network and a sense of community among grant facilitators
     

    Grant-writing
    Canada

    Resources provide tips and strategies for writing effective grant proposals from McMaster University.

    Grant-writing
    Canada

    Tips from McGill University Health Centre.

    Grant-writing
    BC

    A resource from the BC Environmental and Occupational Health Research Network. Learn about:

    • how to search for grant funding
    • getting started with small grants
    • the anatomy of a grant application
    • common concerns of grant reviewers
    • building partnerships
    • and much more!

    Research Resources
    Canada

    Go beyond the “grey zone”: Take advantage of some of the best IS expertise among HTA agencies worldwide with CADTH’s new online resource for grey literature searching, Grey matters: a practical search tool for evidence-based medicine.

    Program Evaluation
    BC

    This project developed a process to help government organizations ensure that their key performance indicators are relevant to clients and stakeholders.

    The report was discussed by the Legislative Assembly’s Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts on February 9, 2011.
     

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    Knowledge translation (KT) is about raising knowledge users' awareness of research findings and facilitating the use of those findings. Only a minority of researchers would call themselves experts in KT, and with KT still an emerging field, there exists a need to build capacity not only in developing research proposals with a KT approach but also in assessing those proposals for scientific merit and potential impact. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has written this guide as one resource to fill this knowledge gap. We hope this guide will help to strengthen projects that involve a KT approach, while also ensuring that the review of KT within grant proposals is more rigorous and transparent.

    The guide is divided into two sections, each tailored to one of CIHR's two forms of KT: integrated knowledge translation (iKT) and end-of-grant KT. Integrated knowledge translation requires that knowledge users (who will be described later in this guide) be members of the research team and participate in many stages of the research process. End-of-grant KT requires applicants to submit a plan for how they will translate their findings when the research is completed. It is worth noting that iKT programs require a dissemination plan, so those involved with iKT proposals should consult both sections. As mentioned, there is a section in the guide specific to each approach. The target audience for this guide is CIHR applicants and reviewers, but the concepts are transferable to a broader audience
     

    Patient Safety
    International

    Research shows that when patients are engaged in their health care, it can lead to measurable improvements in safety and quality. To promote stronger engagement, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality developed the Guide to Patient and Family Engagement in Hospital Quality and Safety, a tested, evidence-based resource to help hospitals work as partners with patients and families to improve quality and safety.

    Network
    Canada

    The Guideline Implementability Research and Application Network (GIRAnet) links guideline developers, implementers, and researchers to identify, develop, evaluate and share guideline implementability tools (GItools). Implementability refers to characteristics of guidelines that enhance their implementation by users. GItools provide users with context-specific advice or instruments to identify barriers, implement guidelines, assess costs, engage patients or evaluate guideline-related performance.

    The GItool Directory can be searched or browsed to identify and access GItools. It features a sample of GItools that were assembled by searching guidelines and a variety of other sources. Each GItool record includes a link, basic description, and assessment based on criteria that were established through consultation with the international guideline community. The guideline community can contribute to this resource by submitting information about a GItool that they or others developed.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    A variety of systems have been developed to grade evidence and develop recommendations based on the available evidence. However, development of guidelines for medical tests is especially challenging given the typical indirectness of the evidence; direct evidence of the effects of testing on patient important outcomes is usually absent. We compared grading systems for medical tests on how they use evidence in guideline development.
     

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    “Transparency through timely, controlled and effective communication.”

    Increasingly healthcare and health professional organizations are being called upon to share information about “adverse events” with key stakeholders (both internal and external), the broader public and the media in a timely and transparent way.

    These guidelines were developed by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute in conjunction with CPSI’s
    Communication Advisory Committee to assist you and your organization throughout the process of informing the media and the public after adverse event occurs.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    G-I-N PUBLIC is a working group of researchers, health professionals and consumers who promote ways to inform and involve the public in clinical guideline activity around the world. G-I-N PUBLIC uses a wiki website to post information about how patients and the public can be involved in guideline development. You can find information about projects in various countries, practical information such as handbooks on public involvement and lots of literature references.

    Professional Development
    International

    The Habits of a Systems Thinker describe ways of thinking about how systems work and how actions taken can impact results seen over time. They encompass a spectrum of thinking strategies that foster problem-solving and encourage questioning. Though “habit” is defined as a usual way of doing things, the Habits of a Systems Thinker do not suggest that systems thinkers are limited by routine ways of thinking. Rather, the Habits encourage flexible thinking and appreciation of new, emerging insights and multiple perspectives.

    Research Project
    Ontario

    The Internationally EducatedNurse (IEN) and English as a Second Language (ESL) Nurse Integration Project aimsto ensure RegisteredNurses(RNs) and Registered Practical Nurses (RPNs) educated abroad orin Canada are fully integrated into the nursing workforce. Its purpose is to create, implement and evaluate integration strategies. The project provides IEN/ESL nurses with various clinical and communication skills supports from pre hire through orientation and clinical integration, including clinical assessment and development, problemsolving,teamrelationships, professionalismandmanaging conflictin a hospital setting.

    Ontario

    The Internationally Educated Nurse (IEN) and English as a Second Language (ESL) Nurse Integration Project aims to ensure Registered Nurses (RNs) and Registered Practical Nurses 
    (RPNs) educated abroad or in Canada are fully integrated into the nursing workforce. Its purpose is to create, implement and evaluate integration strategies. The project provides 
    IEN/ESL nurses with various clinical and communication skills supports from pre hire through orientation and clinical integration, including clinical assessment and development, 
    problem solving, team relationships, professionalism and managing conflict in a hospital setting. 
     

    BC

    Our Mission: to create a comprehensive provincial program to improve and sustain hand hygiene culture with the goal of decreasing the transmission of healthcare-associated infections

    Patient Safety
    BC

    Some 220,000 people are afflicted with health care associated infections (HCAI) in Canada every year. Of those, 8,000 to 12,000 will die as a result of acquiring the infection. Now imagine being able to help those patients with something so simple as better hand hygiene.

    Hand hygiene is considered the most important and effective infection prevention measure in the spread of health care-associated infections. Despite this, compliance with hand hygiene protocols by health care providers continues to be unacceptably low.

    Proper hand hygiene could potentially reduce health care associated infection by up to 50%.

    Evidence-based practice
    Canada

    Want to learn more about hand hygiene and how you can improve hand hygiene in your organization?

    The Canadian Patient Safety Institute and Discovery Campus offer an online hand hygiene education module for healthcare workers and volunteers. Please allow yourself 15 minutes to complete the training session. You will receive a certificate of of completion at the end.
     

    BC

    Slideshow demonstrating correct hand washing procedure.

    Patient Safety
    International

    After a hospitalization, being discharged is a key step on the road to recovery. But that road can take a dangerous turn—namely, a serious problem with one or more medications. It’s a common problem that many people experience within a few weeks of leaving the hospital. Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital now report in the Annals of Internal Medicine that even the involvement of a pharmacist doesn’t help much to prevent medication errors.

    “Half the patients had medication errors when they went home, whether there was a pharmacist intervention or not,” says Dr. Jeffrey Schnipper, one of the authors of the study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, and the director of clinical research for Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s hospitalist service.
     

    HSR Resources & Funding
    Canada

    Evidence and perspectives for funding health care in Canada.

    Canada

    A central, reliable and impartial resource for literature, news and discussion regarding activity-based hospital funding policies in Canada and internationally.

    Hospitals represent the largest single component of health care expenditures in Canada. Now exceeding $50 billion per year, hospital spending generates significant financial pressures on provincial budgets. To respond to these funding pressures, provinces are re-examining the method by which Canadian hospitals are funded. Specifically, some provinces are evaluating the rules and policies used to distribute funds to hospitals to address where, when, and what type of care should be provided.

    Canada

    Health Care in Canada is CIHI’s annual flagship report on the health care system and the health of Canadians. Since 2000, it has been a resource that tables fundamental issues facing the health care system. Addressing questions surrounding patient safety, wait times, health care spending and analyses on how the system has adapted over time to meet changing needs has made Health Care in Canada a key source for the public and policy-makers alike.

    This year’s report provides perspective on changes in the health care system and on current thinking surrounding health care and outcomes of care. As with its predecessors, Health Care in Canada 2010 draws on both internal and external information and data and introduces international comparisons where appropriate.

    Healthcare interventions
    BC

    The Committee is currently seeking written submissions that identify potential strategies to maintain a sustainable health care system for British Columbians.

    Care delivery innovation
    Canada

    Making interprofessional primary care (IPC) teams the standard model for delivery of primary health care services across Canada could help improve patient outcomes while reining in costs. Canada's population is aging, prevalence of chronic conditions is growing and, in turn, demand for health care and health care costs are rising. IPC team care could save the health care system almost $3 billion in direct and indirect costs of diabetes and depression complications alone.

    BC

    Fall from slips and trips are the second leading cause of injury to B.C. healthcare workers. This study, funded through WorkSafeBC's Research Secretariat, is a detailed investigation of workplace falls over a 3-year period among healthcare workers in a large B.C. health region. The study looked at the incidence of falls in acute, residential, and community care by occupation, time of year, day of the week, time of day, and location of work, as well as contributing factors.

    Research Report
    Canada

    In Progress Report 2013: Health care renewal in Canada, the Health Council reports on the progress made by jurisdictions in five priority areas of the health accords:

    • access and wait times;
    • primary health care reform and electronic health records;
    • pharmaceuticals management;
    • disease prevention, health promotion and public health; and
    • Aboriginal health
    Canada

    The healthcare sector makes up roughly one-tenth of the economic activity of modern economies, and labour inputs make up a large share of its costs, relative to other industries. As a result, the measurement, tracking and improvement of labour productivity in this industry, referred to here as health human resources productivity (HHRP), should be of significant policy concern. In principle, HHRP should be defined in terms of the relationship between health outcomes achieved (health status protection or improvement for individuals or populations) and health human resource inputs (time, effort, skills and knowledge) required. However, the vast majority of HHRP literature defines HHRP as the ratio of procedural and service outputs over inputs measured in terms of numbers of personnel, or time.

    Statistical Resources
    Canada

    Health Indicators 2010, the 11th in a series of annual reports, presents the most recent health indicator data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) and Statistics Canada on a broad range of measures. As in the past, the report seeks to answer two important questions: “How
    healthy are Canadians?” and “How healthy is the Canadian health system?” Health regions and other stakeholders may use this information to identify areas where improvements are needed and to learn from jurisdictions with the best outcomes. Each indicator falls into one of the four  dimensions of the Health Indicator Framework listed below:
    • Health status—provides insight on the health of Canadians, including well-being, human function and selected health conditions.
    • Non-medical determinants of health—reflects factors outside of the health system that affect health.
    • Health system performance—provides insight on the quality of health services, including accessibility, appropriateness, effectiveness and patient safety.
    • Community and health system characteristics—provides useful contextual information, rather than direct measures of health status or quality of care.

    In addition to presenting the latest indicator data, this year’s report focuses on health disparities, the fifth dimension in the framework. Measuring and reporting health disparities are important because some of them may be reduced or prevented. Reducing health disparities could help to address the
    problem of excess mortality and morbidity, ease economic burden and boost the nation’s health profile as a whole.

    Statistical Resources
    Canada

    Health Indicators 2011 is the 12th in a series of annual reports containing the most recently available health indicators data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Statistics Canada. In addition to presenting the latest indicator data, this year's report features a focus section on mental health, including five new indicators that provide information about Canada's mental health system

    Network
    International

    A Social Network for Health Informatics Professionals and Students

    eHealth Resource
    International

    Much has changed in the world of health information technology since our inaugural report in 2006, Health Information Technology in the United States: The Information Base for Progress. At that time, there was a dearth of methodologically rigorous data on health information technology adoption, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology was relatively small with a limited budget and very few hospitals or physician offices had functional electronic health records. Over the last seven years, two major pieces of legislation have been passed, the Health Information Technology for Clinical and Economic Health provision of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the Affordable Care Act, which have provided unprecedented levels of financial support for health information technology adoption and implementation, primarily in the form of financial incentives for providers, and emphasized the importance of this technology in delivery system reform. We have seen the rate of electronic health record adoption among physicians and hospitals begin to increase more rapidly and the focus has begun to shift from simply turning on the technology to using it in a way that improves the quality and efficiency of care. 

    In this report we continue to track progress toward the goal of universal adoption of electronic health records. We track the progress of hospitals and physicians, both overall and among those providers serving vulnerable populations; examine the state of health information exchange and mirroring emphasis at the federal level of implementing and using these technologies in a way that improves patient care, and; we examine the use of these tools for population management and patient education. 

    International

    On HRSATube, you will find videos on primary health care, health IT, organ donation, HIV/AIDS, the National Health Service Corps and other topics related to access to health care.

    eHealth Online Course
    International

    This course consists of a brief introduction followed by three lessons. Within these lessons there are video clips, case studies, and knowledge check questions.

    International

    Ten years ago, there was a lack of recognition of health literacy as a foundational element for high-quality, patient-centered care. And there was no recognition of the importance of health literacy to improving population health. But in 2004, the Institute of Medicine released the report Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion. In that same year the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) published a systematic review and analysis of evidence about the relationship between literacy and health outcomes and the effectiveness of interventions to mitigate the impact of low health literacy.  Over the past decade, understanding has evolved to the point where we now understand that health literacy is not just a function of individual skills and abilities, it also includes the demands and complexities of the systems with which individuals interact. Health Literacy: Past, Present, and Future commemorates the 2004 release and features invited presentations and discussions of the progress made in the field of health literacy since that time, explores the current state of the field, and discusses possible directions for future health literacy efforts. 

    Healthcare interventions
    Ontario

    This information provides feedback to health care providers and health care leaders to support quality improvement in health care delivery.

    Statistical Resources
    Canada

    This report is the second in a series focused on health outcomes of care jointly produced by Statistics Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). In the first report, A Framework for Health Outcomes Analysis, we explored the feasibility of conducting health outcomes analyses using existing data, with a specific focus on diabetes and depression.2 The analysis was guided by the Health Outcomes Conceptual Framework, which places health outcomes within the context of the care path experienced by patients as well as important patient and health system factors hypothesized to be associated with health outcomes of care. Among the key highlights of this first report was the recognition that reporting and understanding health outcomes from a population perspective is important to better understand what care works best for whom. Results of the analytical work conducted in the areas of depression and diabetes clearly demonstrated that existing data sources are very limited in their ability to provide information regarding health outcomes of care. Despite best efforts to use existing survey, administrative and clinical registry data in the most extensive ways, clear data gaps continue to exist at the pan-Canadian level. Specifically, there is a lack of standard, comprehensive and repeated measures of health status at the population level as well as of comprehensive information regarding the full spectrum of health care services received that would follow an individual along the continuum of care received and resulting outcomes.

    HSR Resources & Funding
    International

    This Reader aims to provide a basis of understanding, ideas and experience to strengthen the quality of HPSR – including a collection of high quality papers that demonstrate the application of different HPSR strategies and methods.

    Edited by Lucy Gilson of the University of Cape Town and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, this publication provides guidance on the defining features of HPSR and the critical steps in conducting research in this field. It showcases the diverse range of research strategies and methods encompassed by HPSR.

    The target audience for the Reader includes researchers, teachers and students, as well as those working within health systems, and particularly those working in low-and middle-income countries.
     

    HSR Centre
    International

    The Health Services Research Association of Australia & New Zealand was incorporated in Sydney in April 2001. It has been set up in response to a growing need to promote health services research in both Australia and New Zealand.

    The purpose of the Association is to facilitate communication across researchers, and between researchers and policymakers, to promote education and training in health services research, and to ensure sustainable capacity in health services research in Australia and New Zealand.

    International

    The Digital Commons Network provides free access to full-text scholarly articles and other research from hundreds of universities and colleges worldwide. Curated by university librarians and their supporting institutions, this dynamic research tool includes peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, dissertations, working papers, conference proceedings, and other original scholarly work.

    Research Resources
    Ontario

    Health Systems Evidence is a continuously updated repository of syntheses of research evidence about governance, financial and delivery arrangements within health systems, and about implementation strategies that can support change in health systems. Over time Health Systems Evidence will also contain a continuously updated repository of economic evaluations in these same domains, descriptions of health system reforms, and descriptions of health systems.

    Research Resources
    Ontario

    Health Systems Evidence is a continuously updated repository of syntheses of research evidence about governance, financial and delivery arrangements within health systems, and about implementation strategies that can support change in health systems. Over time Health Systems Evidence will also contain a continuously updated repository of economic evaluations in these same domains, descriptions of health system reforms, and descriptions of health systems.

    Program Evaluation
    Canada

    Health Systems Evidence is a continuously updated repository of syntheses of research evidence about governance, financial and delivery arrangements within health systems, and about implementation strategies that can support change in health systems. Health Systems Evidence also contains a continuously updated repository of economic evaluations in these same domains, descriptions of health system reforms, and descriptions of health systems, as well as a variety of types of complementary content (e.g. World Health Organization documents about health systems).

    Research Resources
    Ontario

    Health Systems Evidence is an easy-to-search and continuously updated online repository of research evidence about governance, financial and delivery arrangements within health systems, and about implementation strategies that can support change in health systems. Health Systems 

    Evidence-based practice
    Ontario

    The world's most comprehensive, free access point for evidence to support policymakers, stakeholders and researchers interested in how to strengthen or reform health systems or in how to get cost-effective programs, services and drugs to those who need them

    Health Systems Evidence is a continuously updated repository of syntheses of research evidence about governance, financial and delivery arrangements within health systems, and about implementation strategies that can support change in health systems. Over time Health Systems Evidence will also contain a continuously updated repository of economic evaluations in these same domains, descriptions of health system reforms, and descriptions of health systems.
     

    Research Report
    International

    The Health Systems in Transition (HiT) series consists of country-based reviews that provide a detailed description of a health system and of reform and policy initiatives in progress or under development in a specific country. Each review is produced by country experts in collaboration with the Observatory’s staff. In order to facilitate comparisons between countries, reviews are based on a template, which is revised periodically. The template provides detailed guidelines and specific questions, definitions and
    examples needed to compile a report.

    Network
    International

    The aim of this website is to share expertise and experience on health care systems with policy makers, managers of health services, health care providers and health system researchers. The website is a product of a network of partners on health systems, which individual members can be found at the bottom of this page. The network is funded by the Belgian government (Directorate-General for Development Co-operation).

    Knowledge Translation
    Alberta

    The foundation for any health technology assessment (HTA) is information. In fact, health technology assessment is the synthesis of many pieces of information from many different sources. The purpose of an HTA is to provide health care decision-makers with the evidence they need to make informed decisions concerning the introduction, allocation and cost-effective use of medical technologies.

    Since its beginnings in the United States in the early 1970s, health technology assessment has expanded throughout the world. This growth has been accompanied by the development of many useful sources for HTA information. Some of these sources are produced by government and HTA agencies, while others are the products of centres involved in advancing evidence-based health care, such as the international Cochrane Collaboration.

    The amount of information on Internet is of course overwhelming and there is the additional problem that information can be biased, out-of-date or low-quality. The key to efficient searching is to know where reliable and relevant information can most often be found.

    This guide focuses on Internet sites, particularly those that may be useful for people involved in health care in Alberta, Canada, but health technology assessments will also incorporate data from other sources. These may include specialized bibliographic databases relevant to the subject of the assessment; data from government and regulatory agencies; administrative databases; industry studies, and advice from experts in the field. Traditional print resources, such as medical textbooks, may also provide background information. These sources will vary depending on the subject and scope of the assessment. People outside of Canada may wish to add sites (i.e. government, regulatory agencies, etc.) specific to their geographic context.

    Healthcare interventions
    BC

    Improve your health in a mobile minute – view a series of video clips where selected health and wellness apps are reviewed by Dr. Kendall Ho, Director of the eHealth Strategy Office

    Canada

    How this site will save you time

    • Public health content filtered for you from the literature and stored in a searchable registry
    • Content that has been quality rated
    • Design informed by public health decision makers across Canada
    • For each review with an accompanying summary statement, evidence and implications, clearly spelled out in 2 pages
    • Building networks with colleagues in your program area

    This site will save you time by addressing two major barriers identified by public health and health promotion decision makers: 1) identifying public health/health promotion literature in large medical databases such as MEDLINE, and 2) accessing well-done reviews synthesizing the literature evaluating the effectiveness of numerous public health and health promotion interventions.

    Canada

    Canada's prized Medicare system is facing serious challenges on two key fronts: in meeting the legitimate health care needs of Canadians and in being affordable for the public purse. The founding
    principles of Medicare are not being met today either in letter or in spirit. Canadians are not receiving the value they deserve from the health care system. In both 2008 and 2009, the Euro-Canada Health Consumer Index ranked Canada 30th of 30 countries (the U.S. was not included in the sample) in terms of value for money spent on health care. Canadians deserve better.

    Canada cannot continue on this path. The system needs to be massively transformed, a task that
    demands political courage and leadership, flexibility from within the health care professions and farsightedness on the part of the public. It is a lot to demand, but nothing less than one of Canada’s
    most cherished national institutions is at stake. Unwillingness to confront the challenges is not an
    option.

    Research Project
    Canada

    The latest research from PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute (HRI), HealthCast provides rich insight from 3,500 consumers around the world, including 500 Canadians, as well as 590 global health leaders (50 in Canada). In-depth interviews were conducted with 225 top executives in government, hospital systems, insurance companies, physician groups,
    pharmaceutical and life science companies and technology firms in 50 countries, including 35 Canadian experts.

    This Canadian Compendium is designed to complement the HRI global report by providing a summary of key highlights from the Canadian perspective. What are the healthcare concerns of Canadian consumers, the true end users of the healthcare system? What are healthcare leaders saying about moving Canada towards an innovative system of customized care and prevention?
    What does healthcare look like now and how will things change through to 2020? This Compendium offers a robust overview of the challenges, strengths and opportunities of healthcare in Canada.
     

    Ontario

    McGill University’s Institute for Health and Social Policy (IHSP) operates the Healthier Societies Initiative (HSI), a research program whose mission is to inform the broader community on health care issues related to increasing costs, quality and access in Canada and other leading economies.

    Understanding what engenders a “healthy” society requires in-depth knowledge of the interactions between health and social policies, health system characteristics, health expenditures, and socioeconomic determinants of health, among other factors.

    The mission of the Healthier Societies Initiative (HSI) is to identify health and social policy solutions that address rising health care costs and concomitantly improve population health outcomes and equity.

    eHealth Resource
    International

    About Healthline BodyMaps
    BodyMaps is an interactive visual search tool that allows users to explore the human body in 3-D. With easy-to-use navigation, users can search multiple layers of the human anatomy, view systems and organs down to their smallest parts, and understand in detail how the human body works.

    Using detailed 3-D models of body parts-including muscles, veins, bones, and organs-Body Maps offers a new way to visualize and manage your health. See how the coronary artery delivers blood to the heart, and learn how plaque build-up on artery walls leads to heart disease. Locate the exact location of a pulled muscle or broken bone, and find information on how to prevent injuries. View a cross-section of the human brain, and learn which areas control certain emotions and body functions.

    By offering rich, detailed anatomical images alongside links to relevant and useful health information, BodyMaps allows you to leam about your body and your health in a personalized and revolutionary new way.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Search to find health workforce initiatives that are being implemented across Australia to build capacity, boost productivity and improve the distribution of health professionals

    Ontario

    In 2005, RNAO, with funding from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care, launched a four year research project aimed at evaluating the implementation and uptake of its six foundational Healthy Work Environments Best Practice Guidelines (HWE BPG) in nine healthcare settings in Ontario. This report is the summary of findings stemming from that pilot evaluation. The six foundational HWE BPG implemented were: Collaborative Practice Among Nursing Teams; Developing and Sustaining Effective Staffing and Workload Practices; Professionalism in Nursing; Developing and Sustaining Nursing Leadership; Embracing Cultural Diversity in Health Care: Developing Cultural Competence; Professionalism in Nursing; and Workplace Health, Safety and Well-being of the Nurse.

    The objectives of the evaluation were to: (1) determine the presence or extent of HWE BPG recommendations in action before and after guideline implementation in nursing practice and in nursing work settings; (2) document strategies and processes used to implement the different HWE BPGs across an array of nursing work settings; and (3) assess nurse perceptions of organizational factors and levels of worth, usefulness and effectiveness contributing to the uptake of the HWE BPGs implemented in nursing work settings.

    Canada

    The National Standard of Canada on Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace (Standard) was developed jointly by the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and the Bureau de normalisation du Québec (BNQ) using a recognized consensus process for standard development. Psychological health is defined in the Standard as synonymous with mental health - a state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community.
    Psychological health differs from psychological safety. Psychological safety is important too, as it concerns the environmental risks and hazards in the workplace that can influence the individual’s mental health and wellbeing. Psychological safety is defined in the Standard as absence of harm and/or threat of harm to mental well-being that a worker might experience.

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    Today, it’s not enough for scientists to be experts in research and research methods. It is becoming
    more and more apparent that scientists need to be entrepreneurs, with skills in finance, business, and even communications to be successful.

    If you are not able to communicate your research and the results of your work effectively, it will be impossible to expect others to understand and apply your research. As a matter of fact, more and
    more scientific journals are recognizing the importance of appropriate communication, requiring that articles submitted must be edited into a more readable, understandable format: ‘‘The writing has
    become more and more technical and only a few scientists in a particular niche can understand any given article,’’ cites the Ottawa Citizen in December 2007.  Moreover, the journal Science now
    requires articles to be submitted in plain language: ‘‘Cross-fertilization of ideas from one field to another is a huge source of new ideas, and this process ends up being cut off if people can’t understand each other’s work.’’

    Education Module
    International

    During my spring 2012 internship, I took on a variety of projects at NN/LM PSR. One of these projects included making modifications to the existing Helping Older Adults Search for Health Information Online: A Toolkit for Trainers to create a toolkit targeting adults, especially those with low literacy skills. Medical information is often dense, complex, and filled with jargon. Readers of all literacy levels benefit from straightforward, plain language and easy-to-read health information. But this course will be focused mostly on helping individuals with below basic and basic literacy levels seek out health information online. The ultimate goal of the course is to help individuals to locate accurate and authoritative health information which will lead them to make better decisions regarding their own health, resulting in changes in behavior and their whole well-being.

    Research Resources
    International

    This website brings together people from across industries who have an interest in matters pertaining to high reliability organizations (defined as "organizations which have fewer than normal accidents"). The site features articles, examples of high reliability organizations, a Risk Mitigation Model, as well as archives from their annual conference.

    HSR Resources & Funding
    Canada

    Strong interest has emerged in high-cost, high-user patients–a minority of the total patient population that accounts for a large proportion of total health spending. The notion has emerged that health systems can realize significant benefits by doing a better job of managing the care of this relatively small group, especially through improving the coordination of clinical and social care.

    Care delivery innovation
    International

    Within the US and around the world, hospital executives are facing increasing pressure to reduce
    operating costs and improve quality of care. Hospitals that fare best will be those that become
    efficient operators and reduce waste in their clinical care. Efforts are underway in many places to reduce waste, improve efficiency, and maintain quality. In December 2009, the Health Foundation in the United Kingdom commissioned the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) to design and test a tool for identifying clinical waste within the hospital inpatient setting. Through review of existing literature, conversations with experts, and direct input from hospitals engaged in testing, IHI developed the Hospital Inpatient Waste Identification Tool. The Waste Identification Tool was designed to identify clinical and operational waste from the perspective of frontline clinical staff, with the aim of informing strategic decision making for the hospital.

    The Hospital Inpatient Waste Identification Tool was developed through two cycles of research and development at IHI. In the first cycle, eight hospitals (six from the UK and two from the US) conducted rapid-cycle testing of the Waste Identification Tool and engaged in one-on-one conference calls with IHI faculty to debrief those tests. The Waste Identification Tool consists of five modules — Ward Module, Patient Care Module, Diagnosis Module, Treatment Module, and Patient Module — that qualitatively identify opportunities for waste reduction. The tool is designed to provide a snapshot
    of potential areas of waste within a hospital, as identified by frontline clinical staff. Once this snapshot is obtained, representatives of the hospital’s frontline clinical staff, finance department, and leadership engage in a process of enriched review and analysis of Waste Identification Tool findings to prioritize waste reduction initiatives that will result in cost savings for the organization.

    This white paper describes the Hospital Inpatient Waste Identification Tool, instructs users in how to make best use of it, and offers methods for using Waste Identification Tool findings to inform strategic decisions that will remove waste.

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    “In Canada in health care we’re at a point where most hospitals accept the role of social media for branding and communication, but only the lead adopters are using it for patient engagement and for clinical use.” – Ann Fuller, public relations director, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO)

    Call up the website home page for any large Canadian hospital and you’ll likely spot the familiar icons that link to the institution’s facebook, Twitter and YouTube accounts.

    Hospitals are inherently conservative institutions and, as such, have been relative latecomers to adopt social media, which are broadly defined as digital channels that can facilitate timely, collaborative and interactive communication.

    As they enter the social media fray, hospitals face a host of challenges and decisions. These range from basic upkeep—nothing is more frustrating to a potential user than a neglected or stale-dated facebook or Twitter account—to deciding how interactive to be with patients, and what staff should be trained and involved in social media use.

    Care delivery innovation
    International

    Hospitals in Pursuit of Excellence is the American Hospital Association's strategic platform to accelerate performance improvement and support delivery system transformation in the nation's hospitals and health systems.

    HPOE provides:

    • Education on best practices through multiple channels,
    • Develops evidence-based tools and guides,
    • Provides leadership development through fellowships and networks, and
    • Engages hospitals in national improvement projects.

    Working in collaboration with allied hospital associations and national partners, HPOE synthesizes and disseminates knowledge, shares proven practices, and spreads innovation to support care improvement at the local level.
     

    Saskatchewan

    The Saskatchewan RN Association's discussion paper. In today’s work environments, RNs are frequently faced with increased requests and requirements to work extra shifts and overtime. Fatigue has been identified as a contributing factor to medical errors which can impact patient safety. The  purpose of this discussion paper is to present the research and literature related to fatigue and to make recommendations. The responsibilities of RNs, RN managers/employers, educators and researchers are outlined.

    International

    Slide presentation regarding citing activity on Twitter among scholars.

    Care delivery innovation
    International

    Social media is a broad term that can include many types of “media.” Broadly speaking,
    media may be defined as “tools used to store and deliver information or data,” and social media
    is “media disseminated through social interaction.”1 So social media is more than just Twitter
    or Facebook posts, it includes all sorts of sociallyinteractive information exchange. Kaplan and
    Haenlein described 6 types of social media (seeTable 1).2 A similar social media organizational
    structure is used on the HowTo.gov site (http://www.howto.gov/social-media), a US government
    Web site best described as a resource to help government workers deliver a better customer experience to citizens (see Table 2 for a glossary of social media terms3).

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Evidence is mounting that publication in a peer-reviewed medical journal does not guarantee a study’s validity (1). Many studies of health care effectiveness do not show the cause-and-effect relationships that they claim. They have faulty research designs. Mistaken conclusions later reported in the news media can lead to wrong-headed policies and confusion among policy makers, scientists, and the public. Unfortunately, little guidance exists to help distinguish good study designs from bad ones, the central goal of this article.

    There have been major reversals of study findings in recent years. Consider the risks and benefits of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT). In the 1950s, epidemiological studies suggested higher doses of HRT might cause harm, particularly cancer of the uterus (2). In subsequent decades, new studies emphasized the many possible benefits of HRT, particularly its protective effects on heart disease — the leading killer of North American women. The uncritical publicity surrounding these studies was so persuasive that by the 1990s, about half the postmenopausal women in the United States were taking HRT, and physicians were chastised for under-prescribing it. Yet in 2003, the largest randomized controlled trial (RCT) of HRT among postmenopausal women found small increases in breast cancer and increased risks of heart attacks and strokes, largely offsetting any benefits such as fracture reduction (3).

    Research Project
    International

    Objectives:  Assess if patients can improve their medical records’ accuracy if effectively engaged using a networked Personal Health Record; (2) workflow efficiency and reliability for receiving and processing patient feedback; and (3) patient feedback’s impact on medical record accuracy.

    Care delivery innovation
    Canada

    We work with your stories to identify key areas for change in the healthcare system from the patient perspective. To learn more about how your stories can lead to change

    International

    The job of a leader has become more difficult and dangerous than ever courtesy of anti-bullying laws. State governments have been caving in to public pressure to pass tough anti-bullying laws to make the workplace safer for employees. However, they are a Catch-22: the harder you try to comply with them, the worse the bullying gets

    International

    Policy issue and context: poor work environments compromise healthworkforce
    supply and quality of care 

    • Health policy-makers face the challenge of matching increasing demand for
    • health care with a sufficient supply of health professionals in times of existing and projected health-workforce shortages.

    • The work environment constitutes an important factor in the recruitment and
    • retention of health professionals, and the characteristics of the work environment affect the quality of care both directly and indirectly.  Addressing the work environment, therefore, plays a critical role in ensuring both the supply of a health workforce and the enhancement, effectiveness and motivation of that workforce.

    • The purpose of providing attractive and supportive work environments is to
    • create incentives for entering – and remaining in – the health professions, and to provide conditions that enable health workers to perform effectively (to achieve high-quality health services).

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Key Points

    • Any Web site should make it easy for you to learn who is responsible for the site and its information (see Question 1).
    • If the person or organization in charge of the Web site did not write the material, the Web site should clearly identify the original source of the information (see Question 4).
    • Health-related Web sites should give information about the medical credentials of the people who have prepared or reviewed the material on the site (see Question 6).
    • Any Web site that asks you for personal information should explain exactly what the site will and will not do with that information (see Question 9).
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Federal Trade Commission are federal government agencies that help protect consumers from false or misleading health claims on the Internet (see Question 12).
    Education Module
    International

    So you’ve decided to take the plunge (or at least, dip your toes) into the Twitterverse. Congratulations! Welcome to a vibrant interactive community. You’ll find plenty of different personalities here and lots of opinions. But if you are like I was back in January 2011, you currently have no idea how to actually use Twitter, let alone how a physician might want to use it.

    There are plenty of places to find information about how to start a Twitter account, so I am going to take a leap of faith and say that if you are reading this, you have already set one up. If not, check out some online resources regarding starting your account and come back to this blog so you can figure out what you might want to do after the basic infrastructure is lay down (or, if you are just relatively adventurous, just head to Twitter and start your account without listening to any of the “pundits”). This post is not meant to give you the ins-and-outs about Twitter. I think they do a pretty good job explaining the basics on their help center. There, you’ll find the “how’s” of Twitter, like how to post a tweet or how to follow others.

    Patient Safety
    International

    As Angela McNab highlighted, mental health services continue to suffer institutional disadvantage when compared to physical health. Similarly, despite a recent spike in interest, mental health does not enjoy comparable column inches and, where it does, it is typically for all the wrong reasons. Although there have been recent advances in awareness at the national level – including parity with physical health in NHS England's mandate and health minister Norman Lamb's efforts to raise its profile – there is still work to be done to engage with the public and improve patient care in mental health.

    In the wake of the Mid Staffs scandal, patient engagement has been high on the agenda, the argument being, had we listened to patients' concerns, we would have spotted the negligence before it became endemic. While this is undoubtedly true, the patient voice can be much more than a safety barometer. At South London and Maudsley foundation trust (Slam), we provide the widest range of NHS mental health and substance misuse services in the UK, and believe that everyone who uses our services has a valuable contribution to make to service development and training.

    Research Resources
    International

    Keeping up to date with research and managing an ever-increasing number of journal articles is skill that must be well-honed by academics. Here, Alex Hope sets out how his workflow has developed using Zotero, Dropbox, Goodreader and his iPad.

    I use a variety of methods to keep on top of research in my field, and to search for articles when preparing a paper or presentation. Foremost is the use of RSS feeds to deliver alerts of new articles in journals I follow. I use Google Reader to manage my feeds and usually browse through new feed articles using Flipboard on my iPad or iPhone. If I come across an interesting article that I think I may like to read and use, I email myself the link. This means that when I check my email every morning, I can navigate to the article and save it in my reference manager for reading and marking up. If I am researching a paper, I tend to search journal repositories such as Web of Knowledge, although more often than not I find Google Scholar finds what I need quickly and accurately. Finally I am finding that Twitter is a fantastic resource for uncovering new research as an increasing number of researchers and research groups have a presence.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    The panel discussion was invented by someone who liked to sit three feet above his audience, talk with five of his closest friends for an hour, and barely acknowledge that there are 100 other people in the room, usually sitting in uncomfortable chairs.

    But until the panel discussion disappears from the agendas of conferences and networking events, you may be asked to moderate one. Lucky for you, the bar is very, very low. If you can find a way to deliver a few fleeting moments of entertainment or interaction, you will be regarded as a rock star. If you can toss in some insight and controversy, they may erect a statue of you at the convention center.

    I've moderated more than 300 panel discussions at events like the Consumer Electronics Show, the Sundance Film Festival, and various Harvard Business School conferences. Here are a dozen guidelines to put you on the right track when you're tapped to run a panel.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    The panel discussion was invented by someone who liked to sit three feet above his audience, talk with five of his closest friends for an hour, and barely acknowledge that there are 100 other people in the room, usually sitting in uncomfortable chairs.

    But until the panel discussion disappears from the agendas of conferences and networking events, you may be asked to moderate one. Lucky for you, the bar is very, very low. If you can find a way to deliver a few fleeting moments of entertainment or interaction, you will be regarded as a rock star. If you can toss in some insight and controversy, they may erect a statue of you at the convention center.

    I've moderated more than 300 panel discussions at events like the Consumer Electronics Show, the Sundance Film Festival, and various Harvard Business School conferences. Here are a dozen guidelines to put you on the right track when you're tapped to run a panel.

    International

    Home healthcare workers can be vulnerable as they face an unprotected and unpredictable environment each time they enter a client's community and home. The spectrum of violence ranges from verbal abuse, to stalking or threats of assault, to homicide.

    Verbal abuse from the client, family members, or people in the community is a form of workplace violence. Verbal abuse may be subtle, such as asking for help beyond the scope of the job (such as with cleaning), or it may be obvious, such as complaining about job performance or worker appearance—or even threatening to cause harm.
     

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    The Knowledge Translation Planning Template-R™ grew out of a need for systematic thinking about the different key elements of a thorough knowledge translation (KT) plan. In 2008, Dr. Barwick was becoming involved in several projects, and needed a way to develop a KT plan for projects in which she was not the content expert. At the same time, funders were beginning to require greater detail about KT activities as a component of grant applications. These needs were met through the development of the KT Planning Template-R™, which was designed to facilitate reflection and consideration of the key
    parts of a KT plan in any research field.
     

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    The development of the Search Pyramid was spawned by the notion that, while public health practitioners are aware of many resources that contain research, using those resources to find the highest quality evidence in the little time available still remains a challenge. In short, the Search Pyramid was designed to answer the question “How will public health practitioners know what research is reliable, and what is worth using?” As such, the Search Pyramid represents a faster, more efficient
    way to find high quality research evidence.
     

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Case reports are important. Although much maligned over the last decade or so, case reports are now more widely recognised for their significant potential benefits: brilliant vehicles for delivering concise clinical-guidance messages to promote best practice; excellent teaching aids in case-based learning; the foundation for subsequent larger research programs; and a very useful training in the art of how to publish pretty-much anything at all.

    However these benefits rely on two key challenges; being able to write the report in a clear and engaging way, and then being able to persuade someone else to publish it. I’ll write a few notes below on my views on report-writing, and then in the next blog in this series I’ll touch on publishing tips and strategies.  

    Care delivery innovation
    International

    Patients are most at risk for experiencing gaps in care that lead to rehospitalization during the transition between care settings. The focus of this guide is the transition of residents from the hospital to the skilled nursing facility (SNF) setting and the associated transfer of responsibility from the hospital to the SNF care team. (SNF is an umbrella term that includes nursing homes, long-term care facilities, acute rehabilitation facilities, and post-acute care facilities.)

    Based on a synthesis of the literature, interviews with experts, direct observations in SNFs, and workgroups with clinicians at field sites, this How-to Guide highlights four promising changes for an ideal transition and several other changes that merit further testing. Key tools and resources to help organizations implement these changes are also included.
     

    Canada

    Links to a series of reports, including:

    • Nurse Human Resource Requirements in Canada: Implications of Changes in Service Delivery
    • Nursing Education in Canada: Historical Review and Current Capacity
    • Canadian Survey of Nurses from Three Occupational Groups
    • Mobility of Nurses in Canada
    • Immigration and Emigration Trends: A Canadian Perspective
    • Technological Change
    • The Nursing Union Activist Focus Group Report
    • Simulation Analysis Report
    • Review of Concurrent Research on Nursing Labour Market Topics
    • The International Nursing Labour Market
    Patient Safety
    International
    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are often used for patients needing central venous (CV) access, both in the hospital and out. Clinicians greatly prefer them over femoral catheters and internal jugular catheters to provide CV access for appropriate patients. Why? PICC lines use blood vessels farther away from the large arteries found near the femoral and internal jugular region.
     
    Because you're likely to encounter more and more PICC lines no matter where you work, you need to understand them and their indications and contraindications (see Guide to PICC lines). You also need to know how to assess, maintain, and manage PICC lines to ensure they're functioning effectively. For all the details, read on.
     
    Evidence-based practice
    International

    The future sustainability of health systems will depend on how well governments are able to anticipate and respond to efficiency and quality of care challenges. Bold action is required, as well as willingness to test innovative care delivery approaches.

    The greatest promise for transformational change is in applications that encourage new, ubiquitous, participatory preventive and personalised smart models of care. A whole new world of possibilities in using mobiles and the Internet to address healthcare challenges has opened up. The potential of mobile devices, services and applications to support self-management, behavioural modification and "participatory healthcare" is greater than ever before.

    A key hurdle is, however, the big data challenge, dealing with the exponentially accelerating accumulation of patient data – all of which must be mined, stored securely and accurately, and converted to meaningful information at the point of care. In order to fully exploit the new smart approaches to care, acceptance, privacy and usability issues will also have to be carefully considered.

    eHealth Resources
    International

    The IHI Improvement Map is an open resource, available free of charge for anyone, anywhere who share's IHI's mission of improving health care.

    We have created this user-friendly, online tool to make the contents of the Improvement Map easily accessible.

    You can use this tool to create your overall improvement plan, set and align priorities, and then dive deeply into the knowledge base in areas in which you've chosen to focus.

    Conference Presentations
    BC

    Sponsored by the BC Patient Safety & Quality Council, provincial access to all keynote speakers and special interest keynote speaker presentations from IHI's 22nd Annual National Forum will be available starting December 13, 2010. These videos will be available on IHI TV for the next 5 years through IHI's website. The video format, similar to YouTube, is best watched from an individual workstation as the image may be grainy when blown up for group viewing.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    In this new feature, the IHI Open School will highlight some of the most innovate Chapters in its network. We will feature information on the Chapter, and focus on a new innovation or project they’ve developed.

    We’re looking for other Chapters to feature. Has your Chapter held a successful event or created a Chapter resource that you think we should highlight in the Chapter Spotlight? Send us an email at openschool@ihi.org and tell us what innovative projects your Chapter has done recently.

    Professional Development
    International

    The IHI Open School currently offers a range of online courses in the areas of quality improvement, patient safety, patient- and family-centered care, managing health care operations, and leadership. Each course takes roughly an hour to two hours to complete and consists of several lessons taking 15-30 minutes each.

    You’ll take a quiz at the end of each lesson. To pass, you need to answer at least 75% of the questions correctly.

    The IHI Open School’s online courses are available to non-student professionals on a subscription-only basis. (Scholarships may be available based on need.) We offer the courses free of charge to students, university faculty who are teaching courses, medical residents, and users from the Least Developed Countries. All other IHI Open School resources, including the Chapter Network, are free for all

    Education Module
    BC

    BCCDC offers a variety of online immunization-related courses available at www.bccdclearning.ca

    These courses are designed to help improve an immunizer’s knowledge, skill and confidence with respect to immunization delivery in British Columbia.

    Please consult your health professional’s regulatory body as well as your employer who can advise you of respective requirements in order to safely administer immunizations.

    Knowledge Translation
    Ontario

    Policy development is a complex process and there are many reasons why even the best arguments backed by solid research can fail to be heard or to be acted on. Decision makers are barraged with conflicting demands, often supported by contradictory evidence, making it difficult for independent researchers to even be heard. Low levels of public understanding of and interest in policy issues, lack of political will, bureaucratic inertia, and counter arguments promoted by interests with their own agendas in mind further complicate the scenario.

    Even when the importance of independent public-interest research in supporting policy development is widely-accepted and when the research is designed to help resolve the recognised problems of policymakers and advocacy groups, it faces significant challenges to being effectively introduced into policy debates.
     

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Comparative Effectiveness

    The mission of the comparative effectiveness portfolio is to provide health care decision makers—including patients, clinicians, purchasers, and policymakers—with up-to-date, evidence-based information about their treatment options to make informed health care decisions
     

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    One of the greatest challenges facing the global health community is how to take proven
    interventions and implement them in the real world. Research on health systems, such as
    implementation research, is crucial to meeting that challenge, providing a basis for the
    context-specific, evidence-informed decision-making needed to make what is possible in
    theory a reality in practice.
    The World Health Organization (WHO) has long played a leading role in promoting health
    policy and systems research (HPSR)—including implementation research, with notable recent initiatives including the 2011 report: Implementation Research for the Control of Infectious Diseases of Poverty and the 2012 publication of its first strategy on HPSR called ‘Changing Mindsets’, which advocated for greater embedding of research into decisionmaking and called for more demand-driven research. With this Guide, WHO continues its support for this area, offering an introduction to the often challenging field of implementation research.

    Because implementation research is a relatively new and somewhat neglected field, there is a need to bring it into sharper focus, defining exactly what it is and what it can offer.  As such, this Guide presents an introduction to basic concepts used in implementation research and describes the range of approaches and applications that it can be used for. The main aim of the Guide is to support the development of and demand for implementation research that is problem-focused, action-oriented and above all aligned with health system needs.  

    Care delivery innovation
    International

    There is a consensus that the U.S. primary care system can be strengthened in fundamental ways to improve health care quality, safety, and patient experience and lower costs.

    A growing body of evidence supports the concept of practice facilitation as an effective strategy to improve primary health care processes and outcomes, including the delivery of wellness and preventive services, through the creation of an ongoing, trusting relationship between an external facilitator and a primary care practice. Practice facilitation activities may focus in particular on helping primary care practices become medical homes, but they can also help practices in more general quality improvement and redesign efforts.

    Healthcare interventions
    Ontario

    This brief was produced by the McMaster Health Forum to serve as the basis for discussions by a citizen panel about improving care and support for unpaid caregivers in Ontario. This brief includes information on this topic, including what is known about:

    • the underlying problem;
    • three possible options to address the problem; and
    • potential barriers and facilitators to implementing these options. 
    Saskatchewan

    A healthier working environment is linked to a healthier workforce. Nurses who rate their
    facilities as positive environments have fewer absences due to illness, lower rates of
    musculoskeletal pain, and better self-rated health.1 Research shows that organizational and
    managerial support lessen nurse dissatisfaction and burnout.2 As well, a positive link has
    been identified between nurses’ job satisfaction and patient outcomes. A study conducted in
    Ontario teaching hospitals showed that patient satisfaction with nursing care was directly
    related to how satisfied nurses were with their jobs.

    International

    RN Work Project Study reveals that physical environment, workgroup cohesion play significant roles in nurses' ratings of quality of patient care.

    There has been a great deal of research into the impact of nurse staffing on patient care, but we know that increasing nurse-to-patient ratios isn’t always possible,” said Maja Djukic, PhD, RN. The projected nursing shortage and the grim economic climate are making it more difficult for hospitals and health care systems to increase nurse staffing. That reality led the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) RN Work Project researchers to investigate whether there are other factors in the work environment that RNs perceive as affecting the quality of patient care. The RN Work Project is a nationwide, 10-year longitudinal survey of RNs begun in 2006.

    “What we found in our study is that hospital administrators can improve a variety of work environment factors that are also likely to improve the quality of patient care, without having to change nurse-to-patient ratios. Improvements need to be strategic, because our work shows that the value of enhancing work environment varies across different factors,” Djukic said.
     

    Care delivery innovation
    International

    Detecting and promptly reporting changes in a nursing home resident's condition are critical for ensuring the resident's well-being and safety. Such changes may represent a patient safety problem, and they can be a signal that the resident is at increased risk for falling and other complications.

    Training nursing home staff—particularly nursing staff—to be on the lookout for changes in a nursing home resident's condition and to effectively communicate those changes is one tool nursing home administrators can employ to improve patient safety, create a more resident-centered environment, and reduce the number of falls and fall-related injuries.
     

    Care delivery innovation
    Canada

    Using five case studies, the report demonstrates how process management techniques, which have been used successfully in other sectors, can improve health care outcomes and reduce costs in Canada.

    Document Highlights

    Health care continues to use an increasing portion of resources in order to provide the level of care that citizens expect. There is currently a great imperative to reduce the cost of health care in Canada.
    This report demonstrates how hospitals can improve their processes—and ultimately their bottom line—in order to enhance patient outcomes and the patient experience, all while reducing costs. By using process management techniques such as Lean and Six Sigma, which have been used very successfully in the manufacturing, finance, services, and health care sectors, hospitals can deliver better value for money.

    Using five case studies, the report illustrates how several hospitals in Canada and the United States have improved their processes in order to provide more effective health care and reduce costs.

    Patient Safety
    International

    Patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses are less likely to experience unnecessary physical and emotional suffering if they receive palliative or hospice care that meets 10 key quality indicators.

    Palliative care aims to improve quality of life for patients who are being treated for a serious illness by managing pain and other symptoms. Hospice is a specific type of palliative care for patients in their last year of life.

    “We identified the best available set of measures to help us evaluate whether we are delivering the very highest quality care to patients who have palliative care needs and their families,” says Sally Norton, associate professor in nursing and palliative care at the University of Rochester.

    Care delivery innovation
    International

    An increasing number of health care systems and providers offer services and tools that encourage and empower patients to take an active role in their own health care. The ability to access medical records, test results, and other health information online can increase patient involvement and facilitate patient—provider communication.
     

    Program Evaluation
    BC

    This fact sheet reviews different types of program evaluation activities and discusses Indigenous approaches and ethical guidelines for engaging in a program evaluation. 

    Education Module
    Canada

    Indigenous peoples in Canada face unique health challenges. There are many factors that play a role in their health including genetic factors, geographic factors, and a unique history that continues to play a strong role. Some of these factors are shared by other people in Canada but many are unique to indigenous peoples.

    Children account for roughly 50% of the indigenous population in Canada and there is very little direct teaching on the health of indigenous children in most health care professions. The goal of this course is to give a basic overview of the important aspects of the health of Indigenous children and youth in Canada. It is intended for medical students, residents, family physicians, pediatricians, or any other health care provider who cares for indigenous children

    Education Module
    BC

    This website includes information about the Indigenous Cultural Competency (ICC) Online Training Program delivered by the Provincial Health Services Authority of British Columbia.

    Core ICC Training is designed to increase Aboriginal-specific knowledge, enhance individual self awareness and strengthen skills for any professional working directly or indirectly with Indigenous people. This training would be of particular interest to those working in organizations such as justice, policing, child and family services, education, business and government.

    Core ICC Health Training was designed for Health Authority, Ministry of Health, and other professionals working in the health care field. It includes the foundation provided in Core ICC with an additional two modules that focus on health care issues for those working with Indigenous people in British Columbia.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    The audit tools and checklists below are intended to promote CDC-recommended practices for infection prevention in hemodialysis facilities. The audit tools and checklists can be used by individuals when assessing staff practices. They can also be used by facility staff themselves to help guide their practices.

    Patient Safety
    International

    Each year, 5% to 20% of the U.S. population is infected with the influenza virus. The influenza season occurs annually between the months of October and May, with 3,000 to 49,000 influenza-related deaths each year. Since complications delay recuperation, those in high-risk groups need to be monitored carefully. High-risk groups are more vulnerable to severe illness and complications of the disease and include: people older than 65 years of age, children under 2 years of age, pregnant women, obese patients, and patients with other serious comorbid conditions. This article provides home healthcare clinicians with important information on influenza, how it is transmitted, influenza virus types and changes in the virus, signs and symptoms of complications, and measures to prevent the occurrence and transmission of influenza. 

    Canada

    IWH study finds people who work shifts no more likely to leave job, despite poorer health two years after injury

    Research evidence has been accumulating on the adverse health consequences of night, evening and rotating shift work. Now new research is suggesting that, not only are shift workers at greater risk of work injury, they are more likely to have a harder time recovering should an injury occur.

    A study by at the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) compared the health outcomes of injured workers in standard day shifts with those of injured workers in non-standard shifts. The study by Dr. Imelda Wong found injured workers in non-standard shifts reported poorer health scores two years after an injury. However, it also found that injured shift workers were not more likely than injured day workers to leave their jobs or change out of their shifts.

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    For download; First published in 2012 by Mental Health Commission of Canada

    BC

    As international news stories have shown, this winter has seen a widespread, severe flu season. That is of particular concern for front-line healthcare workers when dealing with patients with certain highly contagious respiratory illnesses.

    Fortunately, healthcare workers can protect themselves and help to contain the spread of disease by wearing special masks when dealing with serious outbreaks of respiratory infections like tuberculosis, SARS, and certain influenza viruses. Known as N95 filtering facepiece respirators, these masks offer protection against dangerous airborne particles. In situations when N95 respirators are required, workplaces in British Columbia must implement a respiratory protection program (RPP). An RPP includes the proper selection, cleaning, maintenance, and fit-testing of respirators, along with appropriate education and training for workers.

    Education Module
    International

    Educators create online courses for the same reasons that they became teachers to begin with: to educate students, broaden their awareness of the world and thereby improve the students’ lives. And with massive open online courses (MOOCs), educators can now reach many more students at a time. But MOOCs offer many other benefits to the education community, including providing valuable lessons to the instructors who teach them.

    Online courses inherently allow students to create their own pathways through the material, which forces educators to think about the content in new ways. And MOOCs offer professors fresh opportunities to observe how their peers teach, learn from one another’s successes and failures and swap tactics to keep students engaged. This is, in turn, makes them better teachers.

    MOOCs are still the wild west of higher education, and there is no “one size fits all” approach to building one. At Coursera, we’ve been working with educators as they experiment with designing courses for this new format, and for a student body of unprecedented proportions. (For example, Duke University’s Think Again: How to Reason and Argue by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Ram Neta has more than 180,000 enrolled students.) We’re reimagining many aspects of what it means to teach a course, ranging from lecture delivery, to assignments, to strategies for engaging the online community of students.

    Research Resources
    International

    We all learn from others' experiences testing and implementing changes in real settings — who should be on the team; what measures were tracked; which changes worked best or didn't work at all; and what lessons were learned.

    Improvement Project Reports, submitted by IHI.org users, accelerate our learning. In the spirit of "all teach, all learn," we encourage you to share your Improvement Report with the IHI.org community.

    Professional Development
    International

    We currently offer online courses in the areas of quality improvement, patient safety, and leadership.  Each course takes one to two hours to complete and consists of several lessons taking 15-30 minutes each.

    Canada

    The Institute for Work & Health (IWH) is an independent, not-for-profit research organization. The Institute has been described as one of the top five occupational health and safety research centres in the world. At IWH, our goal is to protect and improve the health of working people by providing useful, relevant research. We conduct and share research with policy-makers, workers and workplaces, clinicians and health & safety professionals. Our research is driven by two broad goals. The first is to protect healthy workers by studying the prevention of work-related injury and illness. This type of research includes studies of workplace programs, prevention policies and the health of workers at a population level. The second is to improve the health and recovery of injured workers. We conduct research on treatment, return to work, disability prevention and management, and compensation policies.

    HSR Resources & Funding
    Ontario

    The high calibre of IHPME's health services research initiatives can be attributed to two features: the breadth of knowledge represented among our faculty and the value we place on collaboration and inter-disciplinary research. The Institute brings together health and social scientists with backgrounds in management science, information science, the evaluative sciences, political science and law, organizational studies, sociology, and economics.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Many of you will be surprised to find that you already know quite a lot about designing instruction. You plan for your courses by determining what skills and knowledge your new students already have, create assessments based on the goals of your course, and (hopefully) make adjustments along the way as you evaluate your own teaching in relation to your students' reactions.

    However, as we move into using newer technologies in the classroom, many faculty "forget" their good teaching practices to focus solely on the technology. What happens? Weak instructional practices and rather boring lessons: we default to the presentation of facts through a teacher-centered strategy. How many boring PowerPoint lectures have you seen lately?

    Using the principles and models of instructional design, we can avoid many of the problems often experienced by new teachers or anyone facing the requirement to use newer technologies in teaching.

    Knowledge Translation
    Saskatchewan

    In 2009, All Nations’ Healing Hospital in Fort Qu’Appelle, Saskatchewan, identified an opportunity to introduce a palette of electronic nursing resources through the use of personal digital assistants (PDAs), wireless infrastructure and laptop computers in order to enhance timely, at the-bedside access to current policies and procedures and resources.

    Individuals from All Nations’ Healing Hospital, MITACS Accelerate and the College of Nursing,
    University of Saskatchewan, formed a partnership. The partners were particularly interested
    exploring the impact of the technology innovations on nurses in a rural, primarily Aboriginal
    context.

    The work environment shifted from a reliance on paper-based, institutional documents to an
    online format. Nursing staff used their PDAs to ensure that the information they were using for
    patient care was relevant, up-to-date and applicable. All the partners benefited from working
    together, and there is a commitment from the Hospital and the University of Saskatchewan’s
    College of Nursing to maintain the relationship.

    Case begins on Page 42 of linked casebook

    Research Project
    Canada

    In 2008, The Change Foundation conducted a series of focus groups with patients who were frequent users of the health-care system, and family and friend caregivers of people with multiple chronic conditions. In those discussion groups, we heard that patients and informal caregivers had concerns about the delivery of health-care services (The Puzzlemaker). These concerns included:

    • a lack of coordination and communication among health-care providers—in particular, in the connecting of the hospital care process with the home-and-community-care process—which left them feeling frustrated, confused and forgotten;
    • a lack of confidence that necessary information had been transferred from one provider to another or one setting to another, which left them worrying and wondering who was responsible for what; and,
    • being asked to repeat tests and assessments, and provide the same medical histories and symptom reports to a series of providers. This left them wondering about waste, inefficiency and potential risks to their health.
    Knowledge Translation
    BC

    There is a wealth of credible and important immunization resources. This tool collates and highlights information and key national and provincial immunization resources for health-care providers.

    To use the graphic, simply click on the graphic and hover over the immunization topic of interest.  A list of subtopics within that channel will appear. Select the subtopic of interest, then select the resource.

    Academic Nursing
    International

    In the course of this program, interdisciplinary research teams have conducted 40 studies applying the most rigorous standards to examine nurses’ practices, processes and work environments and determine the impact nurses have on the quality of patient care. These studies comprise the first effort of this size and scope to identify both the ways in which nurses can improve the quality of patient care and the contributions nurses can make every day that keep patients safer and healthier. INQRI has built a base of knowledge that demonstrates nursing’s unique contributions to patients, families and communities across a diverse range of settings and has created a community of scholars committed to advancing interdisciplinary research to continue to build that knowledge.

    International

    Since its inception in 2005, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI) has sought to identify specific ways nurses affect patient care quality and outcomes. Over five years, the program supported interdisciplinary teams that involved nursing scholars and scholars from other disciplines in research projects—from the conceptual study design to the adoption in practice of new measures of standards of care. The final grant solicitation was conducted in 2010.

    This report highlights the groundbreaking and important work of the 40 grantees supported by INQRI. The program was led by Mary Naylor, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Mark Pauly, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania, in partnership with Lori Melichar, PhD, and her colleagues at RWJF.

    Researchers investigated such topics as nurses’ roles in avoiding hospital readmissions; addressing hospitalized patients’ risks for falls; reducing patients' pressure ulcers; improving pain outcomes; resolving medication discrepancies; and the effects of nurse staffing and skill mix on patient outcomes.

    “INQRI research provides a robust body of results that can be shared with policy-makers, hospital administrators and others who determine how nursing resources will be distributed to improve the quality and outcomes of patient care,” wrote the report authors.

    Research Project
    Alberta

    This Casebook, the second in a series produced by Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions, showcases knowledge translation activities of the Interdisciplinary Team Grant program.  The program was launched in 2008 to support research addressing complex health problems. Co-funded by Alberta Health and Wellness and Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions, the program provides $50 million over fi ve years for 10 teams. The teams are interdisciplinary and multi institutional and include nearly 600 researchers and 160 trainees, and support 147 international collaborations. Research activities of the teams cover the spectrum of basic biomedical, clinical, health services, and population health
    research and all encompass an integrated KT approach.

    Research Resources
    BC

    The linked reports were prepared by the Interior Health Research Department for the purposes of decision support, program planning and/or evaluation.

    Knowledge Translation
    BC

    The Knowledge Translation Casebook: Sharing Stories of Evidence-Informed Practice is a culmination of many years of research capacity enhancement within Interior Health, primarily led since December 2005 by the IH Research Capacity Enhancement Team and funded by the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research – Health Services and Policy Research Support Network. The team has strived to achieve sustainable research capacity within IH, translate and applying research and build/enhance research partnerships, throughout their time with IH (2005-2010). We hope that the stories contained within this casebook help inspire others within the organization to support their work – practices and decisions – with evidence, collaborate with others, and communicate the benefits of this translation in years to come.The Interior Health Knowledge Translation Casebook: Sharing Stories of Evidence-Informed Practice is the culmination of 5 years of research capacity enhancement within Interior Health and a collection of 30 examples of evidence-informed practices within the region.

    In this casebook, you will learn about some very diverse and interesting KT initiatives, written in very diverse and interesting styles. This series of KT stories provides valuable insights into the real world of evidence-informed practice and knowledge translation within the Interior Health region.
     

    Network
    International

    In 2011 the Commonwealth Fund, US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and APHCRI funded an international collaboration which concluded that a solid foundation of primary care is an essential ingredient for effective, efficient and equitable delivery of health care.

    The success of this initiative resulted in a follow-up meeting during the International Health Care Reform Conference in Brisbane, Australia in March 2012. The IIRNPC was then established jointly by APHCRI and the APHCRI Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) in Primary Health Care Microsystems (University of Queensland).

    In 2013 a follow-up to the Brisbane meeting was organised in Ottawa, Canada to refine the aims and objectives of the IIRNPC and to identify areas of work that could be undertaken in 2014.

    In March 2014 the IIRNPC members met again in Brisbane, Australia at the 2nd International Primary Health Care Reform Conference to address three goals:

    1. To seek expert’s experiences of issues associated with undertaking implementation research
    2. To build new (virtual) teams to share implementation research and ideas
    3. To consult on how participants would like to see the network work and its value to them
    Ontario

    This leading practice guide on the integration of internationally educated nurses (IENs) into the workplace is intended to assist employers of IENs. Given the aging nursing workforce, effective management of IEN recruitment, retention and integration is a priority.

    On this site, you will find the following sections:

    • Why you should hire IENs and what they bring to the workplace
    • How you can create a harmonious workforce that optimizes skills and knowledge
    • Case studies of organizational successes and leading practices
    • Links to useful resources and references, including interviews with healthcare organizations
    Professional Development
    International

    What is it all about?

    Quality Assurance processes have put aparticular emphasis on the developmentof Interprofessional learning for healthrelated undergraduate and postgraduateprogrammes in order to prepare healthand social care students to work withinmodern and proactive teams that workcollaboratively and respond to the changesin a fast moving healthcare economy

    Network
    BC

    Interprofessional collaboration and patient centred care are integral to addressing a number of key health care priorities including: access, recruitment and retention, primary healthcare, and patient safety. In-BC seeks to benefit all British Columbians by bringing together partners in health, education and government who believe that interprofessional education and collaborative practice are key to addressing BC's health care needs.

    Canada

    Health-care workers face a high risk of developing injuries to their muscles, tendons or other soft-tissues, including back pain. These injuries are also known as musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).

    Activities such as lifting and handling patients are one of the main causes of MSDs in health-care workers.

    Many prevention initiatives – such as using mechanical patient lifts, physical exercise programs or education programs – have been used to try to prevent MSDs from occurring in health-care workers. However, little is known about the effectiveness of these programs.

    IWH conducted a systematic review to summarize the existing scientific literature on the effectiveness of MSD prevention programs for health-care workers.

    The findings and recommendations from this review will be of interest to those involved in health and safety issues in health-care settings, including health-care workers, managers, policy-makers, unions researchers and others.

    Association
    Canada

    A historic rebranding was announced on June 1, 2014, at the Annual Meeting of the merged organizations of the Canadian Healthcare Association and the Association of Canadian Academic Healthcare Organizations in Banff, Alberta.  Going forward, the two organizations will be known as HealthCareCAN (SoinsSantéCAN).

    “HealthCareCAN uniquely highlights our role as leaders in knowledge exchange, the spread of innovations and the development of managers and leaders,” said Alice Downing and Chris Power, Co-Chairs of the Transitional Board of Directors for the new organization. “HealthCareCAN embodies our vision for the new organization and everything we CAN accomplish together to improve both organizational and system-wide performance.”

    HealthCareCAN is the national voice of healthcare organizations across Canada. We foster informed and continuous, results-oriented discovery and innovation across the continuum of healthcare. We act with others to enhance the health of all Canadians; to build the capability for high quality care; and to help ensure value for money in publicly financed, healthcare programs.

    Education Module
    International

    Introduction
    What is evidence-informed public health: A step-by-step approach. (0.5 hours)
    Learning Module

    1. Define: Clearly define the question or problem. (0.5 hours)
    2. Search: Efficiently search for research evidence. (1 hour)
    3. Appraise: Critically and efficiently appraise the information sources. (0.5 hours)
    4. Synthesize: Interpret information and form recommendations for practice. (0.5 hours)
    5. Adapt: Adapt the information to the local context. (0.5 hours)
    6. Implement: Decide whether (and plan how) to implement the evidence. (0.5 hours)
    7. Evaluate: Assess the effectiveness of implementation efforts. (0.5 hours)

    Conclusion and next steps
    Resources, learning opportunities for the future and feedback.
     

    Professional Development
    Canada

    As a part of the "Effective Continuing Professional Development for Translating Shared Decision Making in Primary Care" project funded by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research we are pleased to post our inventory of programs and training activities dedicated to shared decision making. This inventory is a detailed list of international training activities from around the world, designed for all kinds of healthcare professionals. The activities teach professionals about shared decision making and help them integrate the approach into their daily practice.

    Patient Safety
    International

    Following certain strategies could save the lives of the many patients who die in US hospitals because of unsafe practices by health care workers, a team of investigators report today in a supplement of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

    Each year, diagnostic errors result in the deaths of an estimated 44 000 to 80 000 patients, and many thousands die because of teamwork and communication errors affecting their care or because they do not receive necessary evidence-based interventions. Nearly 68 000 patients die from complications associated with bed sores, a largely preventable occurrence.

    Program Evaluation
    Canada

    How can a self-assessment tool help?

    Many organizations would like to make better use of research, but aren't sure where to start. Others feel they're doing well, but would also like to know if there are areas they could improve.

    Through self-assessment, an organization can discover its strengths, identify gaps, and make plans for addressing priority areas in the future. We hope the tool will not only help in self-evaluation, but also provide ideas for where and how to enhance research use.

    eHealth Resources
    International

    Nursing is a physically and mentally demanding profession.

    Add in the stress of a high-paced, chaotic emergency department (ED), and it's quite clear that emergency nurses benefit greatly from resources at their fingertips that generate efficiencies and assist in the delivery of quality patient care.

    Yet there is a glaring problem that often makes it difficult for ED nurses to perform at the highest possible level: great disparities in nurse educational standards and clinical practices.

    When nurses join new facilities, they are often at a loss as to their new ED's procedures and protocols, leading to internal problems such as communication breakdowns, workflow and throughput inefficiencies, clinical errors and low staff morale.
     

    International

    JBI COnNECT+ (Clinical Online Network of Evidence for Care and Therapeutics) provides you with easy access to evidence-based resources, making it easy for you to find and use evidence to inform your clinical decision-making.

    BC

    Education, training and downloadable tools

    Patient Safety
    Canada

    Health Council of Canada Commissioned Discussion Paper

    In this paper, we assess Canada’s current system of post-market surveillance and outline several
    recent initiatives in this country.We also examine in detail the approaches adopted in other
    jurisdictions that are taking steps to improve pharmacovigilance.Our examination of drug safety
    regimes in the European Union (EU), the United States (US), the United Kingdom (UK),
    New Zealand, and France identified important issues with respect to governance, funding,
    independence and research standards, transparency, data access and ownership, and public
    oversight that are relevant to Canada. A comparison of international approaches highlights
    the strengths and weaknesses of these strategies relative to our own situation. The key issues
    that need to be addressed to enhance public safety and confidence in pharmaceuticals in
    Canada are discussed.

    Patient Safety
    International

    What do we mean when we talk about patient safety?

    Doctors, nurses, and other health professionals dedicate their lives to caring for their patients. But providing health care can be complicated. There are often multiple steps involved in a health care visit. A number of different medical staff may be take part in the care of a single patient. And patients may be confused by unfamiliar words and technical language.

    eHealth Online Course
    International

    A free world-class education for anyone anywhere.The Khan Academy is an organization on a mission. We're a not-for-profit with the goal of changing education for the better by providing a free world-class education to anyone anywhere.

    Watch. Practice.
    Learn almost anything for free.

    With a library of over 2,700 videos covering everything from arithmetic to physics, finance, and history and 240 practice exercises, we're on a mission to help you learn what you want, when you want, at your own pace.

    All of the site's resources are available to anyone. It doesn't matter if you are a student, teacher, home-schooler, principal, adult returning to the classroom after 20 years, or a friendly alien just trying to get a leg up in earthly biology. The Khan Academy's materials and resources are available to you completely free of charge.
     

    Program Evaluation
    International

    Donald L Kirkpatrick, Professor Emeritus, University Of Wisconsin (where he achieved his BBA, MBA and PhD), first published his ideas in 1959, in a series of articles in the Journal of American Society of Training Directors. The articles were subsequently included in Kirkpatrick's book Evaluating Training Programs (originally published in 1994; now in its 3rd edition - Berrett-Koehler Publishers).

    Donald Kirkpatrick was president of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) in 1975. Kirkpatrick has written several other significant books about training and evaluation, more recently with his similarly inclined son James, and has consulted with some of the world's largest corporations.

    Donald Kirkpatrick's 1994 book Evaluating Training Programs defined his originally published ideas of 1959, thereby further increasing awareness of them, so that his theory has now become arguably the most widely used and popular model for the evaluation of training and learning. Kirkpatrick's four-level model is now considered an industry standard across the HR and training communities.

    More recently Don Kirkpatrick formed his own company, Kirkpatrick Partners, whose website provides information about their services and methods, etc.

    Network
    Canada

    KEN is a community website for professionals, parents, and families looking to find and offer information about healthcare and health services for children and youth. We invite you to browse the site, share your knowledge, ask questions, and provide comments.

    Patient Safety
    Canada

    “Knowledge is the best medicine” (KiBM) is a program that helps you take control of your health and work with your prescriber and the rest of your healthcare team to manage your medicines safely and appropriately. This program is supported by leading health organizations in Canada who believe that an educated patient is a healthier patient.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    The literature review builds on an earlier Scoping Review of the literature on
    knowledge mobilisation (Crilly et al, 2010; Ferlie at al, 2012a) which identified a gap in the healthcare literature and proposed work in three defined areas or domains. The first is Resource Based View of the Firm, a strategic management concept that examines how differences in capabilities, including knowledge, allow one firm to outperform another. There is no equivalent in healthcare. It states that strategic resources that are valuable, rare, difficult to imitate, and able to be exploited by organisational processes (VRIO principles), will give the firm a sustainable competitive advantage. The second is termed the Critical Perspective, concerned with power and authority in the workplace, which is alive to tensions between occupational groups such as doctors and managers. Two strands of particular interest are Foucauldian and neo-Marxist labour process critical theories. The third area is Organisational Form, which considers whether certain types of organisation, such as networks, are better than others at mobilising knowledge. 

    Consulting
    Ontario

    Founded in January 2007, Knowledge Mobilization Works is a consulting and training company based in Ottawa, Canada. We are dedicated to helping individuals and organization move what is collectively known into what we do. Our goal is simple: help make better decisions to produce better outcomes.

    We define knowledge mobilization as the complex process of making knowledge ready for service or action to create new value and benefits. The concept of “readiness” is recognition that while data and information can be analyzed by machines and presented in various ways, for this analysis to become knowledge, the content requires a social life with feedback loops that support the adaptation to variations in contexts, capacities of individuals and organizations, and cultures (both social and institutional).

    We offer a range of services that are combined in ways that best support each of our clients. Our CFIT model brings together consulting, facilitation, imagination, and training into comprehensive and customized packages that meets the needs of each client to improve their specific condition. From our perspective, the client is always at the centre of what we do.

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    Knowledge Mobilization as a concept, was introduced in Canada in 2001-2002 by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) under the leadership of Dr. Marc Renaud, with Vice-President, Pamela Wiggin. Peter Levesque, Director of Knowledge Mobilization Works, held the position of Deputy-Director of Knowledge Products and Mobilization for the period between 2002 and 2006.

    The definition of mobilization was taken in large part, from the French conceptualization – mobilisation – making ready for service or action.

    It was determined at the time that the ability to use much of what was produced in the social sciences and humanities was hindered by the conceptual and physical inaccessibility of the “production” of this sector. A set of initiatives were launched with the explicit intention of improving the conditions for uptake and utilization. One specific example was the knowledge mobilization efforts that were focused on the projects funded by the Initiative on the New Economy.

    Network
    Canada

    Welcome to the KS Canada / SC Canada website - the home of Canada's primary network of researchers, health professionals, trainees and other stakeholders all engaged in knowledge synthesis.

    KS Canada is proud to announce the launch of Systematic Review Protocol Registration! This international initiative will be officially launched on February 18, 2011 in Vancouver, BC. For more details please see the following flyers: Registering Systematic Review Protocols (English PDF) or Enregistrement des revues systematiques (Français PDF).
    Complete this form to register it is FREE 

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    CIHR has identified two broad categories of knowledge translation. The first, integrated KT, is an effective way of doing research that involves collaboration between researchers and knowledge users at every stage of the research process - from shaping the research question, to interpreting the results, to disseminating the research findings into practice. This co-production of research increases the likelihood that the results of a project will be relevant to end-users, thereby improving the possibility of uptake and application.

    The compilation of case studies found in this publication concerns itself with the second and equally important category of knowledge translation, end-of-grant KT. End-of-grant KT refers to the dissemination of findings generated from research once a project is completed, depending on the extent to which there are mature findings appropriate for dissemination. Researchers who undertake traditional dissemination activities such as publishing in peer-reviewed journals and presenting their research at conferences and workshops are engaging in end-of-grant knowledge translation.

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada (HSFC) has developed this guide to outline our approach to Knowledge Transfer and Exchange (KTE). The Guide is a working draft and will evolve with our understanding of how best to integrate KTE in our research programs. The Guide outlines:

    •  HSFC’s definition of KTE;
    •  requirements for KTE plans within grant applications for strategic initiatives;
    •  key factors that reviewers may consider when assessing KTE plans; and
    •  additional KTE-related resources.


    The information provided in this Guide is meant to give an overview of KTE, from an HSFC perspective, and provide some helpful hints and additional resources related to KTE.

    Although the focus of this Guide is on KTE within HSFC strategic funding initiatives, we encourage KTE in all research supported by the Foundation.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    The Knowledge Translation (KT) Strategies Database brings together research evidence on Knowledge Translation tools and strategies. Articles address approaches to translating, disseminating, and utilizing knowledge. The KT Strategies Database is a service of SEDL's Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) and Center on Knowledge Translation for Employment Research (KTER).

    What are the inclusion criteria for the database? The database serves as a resource of available articles that describe relevant KT tools and strategies that could be applied in disability and rehabilitation settings. Articles must be published in 2000 or later. Exceptions may be made for evidence-based research, with an earlier publication date, that has historical relevance.

    How are records obtained? Articles are identified from a search of online databases, grey literature, and references identified by authors. Suggestions for contributions to the database are also accepted.

    What is the evidence level of items in the KT Strategies Database? We are not claiming that these tools or strategies are effective. However, the strength of evidence is examined in terms of the rigor of the research supporting the informational material. The scale of 1-5 describes the supporting evidence identified during the review of the product.
     

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    Knowledge translation (KT) involves communication of research evidence. Within research-relevant organizations there is considerable overlap in the roles and activities associated with KT and strategic communications (SC), which calls for greater role clarity.We untangle the differences and similarities between KT and SC, bringing clarity that may benefit organizations employing both types of workers. As KT practitioners (KTPs) take hold in organizations that have long had SC personnel, there is tension but also opportunities for defining roles and exploring synergies. What follows is a description of how we have explored this duality within our networks and an analysis of how SC and KT roles are similar and divergent.

    Professional Development
    Canada

    The three Modules within this KT Curriculum serve as an in-depth introduction to knowledge translation (KT). Taken together, this Curriculum is a comprehensive – if unavoidably incomplete – overview of the key concepts, conflicts and methods in KT.

    Knowledge Translation
    Alberta

    This KT casebook, the third in a series produced by Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions,
    acknowledges research and innovation initiatives across the broad spectrum of health in Alberta. While the research involves different populations, stakeholders, and settings, the results highlight the strength and diversity of knowledge translation in the province.

    A critical component of the knowledge translation process is dissemination or communicating the results of research projects. This dissemination or end-of-grant KT is often targeted to academia and other researchers and does not always lead to the successful uptake of research evidence into policy and practice.

    The projects in this casebook concentrate on integrated KT, recognizing the importance of actively engaging potential end-users of research such as clinicians, policy-makers, and the public, throughout the research process. This method is collaborative, participatory, and focuses on reaching the widest possible audience.

    Knowledge Translation
    Alberta

    This KT casebook, the third in a series produced by Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions, acknowledges research and innovation initiatives across the broad spectrum of health in Alberta. While the research involves different populations, stakeholders, and settings, the results highlight the strength and diversity of knowledge translation in the province.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Knowledge derived from research and experience may be of little value unless it is put into practice. As a way of thinking about this challenge and how to start closing the “know-do” gap, the process of knowledge translation has emerged. It is defined as “the synthesis, exchange, and application of knowledge by relevant stakeholders to accelerate the benefits of global and local innovation in strengthening health systems and improving people’s health.” Given the broad scope of this challenge, both in general and specifically in regard to ageing and health, the World Health Organization’s Department of Ageing and Life Course has developed a guiding framework for the application of knowledge translation to ageing and health.

    The objective of this framework is to assist policy- and decision -makers in integrating evidence-based approaches to ageing in national health policy development processes, specific policies or programmes addressing older population needs and other health programmes concerned with such issues as HIV, reproductive health, chronicle diseases etc.

    The framework provide guidance through all the elements necessary for the transfer of knowledge and evidence into the policy development process. It can be used as a checklist in a situation analysis or in the planning process; and it may also serve as as a background document to inform decisions about existing conditions for knowledge transfer.

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    The KT Planning Primer is a tool that is designed to support active forms of knowledge sharing.
    It has three parts.

    • Diagram: a visual overview of the process of making knowledge matter. 
    • Worksheet: a series of steps to guide you through the process.
    • User Guide, Appendices and References: questions and resources to help you complete the Worksheet, and beyond. 
    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    From the KT Clearinghouse, a list of tools that facilitates the practice or the science of knowledge translation.

    • Tools for Practicing KT

      • Tools for querying primary studies that are the first generation knowledge
      • Tools for querying second-generation knowledge
      • Search Engine for guidelines and decision aids
      • Tools for developing, adapting and evaluating guidelines
      • Tools for developing, implementing and evaluating patient decision aids

    • Tools for Advancing the Science of KT
    • Uncategorized tools

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    Knowledge translation (KT), transfer and exchange, transfer, diffusion, mobilization, health innovation or commercialization, are all terms that have been used to describe the complex set of activities involved in advancing knowledge generated from research into effective changes in health policy, practice, or products. KT strategies are varied and might include presentations to non-academic stakeholders, brochures, summary reports, roundtable discussions or face–to-face meetings. The list of evidence-based KT strategies is growing steadily.

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    This guide was developed by an interdisciplinary team of knowledge and information specialists, together with the investigators of the Knowledge Utilization and Policy Implementation (KUPI) research program. KUPI is a multi-year (2002-2007), collaboration funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). Principal investigator, Dr. Carole Estabrooks, along with the rest of the KUPI team, are investigating the determinants and processes of using research knowledge in implementing policy to improve patient and system outcomes. KUPI consists of a unique team of researchers from across Canada that brings together the disciplines of nursing, organization studies, political sciences and sociology.

    Knowledge Translation
    BC

    As part of MSFHR's commitment to supporting the use of health research to improve health (knowledge translation, or KT), an online survey was launched in March 2012 to identify resource and training needs related to the use of health research evidence in practice and policy across the province.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    The ultimate goal of this workbook—and the book Making Data Talk: Communicating Public Health Data to the Public, Policy Makers, and the Press—is to help you select and communicate quantitative data in ways lay audiences can understand. You will gain the most from this workbook by reviewing its contents in concert with the book Making Data Talk: Communicating Public Health Data to the Public, Policy Makers, and the Press, making note of the tips and guidelines it presents, and completing the practical exercises beginning in Chapter 3 to ensure your understanding of the concepts and ability to successfully apply them. 

    Knowledge Translation
    Ontario

    To help ensure that their research makes a difference, research organizations are committing more time and resources to knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) — the practice of putting relevant research into the hands of key decision-makers and stakeholders in a timely, accessible and useful manner.

    Yet, the effectiveness of current KTE practices has not been routinely or consistently evaluated. In part, this could be because of the lack of instruments for assessing the impact of KTE activities.

    This systematic review sought to fill this gap. It looked across a wide variety of research fields to identify tools that can accurately and reliably measure how well KTE activities bring research evidence to practitioners and change their knowledge, attitudes and/or behaviour.

    The review found that few well-developed instruments are currently available. However, some instruments do show promise as potentially useful tools in evaluating KTE practices.
     

    HSR Centre
    International

    The Health Systems Research Centre (HSRC) in the Department of Management Science is a grouping of management scientists with a common interest in the development and application of management science/operational research methods, quantitative and qualitative, to important health systems issues. Whilst the health systems research issues tackled are wide and varied, many of them relate to the general challenges of helping health systems to make better use of available resources, in terms of both improving efficiency and improving patient experiences. Much of it concerns Knowledge Transfer, be it between researchers and practitioners, between industry and healthcare, or between the health systems of different countries.

    First Nations
    Canada

    The Landscapes 3rd Edition report has been developed as a resource for researchers, organizations, publishers, policy makers, funding agencies, and others working in Aboriginal health, allowing individuals to identify current trends, needs, and gaps in the field.  The report provides an overview of the
    current state of public health evidence, the landscape of research (including culturally relevant research), and opportunities for establishing new (and strengthening existing) partnerships with national organizations that focus on First Nations, Inuit, and Métis public health. The Landscapes 3rd Edition report is also a key resource for the NCCAH in charting future directions to meet our goal of reducing health inequities and supporting all Aboriginal peoples to achieve optimal public health

    Conference Presentations
    Canada

    The theme of the 2011 CEO Forum, Leadership Accountability in Canadian Healthcare: Creating the momentum to improve quality, grew from a clear message heard at the 2010 forum: Canada must create a culture of excellence in healthcare. We wanted to use this year’s meeting to discuss how to create an atmosphere that encourages quality improvement, and to share practical strategies to create a high-performing, integrated healthcare system. We also wanted to talk about the infrastructure needed to support innovation and quality improvement; how to align accountability at different levels, and how to measure performance to improve outcomes and reduce inefficiency. The afternoon sessions explored strategies for getting better value for money in healthcare—variation research, integrated care models and disinvestments strategies. These strategies are described briefly in the “Breakout Discussion” boxes in this report.

    Professional Development
    International

    These free self assessment tools can help individuals identify where their leadership strengths and development needs lie, to assist with personal development.

    Consisting of a short questionnaire for each domain, you will also find a personal development plan template included. There are three versions of the self assessment tool available
     

    Research Report
    International

    Last year we published research evidence that suggested that organisations may be looking in the wrong places when trying to improve leadership capacity (CIPD 2013c). While the capability of individuals is growing through training and experience, their ability to lead is not always realised, where an organisation’s context is not set up to meet the need for leadership.

    In this report we are looking in more detail at the barriers to leadership and good people management in practice. Our insights are based on over 120 interviews and focus groups with managers, employees and HR practitioners in seven large organisations. 

    Program Evaluation
    International

    What the NHS Academy for Large Scale Change learnt and how you can apply these principles within your own health and healthcare setting 

    International

    For nearly thirty years, my life's work has been to help people like you find ways to bring the often warring aspects of life into greater harmony."--Stew Friedman, from "Leading the Life You Want." You're busy trying to lead a "full" life. But does it really feel full--or are you stretched too thin? Enter Stew Friedman, Wharton professor, adviser to leaders across the globe, and passionate advocate of replacing the misguided metaphor of "work/life balance" with something more realistic and sustainable. If you're seeking "balance" you'll never achieve it, argues Friedman. The idea that "work" competes with "life" ignores the more nuanced reality of our humanity--the interaction of four domains: work, home, community, and the private self. The goal is to create harmony among them instead of thinking only in terms of trade-offs.

    Knowledge Translation
    BC

    In the health sector, Lean is a patient-focused approach to systematically eliminating waste in health care organizational processes in order to improve quality, productivity and efficiency. In essence, Lean involves mapping out the patient journey from the time they enter the system until they exit the system in order to identify activities that provide value to the patient and eliminate those that add no value (waste). Once wasteful activities are removed, remaining steps are made more efficient and integrated so that services flow smoothly. This means that services are “pulled” only when needed by patients. The final step of Lean is the pursuit of continuous improvement by repeating the cycle to get it more and more streamlined.

    In November 2010, Leadership Council decided to support the use of Lean within the health authorities as a process redesign tool. One of the strategic actions or Key Result Areas (KRAs) for achieving the Ministry of Health’s Innovation and Change Agenda is concerned with reducing waste and increasing value in the health care sector using Lean methods. A key deliverable for this KRA is an annual report for Leadership Council that outlines how Lean has been used in the province. This report presents seven case studies that have been identified by the health authorities as compelling and successful Lean initiatives.

    BC

    View the latest rounds, clinical announcements and educational presentations created by PHSA agencies in the PHSA Webcast Catalogue (Mediasite).

    The PHSA Webcast Catalogue showcases the Webcasting Service provided by our Media Production & Services. The Webcasting Service uses Mediasite to capture live events along with audio, video and any computer presentations (such as PowerPoint) for viewing live or on demand via the web.
     

    Program Evaluation
    International

    This paper captures lessons from recent experiences on using ‘theories of change’ amongst organisations involved in the research–policy interface. The literature in this area highlights much of the complexity inherent in the policymaking process, as well as the challenges around finding meaningful ways to measure research uptake. As a tool, ‘theories of change’ offers much, but the paper argues that the very complexity and dynamism of the research-to-policy process means that any theory of change will be inadequate in this context. Therefore, rather than overcomplicating a static depiction of change at the start (to be evaluated at the end), incentives need to be in place to regularly collect evidence around the theory, test it periodically, and then reflect and reconsider its relevance and assumptions. 

    Canada

    Learning From the Best: Benchmarking Canada's Health System examines Canadians' health status, non-medical determinants of health, quality of care and access to care. It is based on international results that appear in the OECD's Health at a Glance 2011, also being released today, which provides the latest statistics and indicators for comparing health systems across 34 member countries.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), in their commitment to building a Culture of Health in America, initiated a project entitled Identifying and Spreading Practices to Enable Effective Interprofessional Collaboration to better understand the role of interprofessional collaboration in advancing a Culture of Health. The results of this work are published in Lessons From the Field: Promising Interprofessional Collaboration Practices.

    Network
    BC

    Our mission is to foster effective communication, create community and facilitate care for LGBT persons at the end-of-life. We aim to raise awareness of the unique challenges that this population faces as they age and approach end-of-life. Our goal is to go beyond education and provide LGBT persons and their service providers with tools that will empower them to take positive action in regards to end-of-life planning. One such tool is The British Columbia LGBT End-of-Life Resource Inventory developed to provide an overview of the supports (health, housing, psychological and social support, spiritual, etc.) currently available in our province. There is much talk about community these days and debate over what community actually means. Here at LGBT End-of-Life Conversations, we feel community comes down to sharing end-of-life concerns and issues with our peers and positively supporting and interacting with each other. We encourage and hope you will participate in our discussion forum and join us in creating community by way of engaging and informative conversations.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    The AHRQ Library of Resources for Heart Disease offers important research updates and educational information to help with the management of diseases and conditions.

    Conference Presentations
    International

    On Sunday, 30 September, a debate began on Twitter – later dubbed #Twittergate – about the etiquette and ethics of live-tweeting academic conferences. Summarising the crux of the matter, journalist Steve Kolowich later writes: "Scholars often present unpublished work at conferences. But while they may be willing to expose an unpolished set of ideas to a group of peers, academics may be less eager to have those peers turn around and broadcast those ideas to the world".

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Eager to find out what impact blogging and social media could have on the dissemination of her work, Melissa Terras took all of her academic research, including papers that have been available online for years, to the web and found that her audience responded with a huge leap in interest in her work.

    Patient Safety
    International

    The Burden of Stress in America, a new report commissioned by NPR, RWJF, and the Harvard School of Public Health, makes it clear that Americans are experiencing extremely stressful life events that are contributing to poor health outcomes. As a researcher who studies loneliness and how it contributes to poor health, I found the report somewhat alarming. Many of the life events identified by survey respondents are already associated with loneliness in the health and social science literature. Stressful events like new illness and disease, losing a spouse or loved one, or major life transitions can all lead to a personal experience of loneliness. This is very concerning because loneliness is a unique psychological stressor that can be hard to recognize or remedy without professional help.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    Both the ‘green’ and the ‘gold’ models of open access tend to preserve the world of academic journals, where anonymous reviewers typically dictate what may appear. David Gauntlett looks forward to a system which gets rid of them altogether.

    Every week there’s something new in the open access debate. A couple of weeks ago the Finch report concluded that all publicly-funded research should indeed be made available free online (hurray!). But it favoured the so-called ‘gold’ model of open access, in which the highly profitable academic journal industry carries on as normal, but switches its demand for big piles of cash away from library journal subscriptions and over to authors themselves – or their institutions (boo!). Campaigners such as Stevan Harnad questioned why the Finch committee had not favoured the ‘green’ model, where authors put copies of their articles in free-to-access online repositories – the answer being, it was assumed, a successful blitz of lobbying by the publishing industry.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    The mission of the Make Research Matter website is to give researchers the tools they need to increase the dissemination and implementation potential of their products. MRM was developed, implemented and tested by researchers from the Cancer Communication Research Center and Washington University in St. Louis who were members of the Centers of Excellence in Cancer Communication (CECCR) Dissemination Research Interest Group (D-RIG).

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    Canadian Academy of Health Sciences.

    Twenty‐three different organizations sponsored this assessment. They all share an interest in defining the impacts of health research and learning how to improve the returns on investments in health research. Our remit from these sponsors was: Is there a “best way” (best method) to evaluate the impacts of health research in Canada, and are there “best metrics” that could be used to assess those impacts (or improve them)? Based on our assessment, we propose a new impacts framework and a preferred menu of indicators and metrics that can be used for evaluating the returns on investment in health research.

    Evidence-based practice
    Canada

    There’s simply no taking the politics out of the policy where Canadian healthcare is concerned — that’s probably one truism everyone can agree on. Debate on healthcare reform has been nothing less than an ideological turf war for decades in this country, and neither side seems to hold a magical formula for breaking what has become a tiresome and tedious deadlock between “private” and “public” health camps. “Frozen in Time” is how public health reporter André Picard describes our health system in his 2012 Conference Board of Canada Scholar-In-Residence Lecture.

    One could say the same of much of the healthcare debates played out across the country: frozen in time. Yet, the evidence on what works in healthcare, from nancing to funding and delivery models, only gets better and better as researchers examine and compare health systems around the world, and analyze data from decades of differing provincial and territorial models and pilot projects. Getting the evidence, as it turns out, has been the easy part — though it’s always a work in progress, and academics have no shortage of things they’d still like to study. Getting that evidence to influence health policy has proved to be much more challenging.

    Evidence-based practice
    International

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is defined as “the conduct and synthesis of research comparing the benefits and harms of different interventions and strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat and monitor health conditions in “’real-world’ settings.”1 The goal of CER is to improve patient outcomes by providing decision-makers, such as patients, providers, policy-makers, and payers, with information as to which interventions are most effective for specific types of patients. As the number of treatment options for many conditions has increased, decision-makers have begun seeking comparative information to support informed treatment choices. Comparative effectiveness information is often not available, however, either due to lack of funding, or because clinical research focuses on demonstrating efficacy. Efficacy measures how well interventions or services work under ideal circumstances, while effectiveness examines how well interventions or services work in real-world settings, where patients may have more complex conditions. The Institute of Medicine has estimated that less than half of all medical care in the United States is supported by adequate effectiveness evidence.

    Research Report
    Canada

    Background: Although innovation can improve patient care, implementing new ideas is often challenging.  Previous research found that professional attitudes, shaped in part by health policies and organisational cultures, contribute to differing perceptions of innovation ‘evidence’. However, we still know little about how evidence is empirically accessed and used by organisational decision-makers when innovations are introduced.

    Aims and objectives: We aimed to investigate the use of different sources and types of evidence in
    innovation decisions to answer the following questions: how do managers make sense of evidence? What role does evidence play in management decision-making when adopting and implementing innovations in health care? How do wider contextual conditions and intraorganisational capacity influence research use and application by health-care managers?

    Care delivery innovation
    International

    The government wants to place patients’ needs, wishes and preferences at the heart of clinical decision-making, a vision articulated by the Secretary of State for Health, Andrew Lansley, in the phrase ‘nothing about me, without me’. But what does this mean in practice?

    Making shared decision-making a reality: No decision about me, without me aims to answer that question. It clarifies what is meant by the term shared decision-making and what skills and resources are required to implement it and it also outlines what action is needed to make this vision a reality.

    Academic Nursing
    International

    I couldn’t find anything in the literature about my topic!” Sound familiar? Most educators will agree that this statement is a common refrain echoed by students. How we choose to help them learn the skills needed to provide informed nursing care or to identify the best teaching and learning practice is critical. The following letter to the Journal of Nursing Education from Karen O’Grady, formerly a Medical Librarian at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, reinforces the importance of establishing a partnership with a librarian in this endeavor.

    Network
    Canada

    Change management (CM) is foundational to achieving effective and efficient use of information and communications technologies (ICT) for health. Successful change implementation results in solution adoption and other long-term benefits such as improved patient care and positive organizational impacts. Success occurs when the systems, processes, tools and technology of the change initiative are embedded in the new way clinicians do their everyday work. CM is an essential driver of adoption, realizing many benefits of health ICT initiatives across Canada.

    Recognizing this, Infoway has established and supports the Pan-Canadian Change Management Network, a grassroots collaborative of change management leaders that has come together to develop and guide leading practices in change management for health ICT projects.

    Alberta

    This publication, which expands on an earlier document developed by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta (CPSA), provides background and context about the issue of disruptive behaviour in the workplace, including its effect on patient safety, and includes management strategies both individuals and organizations may use if faced with the issue.

    The accompanying Resource Toolkit is intended to support organizations in developing proactive policies and processes to address potentially disruptive behaviours before they negatively impact patient care. It contains sample templates, checklists, tools and other sample documents to support a behaviour-related initiative.

    Patient Safety
    Alberta

    This publication, which expands on an earlier document developed by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta (CPSA), provides background and context about the issue of disruptive behaviour in the workplace, including its effect on patient safety, and includes management strategies both individuals and organizations may use if faced with the issue.

    The accompanying Resource Toolkit is intended to support organizations in developing proactive policies and processes to address potentially disruptive behaviours before they negatively impact patient care. It contains sample templates, checklists, tools and other sample documents to support a behaviour-related initiative.

    Canada

    The Atlantic Regional Training Centre (ARTC) offers graduate training in applied health services research. The primary purpose of the ARTC is to increase health services research capacity throughout Atlantic Canada.

    Canada

    Nursing has always been an integral part of community healthcare, and that role will grow in the future. Rising hospital and long-term care costs, medical breakthroughs and new attitudes toward care are all driving demand for improved home care, public health, primary healthcare and other community care services. This move to community health requires careful human resources planning to ensure adequate skilled staff are available to deliver services and are used to their full potential.

    Knowledge Translation
    International

    There are few academics who are interested in doing research that simply has no influence on anyone else in academia or outside. Some perhaps will be content to produce ‘shelf-bending’ work that goes into a library (included in a published journal or book), and then over the next decades ever-so-slightly bends the shelf it sits on. But we believe that they are in a small minority. The whole point of social science research is to achieve academic impact by advancing your discipline, and (where possible) by having some positive influence also on external audiences - in business, government, the media, civil society or public debate.

    Care delivery innovation
    International

    The Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, a first-of-its-kind social media center focused on health care, builds on Mayo Clinic’s leadership among health care providers in adopting social media tools, which began with podcasting in 2005. Mayo Clinic has the most popular medical provider channel on YouTube and more than 100,000 “followers” on Twitter, as well as an active Facebook page with over 30,000 connections. With its News Blog, Podcast Blog and Sharing Mayo Clinic, a blog that enables patients and employees to tell their Mayo Clinic stories, Mayo has been a pioneer in hospital blogging. MayoClinic.com, Mayo’s consumer health information site, also hosts a dozen blogs on topics ranging from Alzheimer’s to The Mayo Clinic Diet.

    Mayo has also used social media tools for internal communications, beginning in 2008 with a blog to promote employee conversations relating to the organization’s strategic plan, and including innovative use of video and a hybrid “insider” newsletter/blog. This employee engagement contributes to Mayo Clinic being recognized among Fortune magazine’s “Best Places to Work.”

    The center will accelerate adoption of social media for health-related purposes, starting at Mayo and then within health care more broadly. Through this work, Mayo Clinic looks to help improve health literacy, health care delivery and population health worldwide.
     

    eHealth Resource
    Ontario
    • Scientific evidence about how to stay healthy, active and engaged as we grow older
    • A wealth of content specifically for citizens
    • Additional content for clinical, public health and policy professionals
    • Find out how the Portal can help you by watching the short video
    Network
    Ontario

    Three types of content for citizens:

    • Evidence Summaries: Key messages from scientific research that are ready to be acted on
    • Web Resource Ratings: Evaluations that tell you whether free health resources on the internet are based on scientific research
    • Blog Posts: Commentaries on what the scientific research on aging actually means for you

    Additional content for professionals: Ratings of and links to the best scientific evidence on clinical, public health and health policy questions

    Visitors to the Portal who have not registered are still able to read the Blog Posts and browse through the titles of Evidence Summaries, Web Resource Ratings and research articles

    Ontario

    Information about healthy aging that you can trust

    • Scientific evidence about how to stay healthy, active and engaged as we grow older.
    • A wealth of content specifically for citizens.
    • Additional content for clinical, public health and policy professionals.
    • Find out how the Portal can help you by watching the short video.
    • Register for free access to all content and receive updates
    Evidence-based practice
    Ontario

    Health Systems Evidence is a continuously updated repository of syntheses of research evidence about governance, financial and delivery arrangements within health systems, and about implementation strategies that can support change in health systems. Health Systems Evidence also contains a continuously updated repository of economic evaluations in these same domains, descriptions of health system reforms, and descriptions of health systems, as well as a variety of types of complementary content (e.g. World Health Organization documents about health systems).

    Knowledge Translation
    Ontario

    health-evidence.ca

    National Collaborating Centre for Methods & Tools

    Research Resources
    Ontario

    Health Systems Evidence is a continuously updated repository of syntheses of research evidence about governance, financial and delivery arrangements within health systems, and about implementation strategies that can support change in health systems.

    Knowledge Translation
    Canada

    KT+provides access to the current evidence on "T2" knowledge translation* (ie, research addressing the knowledge to practice gap), including published original articles and systematic reviews on health care quality improvement, continuing professional education, computerized clinical decision support, health services research and patient adherence. Its purpose is to inform those working in the knowledge translation area of current research as it is published.

    * based on the notion that T1 KT involves translational research from the lab to humans, while T2 KT has to do with understanding and enhancing the dissemination and application of research-derived knowledge in health care (Hulley et al, 2007).

     

    You will find two types of articles on this site:

    Quality-filtered KT Articles
    The best evidence relevant to knowledge translation in the areas of quality improvement, continuing medical education, computerized clinical decision support, health services research and patient adherence, identified from over 130 premier clinical journals. All citations are pre-rated for quality by research staff at McMaster University. All articles are then rated for clinical relevance and interest by at least 3 members of a worldwide panel of practicing health professionals.

    Non-filtered KT Articles
    Knowledge translation research articles identified from other sources (i.e., the included studies of KT systematic reviews) that are not quality filtered but have relevant KT content. These papers are not rated by the panel of health professionals.

    Here's what we offer:

    • A cumulative searchable bibliographic database of evidence from the health care literature
    • An email alerting system
    Evidence-based practice
    Canada

    Provides a list of links to free tools for evidence-based clinical practice.

    Professional Development
    Canada

    As a consortium of all seventeen Canadian medical schools, MDcme.ca is Canada's University eCME provider. Our access to a diverse and highly skilled group of content experts is unparalleled.

    Conference Presentations
    BC

    Presentation slides from workshop:

    Measuring Scholarly Impact: Citation Metrics 2012 from Dean Giustini

    Care delivery innovation
    BC

    From: BC Patient Safety & Quality Council
    The Measurement Strategies Report provides a summary of successful measurement systems from around the world and how these systems have been used to improve the quality of healthcare. This report was developed with input from the Measurement and Indicators Working Group.

    Program Evaluation
    Canada

    The 2003 First Ministers’ Accord on Health Care Renewal and the 2004 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care laid out agreements between the federal government and the provinces and territories to improve health care.2,3 They also came with additional health funding support from the federal government that included an annual 6% escalator in funding for 10 years, to end in 2013/14. The Health Council of Canada was created from these health accords, with a mandate to monitor and report to Canadians on their implementation. As a means of being accountable to Canadians, governments also committed to report regularly to Canadians about progress on the set of health reforms presented in the two accords.

    Since the health accords were created, there has been an explosion in the amount of health system data that is gathered and analyzed in Canada. Reporting on data using a variety of health indicators has become front and centre at all levels of the health care system as a way to track changes in health outcomes, report publicly on services being provided, inform planning, and drive quality improvement.

    Research Report
    BC

    The Canadian Prima